Wiktionary:Webster 1913

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The purpose of this page is to trace the progress of transferring and adapting material from versions of the 1913 Webster dictionary. The number references are to pages in that dictionary. Thus Wiktionary:Webster 1913/643 refers to page 643 of the 1913 Webster. When the data on a particular word has been integrated into Wiktionary, the material should be removed from the relevant Webster 1913 page. The pagination used has been based on that used by the University of Chicago ARTFL project, and takes into account errors in their coding; other editions often used different paginations. What will follow below is a list of pages whose adaptation has yet to be completed:

Further material from Webster 1913[edit]

acrisia, acrisy[edit]

[LL. acrisia, Gr. ; priv. + to separate, to decide.] 1. Inability to judge. 2. (medicine) Undecided character of a disease. [Obsolete]

acritan[edit]

(zoology) adj. Of or pertaining to the Acrita. -- n. An individual of the Acrita.

acrite[edit]

Adjective: (zoology) acritan. (Can we find and add a quotation of Owen to this entry?)

acronyc, acronychal[edit]

[Gr. at nightfall; + night.] (Astron.) Rising at sunset and setting at sunrise, as a star; -- opposed to cosmical. The word is sometimes incorrectly written acronical, achronychal, acronichal, and acronical.

berbe[edit]

  • Compare Berber, Barb a Barbary horse.
  • Zoology: An African genet (Genetta pardina). See genet.

bere[edit]

  • Compare Old Icelandic berja, to strike.
  • Obsolete. Transitive verb: To pierce. Chaucer.

bergmote[edit]

bertram[edit]

  • Corrupted from Latin pyrethrum, Greek, a hot spicy plant, from a word for fire.
  • Botany: Pellitory of Spain (Anacyclus pyrethrum).

cod line[edit]

An eighteen-thread line used in catching codfish. (Can we find and add a quotation of McElrath to this entry?)

coddymoddy[edit]

(zoology) A gull in the plumage of its first year.

cœlodont[edit]

[Gr. hollow + tooth.] (zoology) Having hollow teeth; said of a group lizards. -- n. One of a group of lizards having hollow teeth.

cœlum[edit]

[NL., fr. Gr. a hollow, neut. of hollow.] (anatomy) See body cavity.

Grain

Noun[edit]

  1. A sort of spice, the grain of paradise.</def> [Obs.]

    He cheweth grain and licorice,

To smellen sweet. Chaucer.

<cs><col>Against the grain</col>, <cd>against or across the direction of the fibers; hence, against one's wishes or tastes; unwillingly; unpleasantly; reluctantly; with difficulty.</cd> Swift.Saintsbury.

  • A grain of allowance</col>, <cd>a slight indulgence or latitude a small allowance.</cd>
  • Grain binder</col>, <cd>an attachment to a harvester for binding the grain into sheaves.</cd>
  • Grain colors</col>, <cd>dyes made from the coccus or kermes in sect.</cd>
  • Grain leather</col>. <sd>(a)</sd> <cd>Dressed horse hides.</cd> <sd>(b)</sd> <cd>Goat, seal, and other skins blacked on the grain side for women's shoes, etc.</cd>
  • Grain moth</col> <fld>(Zoöl.)</fld>, <cd>one of several small moths, of the family <spn>Tineidæ</spn> (as <spn>Tinea granella</spn> and <spn>Butalis cereAlella</spn>), whose larvæ devour grain in storehouses.</cd>
  • Grain side</col> <fld>(Leather)</fld>, <cd>the side of a skin or hide from which the hair has been removed; -- opposed to <contr>flesh side.</contr></cd>
  • Grains of paradise</col>, <cd>the seeds of a species of amomum.</cd>
  • grain tin</col>, <cd>crystalline tin ore metallic tin smelted with charcoal.</cd>
  • Grain weevil</col> <fld>(Zoöl.)</fld>, <cd>a small red weevil (Sitophilus granarius), which destroys stored wheat and othar grain, by eating out the interior.</cd>
  • Grain worm</col> <fld>(Zoöl.)</fld>, <cd>the larva of the grain moth. See <cref>grain moth</cref>, above.</cd>
  • In grain</col>, <cd>of a fast color; deeply seated; fixed; innate; genuine.</cd> Anguish in grain." Herbert.
  • To dye in grain</col>, <cd>to dye of a fast color by means of the coccus or kermes grain [see Grain, n., 5]; hence, to dye firmly; also, to dye in the wool, or in the raw material. See under <er>Dye.</er></cd>
  1. Quotations
    • The red roses flush up in her cheeks . . .

Likce crimson dyed in grain. Spenser.

  • To go against the grain of</col> (a person), <cd>to be repugnant to; to vex, irritate, mortify, or trouble.</cd>

Grain

Transitive verb[edit]

Imperfect and past participle: Grained ;
Present Participle: <er>Graining.</er>]

  1. To paint in imitation of the grain of wood, marble, etc.
  2. To form (powder, sugar, etc.) into grains.
  3. To take the hair off (skins); to soften and raise the grain of (leather, etc.).

Grain

Intransitive verb[edit]

Etymology[edit]

F. <ets>grainer</ets>, <ets>grener.</ets> See Grain, n.

  1. To yield fruit.</def> [Obs.]

Gower.

  1. To form grains, or to assume a granular ferm, as the result of crystallization; to granulate.

Grain

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

See Groin a part of the body.

  1. A branch of a tree; a stalk or stem of a plant.</def> [Obs.]

G. Douglas.

  1. A tine, prong, or fork.</def> Specifically: <sd>(a)</sd> <def>One the branches of a valley or of a river.</def> <sd>(b)</sd> <pluf>pl.</pluf> <def>An iron first speak or harpoon, having four or more barbed points.
  2. A blade of a sword, knife, etc.
  3. (Founding): A thin piece of metal, used in a mold to steady a core.

Grained

Adjective[edit]

  1. Having a grain; divided into small particles or grains; showing the grain; hence, rough.
  2. Dyed in grain; ingrained.
    Quotations
    • Persons lightly dipped, not grained, in generous honesty, are but pale in goodness.

Sir T. Browne.

  1. Painted or stained in imitation of the grain of wood, marble, etc.
  2. (Bot.): Having tubercles or grainlike processes, as the petals or sepals of some flowers.

Graith

Transitive verb[edit]

[Obs.] <def>See <er>Greith.</er>

Chaucer.

Graith

Noun[edit]

  1. Furniture; apparatus or accouterments for work, traveling, war, etc.</def> [Scot.]

Jamieson.

Grakle

Noun[edit]

  1. (Zoöl.): See <er>Grackle.</er>

Grallæ

n. pl.

Etymology[edit]

NL., fr. L. <ets>grallae</ets> stilts, for <ets>gradulae</ets>, fr. <ets>gradus.</ets> See <er>Grade.</er> <fld>(Zoöl.): An order of birds which formerly included all the waders. By later writers it is usually restricted to the sandpipers, plovers, and allied forms; -- called also <altname>Grallatores.</altname>

Grallatores

n. pl.

Etymology[edit]

NL. from L. <ets>grallator</ets> one who runs on stilts. <fld>(Zoöl.): See <er>Grallæ</er>.</def> <mhw>Grallatorial, Grallatory

<mhw> a. <fld>(Zoöl.): Of or pertaining to the Grallatores, or waders.

Grallic

Adjective[edit]

  1. (Zoöl.): Pertaining to the Grallæ.

Gralline

(l&imac;n), a. <fld>(Zoöl.): Of or pertaining to the Grallæ.

Gralloch

Noun[edit]

  1. Offal of a deer.</def> -- <def2>v. t. <def>To remove the offal from (a deer).</def></def2>

-gram

Etymology[edit]

Gr. ? a thing drawn or written, a letter, fr. <grk>gra`fein</grk> to draw, write. See <er>Graphic.</er>

  • A suffix indicating something drawn or written, a drawing, writing; -- as, monogram, telegram, chronogram.

Gram

Adjective[edit]

Etymology[edit]

AS. gram; akin to E. grim. &root;35.

  • Angry.</def> [Obs.]

Havelok, the Dane.

Gram

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Pg. <ets>gr?o</ets> grain. See <er>Grain.</er> <fld>(Bot.): The East Indian name of the chick-pea (<spn>Cicer arietinum</spn>) and its seeds; also, other similar seeds there used for food.

<mhw>Gram, Gramme

</mhw>, n.

Etymology[edit]

F. <ets>gramme</ets>, from Gr. ? that which is written, a letter, a small weight, fr. ? to write. See <er>Graphic.</er>

  • The unit of weight in the metric system. It was intended to be exactly, and is very nearly, equivalent to the weight in a vacuum of one cubic centimeter of pure water at its maximum density. It is equal to 15.432 grains. See Grain, n., 4.

<cs><col>Gram degree</col>, ∨ <col>Gramme degree</col></mcol> <fld>(Physics)</fld>, <cd>a unit of heat, being the amount of heat necessary to raise the temperature of one gram of pure water one degree centigrade.</cd>

  • Gram equivalent</col> <fld>(Electrolysis)</fld>, <cd>that quantity of the metal which will replace one gram of hydrogen.</cd>

half-cracked[edit]

Adjective[edit]

  1. (Colloquial): Half-demented; half-witted

half-deck[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. (Zoölogy): A shell of the genus Crepidula; a boat shell. See boat shell
  2. See Half deck, under deck

half-decked[edit]

Adjective[edit]

Partially decked.

  1. Quotations
    • The half-decked craft . . . used by the latter Vikings. - Elton

half-fish[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. (Zoölogy) (Provincial English): A salmon in its fifth year of growth.

half-hatched[edit]

Adjective[edit]

  1. Imperfectly hatched; as, half-hatched eggs. - Gay

half-heard[edit]

Adjective[edit]

  1. Imperfectly or partly heard to the end.
    Quotations
    • And leave half-heard the melancholy tale. - Pope

half-learned[edit]

Adjective[edit]

  1. Imperfectly learned.

half-length[edit]

Adjective[edit]

  1. Of half the whole or ordinary length, as a picture.

half-pike[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. (Military): A short pike, sometimes carried by officers of infantry, sometimes used in boarding ships; a spontoon. - Tatler

half-port[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. (Nautical): One half of a shutter made in two parts for closing a porthole.

half-read[edit]

Adjective[edit]

  1. Informed by insufficient reading; superficial; shallow. - Dryden

half-sighted[edit]

Adjective[edit]

  1. Seeing imperfectly; having weak discernment. - Bacon

half-strained[edit]

Adjective[edit]

  1. (Rare): Half-bred; imperfect
    Quotations
    • A half-strained villain. - Dryden

half-sword[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. Half the length of a sword; close fight.
    Quotations
    • At half-sword - Shakespeare

half-tounue[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. (Old Law): A jury, for the trial of a fore foreigner, composed equally of citizens and aliens.

halfway[edit]

Adverb[edit]

  1. In the middle; at half the distance; imperfectly; partially; as, he halfway yielded.
    Quotations
    • Temples proud to meet their gods halfway. Young

halfway[edit]

Adjective[edit]

Derived expressions[edit]

  • Halfway covenant, a practice among the Congregational churches of New England, between 1657 and 1662, of permitting baptized persons of moral life and orthodox faith to enjoy all the privileges of church membership, save the partaking of the Lord's Supper. They were also allowed to present their children for baptism

halichondriæ[edit]

Etymology[edit]

New Latin, from Greek, sea + cartilage

Plural noun[edit]

  1. (Zoölogy): An order of sponges, having simple siliceous spicules and keratose fibers; -- called also Keratosilicoidea

halicore[edit]

Etymology[edit]

New Latin, from Greek, sea + maiden

Noun[edit]

Same as dugong

halidom[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Anglo Saxon hāligdm holiness, sacrament, sanctuary, relics; hālig holy + -dm, English -dom. See holy

Noun[edit]

  1. (Archaic): Holiness; sanctity; sacred oath; sacred things; sanctuary; -- used chiefly in oaths.
    Quotations
    • So God me help and halidom. - Piers Plowman
    • By my halidom, I was fast asleep. Shakespeare
  2. (Rare): Holy doom; the Last Day. - Shipley

halmas[edit]

Etymology[edit]

See hallowmas

Adjective[edit]

  1. (Obsolete): The feast of All Saints; Hallowmas.

haliographer[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. One who writes about or describes the sea.

haliography[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Greek the sea + -graphy

Noun[edit]

  1. Description of the sea; the science that treats of the sea.

haliotis[edit]

Etymology[edit]

New Latin, from Greek sea + ear.]

Noun[edit]

  1. (Zoölogy): A genus of marine shells; the ear-shells. See abalone

halisauria[edit]

Etymology[edit]

New Latin, from Greek, sea +

Plural noun[edit]

  1. (Paleontology): The Enaliosauria.

hamel[edit]

Transitive verb: (Obsolete) Same as hamele.

Hamilton period[edit]

(Geol.) A subdivision of the Devonian system of America; -- so named from Hamilton, Madison County, New York. It includes the Marcellus, Hamilton, and Genesee epochs or groups.

noie[edit]

(Obsolete) Transitive verb: To annoy. See noy.

nome, nomen[edit]

(Obsolete) Past participle of nim. (Can we find and add a quotation of Chaucer to this entry?)

leed, leede[edit]

Leed, Leede (?), n. [Etymol. uncertain.] A caldron; a copper kettle. [Obs.] A furnace of a leed." Chaucer.

leef[edit]

Leef (?), a. & adv. See Lief. [Obs.] Chaucer.

leeme[edit]

Leeme (?), v. & n. See Leme. [Obs.] Chaucer.

leep[edit]

Leep (?), obs. strong imp. of Leap. leaped.

lees[edit]

Lees (?), n. A leash. [Obs.] Chaucer.

leese[edit]

Leese, v. t. [Cf. f. léser, L.laesus, p. p. of laedere.] To hurt. [Obs.] B. Jonson.

left-off[edit]

Left"-off" (?), a. Laid a side; cast-off.

leful[edit]

Le"ful (?), a. See Leveful. [Obs.] Chaucer.

See also[edit]