Wiktionary:Webster 1913/1583

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Page 1583

unvote

Transitive verb[edit]

Etymology[edit]

[First prefix <ets>un-</ets> + <ets>vote</ets>.]

  1. To reverse or annul by vote, as a former vote. [R.]

Bp, Burnet.

unvoweled

Adjective[edit]

  1. Having no vowel sounds or signs. <altsp>[Written also <asp>unvowelled</asp>.]</altsp>

Skinner.

unvulgarize

Transitive verb[edit]

Etymology[edit]

[First prefix <ets>un-</ets> + <ets>vulgarize</ets>.]

  1. To divest of vulgarity; to make to be not vulgar.

Lamb.

unvulnerable

Adjective[edit]

  1. Invulnerable. [Obs.]

unware

Adjective[edit]

Etymology[edit]

[AS. <ets>unwær</ets> unwary. See <er>Un-</er> not, and <a href="WEBSTER.sh?WORD=Wary">Wary</a>.]

  1. Unaware; not foreseeing; being off one's guard. [Obs.]

Chaucer. Fairfax.

  1. Happening unexpectedly; unforeseen. [Obs.]

The unware woe of harm that cometh behind. Chaucer.

-- <wordforms><wf>Un*ware"ly</wf>, adv. [Obs.] -- <wf>Un*ware"ness</wf>, ===Noun=== [Obs.]</wordforms>

unwares

adv.

  1. Unawares; unexpectedly; -- sometimes preceded by at. [Obs.]

Holinshed.

unwarily

adv.

  1. In an unwary manner.

unwariness

Noun[edit]

  1. The quality or state of being unwary; carelessness; heedlessness.

unwarm

Transitive verb[edit]

Etymology[edit]

[First prefix <ets>un-</ets> + <ets>warm</ets>.]

  1. To lose warmth; to grow cold. [R.]

unwarp

Transitive verb[edit]

Etymology[edit]

[First prefix <ets>un-</ets> + <ets>warp</ets>.]

  1. To restore from a warped state; to cause to be linger warped.

unwarped

Adjective[edit]

Etymology[edit]

[Pref. <ets>un-</ets> not + <ets>warped</ets>.]

  1. Not warped; hence, not biased; impartial.

unwarrantable

Adjective[edit]

  1. Not warrantable; indefensible; not vindicable; not justifiable; illegal; unjust; improper. -- <wordforms><wf>Un*war"rant*a*ble*ness</wf>, ===Noun===

-- <wf>Un*war"rant*a*bly</wf>, adv.</wordforms>

unwarranted

Adjective[edit]

  1. Not warranted; being without warrant, authority, or guaranty; unwarrantable.

unwary

Adjective[edit]

Etymology[edit]

[Cf. <a href="WEBSTER.sh?WORD=Unware">Unware</a>.]

  1. Not vigilant against danger; not wary or cautious; unguarded; precipitate; heedless; careless.
  2. Unexpected; unforeseen; unware. [Obs.]

Spenser.

unwashed

Adjective[edit]

  1. Not washed or cleansed; filthy; unclean.

<-- The great unwashed. people who are not wealthy. -->

unwashen

Adjective[edit]

  1. Not washed. [Archaic] To eat with unwashen hands."

Matt. xv. 20.

unwayed

Adjective[edit]

  1. Not used to travel; <as>as, colts that are <ex>unwayed</ex></as>. [Obs.]

Suckling.

  1. Having no ways or roads; pathless. [Obs.]

Wyclif.

unwearied

Adjective[edit]

  1. Not wearied; not fatigued or tired; hence, persistent; not tiring or wearying; indefatigable. -- <wordforms><wf>Un*wea"ried*ly</wf>, adv. -- <wf>Un*wea"ried*ness</wf>, n.</wordforms>

unweary

Transitive verb[edit]

Etymology[edit]

[First prefix <ets>un-</ets> + <ets>weary</ets>.]

  1. To cause to cease being weary; to refresh. [Obs.]

Dryden.

unweave

Transitive verb[edit]

Etymology[edit]

[First prefix <ets>un-</ets> + <ets>weave</ets>.]

  1. To unfold; to undo; to ravel, as what has been woven.

unwedgeable

Adjective[edit]

  1. Not to be split with wedges. [Obs.]

Shak.

unweeting

Adjective[edit]

Etymology[edit]

[See <er>Un-</er> not, and <a href="WEBSTER.sh?WORD=Weet">Weet</a>, <a href="WEBSTER.sh?WORD=Wit">Wit</a>.]

  1. Unwitting. [Obs.]

Chaucer. Spenser.

-- <wordforms><wf>Un*weet"ing*ly</wf>, adv. [Obs.]</wordforms>

Milton.

unweighed

Adjective[edit]

  1. Not weighed; not pondered or considered; <as>as, an <ex>unweighed</ex> statement</as>.

unweighing

Adjective[edit]

  1. Not weighing or pondering; inconsiderate.

Shak.

unweld, Unweldy

(?)<hw>, ===Adjective===

  1. Unwieldy; unmanageable; clumsy. [Obs.]

Our old limbs move [may] well be unweld. Chaucer.

unwell

Adjective[edit]

  1. Not well; indisposed; not in good health; somewhat ill; ailing.
  2. (Med.)</fld>
  3. Specifically, ill from menstruation; affected with, or having, catamenial; menstruant.

&hand; This word was formerly regarded as an Americanism, but is now in common use among all who speak the English language.

unwellness

  1. , n. Quality or state of being unwell.

unwemmed

Adjective[edit]

  1. Not blemished; undefiled; pure. [Obs.]

Wyclif.

With body clean and with unwemmed thought. Chaucer.

unwhole

Adjective[edit]

Etymology[edit]

[AS. <ets>unh&amacr;l</ets>. See <er>Un-</er> not, and <a href="WEBSTER.sh?WORD=Whole">Whole</a>.]

  1. Not whole; unsound. [Obs.]

unwieldy

Adjective[edit]

  1. Not easily wielded or carried; unmanageable; bulky; ponderous. A fat, unwieldy body of fifty-eight years old."

Clarendon.

-- <wordforms><wf>Un*wield"i*ly</wf> adv. -- <wf>Un*wield"i*ness</wf>, n.</wordforms>

unwild

Transitive verb[edit]

Etymology[edit]

[First prefix <ets>un-</ets> + <ets>wild</ets>.]

  1. To tame; to subdue. [Obs. & R.]

Sylvester.

unwill

Transitive verb[edit]

Etymology[edit]

[First prefix <ets>un-</ets> + <ets>will</ets>.]

  1. To annul or reverse by an act of the will.

Longfellow.

unwilled

Adjective[edit]

Etymology[edit]

[First prefix <ets>un-</ets> + <ets>will</ets>.]

  1. Deprived of the faculty of will or volition.

Mrs. Browning.

unwilling

Adjective[edit]

  1. Not willing; loath; disinclined; reluctant; <as>as, an <ex>unwilling</ex> servant</as>.

And drop at last, but in unwilling ears,

This saving counsel, Keep your piece nine years."

Pope.

-- <wordforms><wf>Un*will"ing*ly</wf>, adv. -- <wf>Un*will"ing*ness</wf>, n.</wordforms>

unwist

Adjective[edit]

  1. Not known; unknown. [Obs.]

Chaucer. Spenser.

  1. Not knowing; unwitting. [Obs.]

Wyclif.

unwit

Transitive verb[edit]

Etymology[edit]

[First prefix <ets>un-</ets> + <ets>wit</ets>.]

  1. To deprive of wit. [Obs.]

Shak.

unwit

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

[Pref. <ets>un-</ets> not + <ets>wit</ets>.]

  1. Want of wit or understanding; ignorance. [Obs.]

Chaucer.

unwitch

Transitive verb[edit]

Etymology[edit]

[First prefix <ets>un-</ets> + <ets>witch</ets>.]

  1. To free from a witch or witches; to fee from witchcraft. [R.]

B. Jonson.

unwitting

Adjective[edit]

  1. Not knowing; unconscious; ignorant. -- <wordforms><wf>Un*wit"ting*ly</wf>, adv.</wordforms>

unwoman

Transitive verb[edit]

Etymology[edit]

[First prefix <ets>un-</ets> + <ets>woman</ets>.]

  1. To deprive of the qualities of a woman; to unsex. [R.]

R. Browning.

unwonder

Transitive verb[edit]

Etymology[edit]

[First prefix <ets>un-</ets> + <ets>wonder</ets>.]

  1. To divest of the quality of wonder or mystery; to interpret; to explain. [R.]

Fuller.

unwont

Adjective[edit]

  1. Unwonted; unused; unaccustomed. [Archaic]

Sir W. Scott.

unwonted

Adjective[edit]

  1. Not wonted; unaccustomed; unused; not made familiar by practice; <as>as, a child <ex>unwonted</ex> to strangers</as>.

Milton.

  1. Uncommon; unusual; infrequent; rare; <as>as, <ex>unwonted</ex> changes</as>. Unwonted lights."

Byron.

-- <wordforms><wf>Un*wont"ed*ly</wf>, adv. -- <wf>Un*wont"ed*ness</wf>, n.</wordforms>

unwork

Transitive verb[edit]

Etymology[edit]

[First prefix <ets>un-</ets> + <ets>work</ets>.]

  1. To undo or destroy, as work previously done.

unworldly

Adjective[edit]

  1. Not worldly; spiritual; holy. Hawthorne. -- <wordforms><wf>Un*world"li*ness</wf> n.</wordforms>

unwormed

Adjective[edit]

  1. Not wormed; not having had the worm, or lytta, under the tongue cut out; -- said of a dog.

unworship

Transitive verb[edit]

Etymology[edit]

[First prefix <ets>un-</ets> + <ets>worship</ets>.]

  1. To deprive of worship or due honor; to dishonor. [Obs.]

Wyclif.

unworship

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

[Pref. <ets>un-</ets> not + <ets>worship</ets>.]

  1. Lack of worship or respect; dishonor. [Obs.]

Gower.

unworth

Adjective[edit]

Etymology[edit]

[AS. <ets>unweor</ets>.]

  1. Unworthy. [Obs.]

Milton.

unworth

Noun[edit]

  1. Unworthiness. [R.]

Carlyle.

unworthy

Adjective[edit]

  1. Not worthy; wanting merit, value, or fitness; undeserving; worthless; unbecoming; -- often with of. -- <wordforms><wf>Un*wor"thi*ly</wf> adv. -- <wf>Un*wor"thi*ness</wf>, n.</wordforms>

unwrap

Transitive verb[edit]

Etymology[edit]

[First prefix <ets>un-</ets> + <ets>wrap</ets>.]

  1. To open or undo, as what is wrapped or folded.

Chaucer.

unwray

Transitive verb[edit]

  1. See <a href="WEBSTER.sh?WORD=Unwrie">Unwrie</a>. [Obs.]

unwreathe

Transitive verb[edit]

Etymology[edit]

[First prefix <ets>un-</ets> + <ets>wreathe</ets>.]

  1. To untwist, uncoil, or untwine, as anything wreathed.

unwrie

Transitive verb[edit]

Etymology[edit]

[AS. <ets>onwreón</ets>; <ets>on-</ets> (see 1st <er>Un-</er>) + <ets>wreón</ets> to cover.]

  1. To uncover. [Obs.]

Chaucer.

unwrinkle

Transitive verb[edit]

Etymology[edit]

[First prefix <ets>un-</ets> + <ets>wrinkle</ets>.]

  1. To reduce from a wrinkled state; to smooth.

unwrite

Transitive verb[edit]

Etymology[edit]

[First prefix <ets>un-</ets> + <ets>write</ets>.]

  1. To cancel, as what is written; to erase.

Milton.

unwritten

Adjective[edit]

  1. Not written; not reduced to writing; oral; <as>as, <ex>unwritten</ex> agreements</as>.
  2. Containing no writing; blank; <as>as, <ex>unwritten</ex> paper</as>.

<cs><col>Unwritten doctrines</col> <fld>(Theol.)</fld>, <cd>such doctrines as have been handed down by word of mouth; oral or traditional doctrines.</cd> -- <col>Unwritten law</col>. ===Etymology=== [Cf. L. <ets>lex non scripta<ets>.] <cd>That part of the law of England and of the United States which is not derived from express legislative enactment, or at least from any enactment now extant and in force as such. This law is now generally contained in the reports of judicial decisions. See <cref>Common law</cref>, under <a href="WEBSTER.sh?WORD=Common">Common</a>.</cd> -- <col>Unwritten laws</col>, <cd>such laws as have been handed down by tradition or in song. Such were the laws of the early nations of Europe.</cd></cs>

unwroken

Adjective[edit]

Etymology[edit]

[See <er>Un-</er> not, and <a href="WEBSTER.sh?WORD=Wreak">Wreak</a>.]

  1. Not revenged; unavenged. [Obs.]

Surrey.

unyoke

Transitive verb[edit]

Etymology[edit]

[First prefix <ets>un-</ets> + <ets>yoke</ets>.]

  1. To loose or free from a yoke. Like youthful steers unyoked, they take their courses."

Shak.

  1. To part; to disjoin; to disconnect.

Shak.

unyoked

Adjective[edit]

Etymology[edit]

[In sense 1 pref. <ets>un-</ets> not + <ets>yoked</ets>; in senses 2 and 3 properly p. p. of <ets>unyoke</ets>.]

  1. Not yet yoked; not having worn the yoke.
  2. Freed or loosed from a yoke.
  3. Licentious; unrestrained. [R.]

Shak.

unyolden

Adjective[edit]

  1. Not yielded. [Obs.] [By] force . . . is he taken unyolden."

Sir T. Browne.

unzoned

Adjective[edit]

  1. Not zoned; not bound with a girdle; <as>as, an <ex>unzoned</ex> bosom</as>.

Prior.

up

adv.

Etymology[edit]

[AS. <ets>up</ets>, <ets>upp</ets>, <ets>p</ets>; akin to OFries. <ets>up</ets>, <ets>op</ets>, D. <ets>op</ets>, OS. <ets>p</ets>, OHG. <ets>f</ets>, G. <ets>auf</ets>, Icel. Sw. <ets>upp</ets>, Dan. <ets>op</ets>, Goth. <ets>iup</ets>, and probably to E. <ets>over</ets>. See <a href="WEBSTER.sh?WORD=Over">Over</a>.]

  1. Aloft; on high; in a direction contrary to that of gravity; toward or in a higher place or position; above; -- the opposite of <ant>down</ant>.

But up or down,

By center or eccentric, hard to tell.

Milton.
  1. Hence, in many derived uses, specifically: --

<sd>(a)</sd>

  1. From a lower to a higher position, literally or figuratively; as, from a recumbent or sitting position; from the mouth, toward the source, of a river; from a dependent or inferior condition; from concealment; from younger age; from a quiet state, or the like; -- used with verbs of motion expressed or implied.

But they presumed to go up unto the hilltop. Num. xiv. 44.

I am afflicted and ready to die from my youth up. Ps. lxxxviii. 15.

Up rose the sun, and up rose Emelye. Chaucer.

We have wrought ourselves up into this degree of Christian indifference. Atterbury.

<sd>(b)</sd>

  1. In a higher place or position, literally or figuratively; in the state of having arisen; in an upright, or nearly upright, position; standing; mounted on a horse; in a condition of elevation, prominence, advance, proficiency, excitement, insurrection, or the like; -- used with verbs of rest, situation, condition, and the like; <as>as, to be <ex>up</ex> on a hill; the lid of the box was <ex>up</ex>; prices are <ex>up</ex></as>.

And when the sun was up, they were scorched. Matt. xiii. 6.

Those that were up themselves kept others low. Spenser.

Helen was up -- was she? Shak.

Rebels there are up,

And put the Englishmen unto the sword.

Shak.

His name was up through all the adjoining provinces, even to Italy and Rome; many desiring to see who he was that could withstand so many years the Roman puissance. Milton.

Thou hast fired me; my soul's up in arms. Dryden.

Grief and passion are like floods raised in little brooks by a sudden rain; they are quickly up. Dryden.

A general whisper ran among the country people, that Sir Roger was up. Addison.

Let us, then, be up and doing,

With a heart for any fate.

Longfellow.

<sd>(c)</sd>

  1. To or in a position of equal advance or equality; not short of, back of, less advanced than, away from, or the like; -- usually followed by to or with; <as>as, to be <ex>up</ex> to the chin in water; to come <ex>up</ex> with one's companions; to come <ex>up</ex> with the enemy; to live <ex>up</ex> to engagements</as>.

As a boar was whetting his teeth, up comes a fox to him. L'Estrange.

<sd>(d)</sd>

  1. To or in a state of completion; completely; wholly; quite; <as>as, in the phrases to eat <ex>up</ex>; to drink <ex>up</ex>; to burn <ex>up</ex>; to sum <ex>up</ex>; etc.; to shut <ex>up</ex> the eyes or the mouth; to sew <ex>up</ex> a rent</as>.

&hand; Some phrases of this kind are now obsolete; as, to spend up (Prov. xxi. 20); to kill up (B. Jonson).

<sd>(e)</sd>

  1. Aside, so as not to be in use; <as>as, to lay <ex>up</ex> riches; put <ex>up</ex> your weapons</as>.

&hand; Up is used elliptically for get up, rouse up, etc., expressing a command or exhortation. Up, and let us be going." Judg. xix. 28.

Up, up, my friend! and quit your books,

Or surely you 'll grow double.

Wordsworth.

<cs><col>It is all up with him</col>, <cd>it is all over with him; he is lost.</cd> -- <col>The time is up</col>, <cd>the allotted time is past.</cd> -- <col>To be up in</col>, <cd>to be informed about; to be versed in.</cd> Anxious that their sons should be well up in the superstitions of two thousand years ago." H. Spencer. -- <col>To be up to</col>. <sd>(a)</sd> <cd>To be equal to, or prepared for; as, he is up to the business, or the emergency.</cd> [Colloq.] <sd>(b)</sd> <cd>To be engaged in; to purpose, with the idea of doing ill or mischief; <as>as, I don't know what he's <ex>up to</ex></as>.</cd> [Colloq.] -- <col>To blow up</col>. <sd>(a)</sd> <cd>To inflate; to distend.</cd> <sd>(b)</sd> <cd>To destroy by an explosion from beneath.</cd> <sd>(c)</sd> <cd>To explode; <as>as, the boiler <ex>blew up</ex></as>.</cd> <sd>(d)</sd> <cd>To reprove angrily; to scold.</cd> [Slang] -- <col>To bring up</col>. <cd>See under <a href="WEBSTER.sh?WORD=Bring">Bring</a>, v. t.</cd> -- <col>To come up with</col>. <cd>See under <a href="WEBSTER.sh?WORD=Come">Come</a>, v. i.</cd> -- <col>To cut up</col></mcol>. <cd>See under <a href="WEBSTER.sh?WORD=Cut">Cut</a>, v. t. & i.</cd> -- <col>To draw up</col>. <cd>See under <a href="WEBSTER.sh?WORD=Draw">Draw</a>, v. t.</cd> -- <col>To grow up</col>, <cd>to grow to maturity.</cd> -- <col>Up anchor</col> <fld>(Naut.)</fld>, <cd>the order to man the windlass preparatory to hauling up the anchor.</cd> -- <col>Up and down</col>. <sd>(a)</sd> <cd>First up, and then down; from one state or position to another. See under <a href="WEBSTER.sh?WORD=Down">Down</a>, adv.</cd></cs>

Fortune . . . led him up and down. Chaucer.

<sd>(b)</sd> <fld>(Naut.)</fld> <cd>Vertical; perpendicular; -- said of the cable when the anchor is under, or nearly under, the hawse hole, and the cable is taut.</cd> Totten. -- <col>Up helm</col> <fld>(Naut.)</fld>, <cd>the order given to move the tiller toward the upper, or windward, side of a vessel.</cd> -- <col>Up to snuff</col>. <cd>See under <a href="WEBSTER.sh?WORD=Snuff">Snuff</a>.</cd> [Slang] -- <col>What is up?</col> <cd>What is going on?</cd> [Slang] <-- what's up? what's happening? -->

up

prep.

  1. From a lower to a higher place on, upon, or along; at a higher situation upon; at the top of.

In going up a hill, the knees will be most weary; in going down, the thihgs. Bacon.

  1. From the coast towards the interior of, as a country; from the mouth towards the source of, as a stream; <as>as, to journey <ex>up</ex> the country; to sail <ex>up</ex> the Hudson</as>.
  2. Upon. [Obs.] Up pain of death."

Chaucer.

up

Noun[edit]

  1. The state of being up or above; a state of elevation, prosperity, or the like; -- rarely occurring except in the phrase ups and downs. [Colloq.]

<cs><col>Ups and downs</col>, <cd>alternate states of elevation and depression, or of prosperity and the contrary.</cd> [Colloq.]</cs>

They had their ups and downs of fortune. Thackeray.

up

Adjective[edit]

  1. Inclining up; tending or going up; upward; <as>as, an <ex>up</ex> look; an <ex>up</ex> grade; the <ex>up</ex> train</as>.