Wiktionary:Webster 1913/367

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Damsel[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Old English damosel, damesel, damisel, damsel, from Old French damoisele, damisele gentlewoman, French demoiselle young lady; compare Old French damoisel young nobleman, French damoiseau; from Late Latin domicella, dominicella, feminine, domicellus, dominicellus, masculine, diminutive from Latin domina, dominus. See dame, and compare demoiselle, doncella

Noun[edit]

  1. (Obsolete): A young person, either male or female, of noble or gentle extraction; as, Damsel Pepin; Damsel Richard, Prince of Wales
  2. A young unmarried woman; a girl; a maiden.
    Quotations
    • With her train of damsels she was gone, In shady walks the scorching heat to shum. - Dryden
    • Sometimes a troop of damsels glad, . . . Goes by to towered Cameleot. - Tennyson
  3. (Milling): An attachment to a millstone spindle for shaking the hoppe.

Damson[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Old English damasin the Damascus plum, from Latin damascenus. See damascene

Noun[edit]

  1. A small oval plum of a blue color, the fruit of a variety of the Prunus domestica; -- called also damask plum.

Dan[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Old English dan, danz, Old French. danz (properly only nominative), dan, master, from Latin dominus. See dame

Noun[edit]

  1. (Obsolete): A title of honor equivalent to master, or sir.
    Quotations
    • Old Dan Geoffry, in gently spright The pure wellhead of poetry did dwell. - Spenser
    • What time Dan Abraham left the Chaldee land. - Thomson

Etymology 2[edit]

Uncertain

Noun[edit]

  1. (Mining): A small truck or sledge used in coal mines.

Danaide[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From the mythical Danaides, who were condemned to fill with water a vessel full of holes

Noun[edit]

  1. (Machines): A water wheel having a vertical axis, and an inner and outer tapering shell, between which are vanes or floats attached usually to both shells, but sometimes only to one.

Danaite[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Named after J. Freeman Dana

Noun[edit]

  1. (Mineralogy): A cobaltiferous variety of arsenopyrite

Danalite[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Named after James Dwight Dana

Noun[edit]

  1. (Mineralogy): A mineral occuring in octahedral crystals, also massive, of a reddish color. It is a silicate of iron, zinc manganese, and glicinum, containing sulphur.

Danburite[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Named after Danbury, CT

Noun[edit]

  1. (Mineralogy): A borosilicate of lime, first found at Danbury, Conn. It is near the topaz in form. - Dana

Dance[edit]

Etymology[edit]

French danser, from Old High German dansn to draw; akin to dinsan to draw, Gothic apinsan, and probably from the same root (meaning to stretch) as English thin

Intransitive verb[edit]

Imperfect and past participle: danced
Present participle: dancing

  1. To move with measured steps, or to a musical accompaniment; to go through, either alone or in company with others, with a regulated succession of movements, (commonly) to the sound of music; to trip or leap rhytmically.
    Quotations
    • Jack shall pipe and Gill shall dance. - Wiher
    • Good shepherd, what fair swain is this Which dances with your dauther? - Shakespeare,
  2. To move nimbly or merrily; to express pleasure by motion; to caper; to frisk; to skip about.
    Quotations
    • Then, 'tis time to dance off. - Thackeray
    • More dances my rapt heart Than when I first my wedded mistress saw. - Shakespeare,
    • Shadows in the glassy waters dance. Byron.
    • Where rivulets dance their wayward round. - Wordsworth

Derived expressions[edit]

  • To dance on a rope, To dance on nothing, to be hanged.

Dance[edit]

Transitive verb[edit]

  1. To cause to dance, or move nimbly or merrily about, or up and down; to dandle.
    Quotations
    • To dance our ringlets to the whistling wind. Shakespeare,
    • Thy grandsire loved thee well; Many a time he danced thee on his knee. Shakespeare,

Derived expression[edit]

  • To dance attendance, to come and go obsequiously; to be or remain in waiting, at the beck and call of another, with a view to please or gain favor.
  1. Quotations
    • A man of his place, and so near our favor, To dance attendance on their lordships' pleasure. Shakespeare,

Dance[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. The leaping, tripping, or measured stepping of one who dances; an amusement, in which the movements of the persons are regulated by art, in figures and in accord with music.
  2. (Music): A tune by which dancing is regulated, as the minuet, the waltz, the cotillon, etc.
    Note: The word dance was used ironically, by the older writers, of many proceedings besides dancing.
    Quotations
    • Of remedies of love she knew parchance For of that art she couth the olde dance. - Chaucer

Derived expressions[edit]

  • Dance of Death (Art), an allegorical representation of the power of death over all, -- the old, the young, the high, and the low, being led by a dancing skeleton
  • Morris dance. See Morris
  • To lead one a dance, to cause one to go through a series of movements or experiences as if guided by a partner in a dance not understood.

Dancer[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. One who dances or who practices dancing.

Derived expressions[edit]

  • The merry dancers, beams of the northern lights when they rise and fall alternately without any considerable change of length. See Aurora borealis, under Aurora

Danceress[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. (Obsolete): A female dancer. - Wyclif

Dancetté[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Compare French danché dancetté, dent tooth

Adjective[edit]

  1. (Heraldry): Deeply indented; having large teeth; thus, a fess dancetté has only three teeth in the whole width of the escutcheon.

Dancing[edit]

Participle[edit]

from Dance

Derived expressions[edit]

  • Dancing girl, one of the women in the East Indies whose profession is to dance in the temples, or for the amusement of spectators. There are various classes of dancing girls
  • Dancing master, a teacher of dancing
  • Dancing school, a school or place where dancing is taught.

Dancy[edit]

Adjective[edit]

  1. (Heraldry): same as Dancetté

Dandelion[edit]

Etymology[edit]

French dent de lion lion's tooth, from Latin dens tooth + leo lion. See tooth, noun, and lion

Noun[edit]

  1. (Botany): A well-known plant of the genus Taraxacum (T. officinale, formerly called T. dens-leonis and Leontodos taraxacum) bearing large, yellow, compound flowers, and deeply notched leaves.

Dander[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Corrupted from dandruff

Noun[edit]

  1. Dandruff or scurf on the head.
  2. (Low): Anger or vexation; rage - Halliwell

Etymology 2[edit]

See dandle

Intransitive verb[edit]

  1. (Provincial English): To wander about; to saunter; to talk incoherently. - Halliwell

Dandi[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Hindi, from an oar

Noun[edit]

  1. (India): A boatman; an oarsman

Dandie[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. (Zoölogy): One of a breed of small terriers; -- called also Dandie Dinmont.

Dandified[edit]

Adjective[edit]

  1. Made up like a dandy; having the dress or manners of a dandy; buckish.

Dandify[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Dandy + -fy

Transitive verb[edit]

Imperfect and past participle: dandified
Present participle: dandifying

  1. To cause to resemble a dandy; to make dandyish.

Dandiprat[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Dandy + brat child

Noun[edit]

  1. A little fellow; -- in sport or contempt.
    Quotations
  2. A small coin.
    Quotations
    • Henry VII stamped a small coin called dandiprats. - Camden

Dandle[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Compare German dändeln to trifle, dandle, Old Dutch and Provincial German danten, German tand trifle, prattle; Scots dandill, dander, to go about idly, to trifle

Transitive verb[edit]

Imperfect and past participle: dandled
Present participle: dandling

  1. To move up and down on one's knee or in one's arms, in affectionate play, as an infant.
    Quotations
    • Ye shall be dandled . . . upon her knees. - Is.?
  2. To treat with fondness, as if a child; to fondle; to toy with; to pet.
    Quotations
    • They have put me in a silk gown and gaudy fool's cap; I as ashamed to be dandled thus. - Addison
    • The book, thus dandled into popularity by bishops and good ladies, contained many pieces of nursery eloquence. - Jeffrey
  3. (Obsolete): To play with; to put off or delay by trifles; to wheedle. [Obs.]
    Quotations
    • Captains do so dandle their doings, and dally in the service, as it they would not have the enemy subdued. - Spenser

Dandler[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. One who dandles or fondles.

Dandriff[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. See dandruff. - Swift

Dandruff[edit]

Variant[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Probably from Welsh toncrust, peel, skin + Anglo Saxon drf dirty, draffy, or Welsh drwg bad: compare Anglo Saxon tan a letter, an eruption

Noun[edit]

  1. A scurf which forms on the head, and comes off in small or particles

Dandy[edit]

Noun[edit]

Plural: dandies

Etymology 1[edit]

Compare French dandin, ninny, silly fellow, dandiner to waddle, to play the fool; probably. allied to English dandle

Noun[edit]

  1. One who affects special finery or gives undue attention to dress; a fop; a coxcomb.

Etymology 2[edit]

Uncertain

Noun[edit]

  1. (Nautical): A sloop or cutter with a jigger on which a lugsail is set.
  2. (Nautical): A small sail carried at or near the stern of small boats; -- called also jigger, and mizzen.

Derived expressions[edit]

  • Dandy brush, a yard whalebone brush. --
  • Dandy fever. See Dengue
  • Dandy line, a kind of fishing line to which are attached several crosspieces of whalebone which carry a hook at each end
  • Dandy roller, a roller sieve used in machines for making paper, to press out water from the pulp, and set the paper.

Dandy-cock[edit]

Etymology[edit]

See dandy

Masculine noun[edit]

Feminine: Dandy-hen==

  1. A bantam fowl.

Dandy-hen[edit]

Etymology[edit]

See dandy

Feminine noun[edit]

Masculine: dandy-cock

  1. A bantam fowl.

Dandyish[edit]

Adjective[edit]

Like a dandy

Dandyism[edit]

Noun[edit]

The manners and dress of a dandy; foppishness - Byron

Dandyise[edit]

Transitive and intransitive verb[edit]

To make, or to act, like a dandy; to dandify

Dandyling[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Dandy + ling

Noun[edit]

  1. A little or insignificant dandy; a contemptible fop

Dane[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Late Latin Dani: compare Anglo Saxon Dene

Noun[edit]

A native, or a naturalized inhabitant, of Denmark

Derived expression[edit]

Danegeld[edit]

Variant[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Anglo Saxon danegeld. See Dane, and geld, noun

Noun[edit]

  1. (English History): An annual tax formerly laid on the English nation to buy off the ravages of Danish invaders, or to maintain forces to oppose them. It afterward became a permanent tax, raised by an assessment, at first of one shilling, afterward of two shillings, upon every hide of land throughout the realm. - Wharton's Law Dict. Tomlins

Danewort[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. (Botany): A fetid European species of elder (Sambucus Ebulus); dwarf elder; wallwort; elderwort; -- called also Daneweed, Dane's weed, and Dane's-blood. [Said to grow on spots where battles were fought against the Danes.]

Dangerful[edit]

Adjective[edit]

  1. (Obsolete) Full of danger; dangerous.

Dangerfully[edit]

Adverb[edit]

  1. (Obsolete): In a dangerful manner - Udall

Dangerless[edit]

Adjective[edit]

  1. (Rare) Free from danger

Dangerous[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Old English, haughty, difficult, dangerous, from Old French dangereus, French dangereux. See danger.

Adjective[edit]

  1. Attended or beset with danger; full of risk; perilous; hazardous; unsafe.
    Quotations
    • Our troops set forth to-morrow; stay with us; The ways are dangerous. Shakespeare, King Lear, IV-v
    • It is dangerous to assert a negative. - Macaulay
  2. Causing danger; ready to do harm or injury.
    Quotations
    • If they incline to think you dangerous To less than gods. - Milton
  3. (Colloquial): In a condition of danger, as from illness; threatened with death. - Forby, Bartlett
  4. (Obsolete): Hard to suit; difficult to please
    Quotations
    • My wages ben full strait, and eke full small; My lord to me is hard and dangerous. - Chaucer
  5. (Obsolete): Reserved; not affable
    Quotations
    • Of his speech dangerous. - Chaucer

Dangerously[edit]

Adverb[edit]

  1. In a dangerous manner

Dangerousness[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. The degree of danger

Dangle[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Akin to Danish dangle, dialect Swedish dangla, Danish dingle, Swedish dingla, Icelandic dingla; perhaps from English ding

Intransitive verb[edit]

Imperfect and past participle: dangled
Present participle: dangling

  1. To hang loosely, or with a swinging or jerking motion.
    Quotations
    • he'd rather on a gibbet dangle Than miss his dear delight, to wrangle. - Hudibras
    • From her lifted hand Dangled a length of ribbon. - Tennyson

Derived expression[edit]

  • To dangle about or after: to hang upon importunately; to court the favor of; to beset.
  1. Quotations
    • The Presbyterians, and other fanatics that dangle after them, are well inclined to pull down the present establishment. - Swift

Dangle[edit]

Transitive verb[edit]

  1. To cause to dangle; to swing, as something suspended loosely; as, to dangle the feet.
    Quotations
    • And the bridegroom stood dangling his bonnet and plume. - Sir W. Scott

Dangleberry[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. (Botany): A dark blue, edible berry with a white bloom, and its shrub (Gaylussacia frondosa) closely allied to the common huckleberry. The bush is also called blue tangle, and is found from New England to Kentucky, and southward.

Dangler[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. One who dangles about or after others, especially after women; a trifler.
    Quotations
    • Danglers at toilets." - Burke

Daniel[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Eponymous for the Biblical personage

Noun[edit]

  1. A Hebrew prophet distinguished for sagacity and ripeness of judgment in youth; hence, a sagacious and upright judge.
    Quotations
    • A Daniel come to judgment. - Shakespeare, Merchant of Venice, IV-i

Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

See Dane

Adjective[edit]

  1. Belonging to the Danes, or to their language or country

Noun[edit]

  1. The language of the Danes

Derived expressions[edit]

  • Danish dog (Zoölogy): one of a large and powerful breed of dogs reared in Denmark; -- called also great Dane

Danite[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. A descendant of Dan; an Israelite of the tribe of Dan. - Judges 13:2
  2. (United States), (So called in remembrance of the prophecy in Genesis 49:17, Dan shall be a serpent by the way," etc.): One of a secret association of Mormons, bound by an oath to obey the heads of the church in all things

Dank[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Compare dialect Swedish dank a moist place in a field, Icelandic.dökk pit, pool; possibly akin to English. damp or to daggle dew

Adjective[edit]

  1. Damp; moist; humid; wet.
    Quotations
    • Now that the fields are dank and ways are mire. - Milton
    • Cheerless watches on the cold, dank ground. - Trench

Noun[edit]

  1. (Obsolete): Moisture; humidity; water

Etymology 2[edit]

Persian

Noun[edit]

A small silver coin current in Persia.

Dankish[edit]

Adjective[edit]

  1. Somewhat dank
    Quotations
    • In a dark and dankish vault at home. - Shakespeare, Comedy of Errors, V-i

Derived word[edit]

Dankishness[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. The quality of being dankish

Dannebrog[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. The ancient battle standard of Denmark, bearing figures of cross and crown. Order of Dannebrog, an ancient Danish order of knighthood.

Danseuse[edit]

Etymology[edit]

French, from danser to dance

Noun[edit]

  1. a professional female dancer; a woman who dances at a public exhibition as in a ballet.

Dansk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Danish

Adjective[edit]

  1. (Obsolete): Danish.

Dansker[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. (Obsolete): A Dane
    Quotations
    • Inquire me first what Danskers are in Paris. - Shakespeare, Hamlet, II-i

Dantean[edit]

Adjective[edit]

  1. Relating to, emanating from or resembling, the poet Dante or his writings.

Dantesque[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Compare Italian Dantesco

Adjective[edit]

  1. Dantelike; Dantean. - Earle

Danubian[edit]

Adjective[edit]

  1. Pertaining to, or bordering on, the river Danube.

Dap[edit]

Intransitive verb[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Compare dip

Intransitive verb[edit]

(Angling): To drop the bait gently on the surface of the water.

  1. Quotations
    • To catch a club by dapping with a grasshoper. - Walton

Dapatical[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Latin dapaticus, from daps feast

Adjective[edit]

  1. (Obsolete): Sumptuous in cheer. - Bailey

Daphne[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Latin, a laurel tree, from Greek

Noun[edit]

  1. (Botany): A genus of diminutive shrubs, mostly evergreen, and with fragrant blossoms.
  2. (Mythology): A nymph of Diana, fabled to have been changed into a laurel tree.

Daphnetin[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. (Chemistry): A colorless crystalline substance, C9H6O4, extracted from daphnin.

Daphnia[edit]

Etymology[edit]

New Latin

Noun[edit]

  1. (Zoölogy): A genus of water fleas in the family Daphniidae.

Daphniidae[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. (Zoölogy): A family of water fleas in the Brachiopod order Diplostraca

Daphnin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Compare French daphnine

Noun[edit]

  1. (Chemistry)(Rare): A dark green bitter resin extracted from the mezereon (Daphne mezereum) and regarded as the essential principle of the plant
  2. (Chemistry): A white, crystalline, bitter substance, regarded as a glucoside, and extracted from Daphne mezereum and Daphne alpina

Daphnomancy[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Greek δαφνη the laurel + -mancy

Noun[edit]

  1. Divination by means of the laurel.

Dapifer[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Latin, daps a feast + ferre to bear

Noun[edit]

  1. One who brings meat to the table; hence, in some countries, the official title of the grand master or steward of the king's or a nobleman's household.

Dapper[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Old English daper; probably from Dutch dapper brave, valiant; akin to German tapfer brave, Old High German taphar heavy, weighty, Old Slavic dobrû good, Russian dobrui. Compare deft

Adjective[edit]

  1. Little and active; spruce; trim; smart; neat in dress or appearance; lively.
    Quotations
    • He wondered how so many provinces could be held in subjection by such a dapper little man. - Milton
    • The dapper ditties that I wont devise. - Spenser
    • Sharp-nosed, dapper steam yachts. - Julian Hawthorne

Dapperling[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. (Rare): A dwarf; a dandiprat

Dapple[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Compare Icelandic depill a spot, a dot, a dog with spots over the eyes, dapi a pool, and English dimple

Noun[edit]

  1. One of the spots on a dappled animal.
    Quotations
    • He has . . . as many eyes on his body as my gray mare hath dapples. - Sir P. Sidney

Adjective[edit]

also as dappled

  1. Marked with spots of different shades of color; spotted; variegated; as, a dapple horse.
    Quotations
    • Some dapple mists still floated along the peaks. - Sir W. Scott
    Note The word is used in composition to denote that some color is variegated or marked with spots; as, dapple-bay; dapple-gray.
    Quotations
    • His steed was all dapple-gray. - Chaucer
    • O, swiftly can speed my dapple-gray steed. Sir W. Scott

Transitive verb[edit]

Imperfect and past participle: dappled
Present participle: dappling

  1. To variegate with spots; to spot.
    Quotations
    • The gentle day, . . . Dapples the drowsy east with spots of grey. - Shakespeare, Much Ado about Nothing, V-iii
      • Note: For this quotation various editions of Shakespeare use the spelling “grey”, while websites that slavishly copy the 1913 Webster use the spelling “gray”
    • The dappled pink and blushing rose. - Prior

Darbies[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Cant

Plural noun[edit]

  1. Manacles; handcuffs
    Quotations
    • Jem Clink will fetch you the darbies. - Sir W. Scott
    • 1576: To binde such babes in father Derbies bands. - Gascoigne, In The Steel Glass

Darby[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. A plasterer's float, having two handles; -- used in smoothing ceilings, etc.

Darbyite[edit]

Etymology[edit]

eponymous from John N. Darby, one of the leaders of the Brethren.

Noun[edit]

  1. One of the Plymouth Brethren, or of a sect among them

Dardanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin Dardania, poetic name of Troy

Adjective and noun[edit]

  1. Trojan.

Dare[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Old English I dar, dear, I dare, imperfect dorste, durste, Anglo Saxon ic dear I dare, imperfect dorste, infinitive durran; akin to Old Saxon gidar, gidorsta, gidurran, Old High German tar, torsta, turran, Gothic gadar, [[gadaúrsta, Greek tharsei^n, tharrei^n, to be bold, tharsy`s bold, Sanskrit dhrsh to be bold

Intransitive verb[edit]

Imperfect: durst or dared
Past participle: dared;
Present participle: daring
The present tense, I dare, is really an old past tense, so that the third person is he dare, but the form he dares is now often used, and will probably displace the obsolescent he dare, through grammatically as incorrect as he shalls or he cans. - Skeat
Formerly durst was also used as the present. Sometimes the old form dare is found for durst or dared.

  1. To have adequate or sufficient courage for any purpose; to be bold or venturesome; not to be afraid; to venture.
    Quotations
    • I dare do all that may become a man; Who dares do more is none. - Shakespeare, Macbeth, I-vii
    • Why then did not the ministers use their new law? Bacause they durst not, because they could not. - Macaulay
    • Who dared to sully her sweet love with suspicion. - Thackeray
    • The tie of party was stronger than the tie of blood, because a partisan was more ready to dare without asking why. - Jowett (Thuyd.)
    • The pore dar plede (the poor man dare plead). - P. Plowman.
    • You know one dare not discover you. - Dryden
    • The fellow dares not deceive me. - Shakespeare, Cymbeline, IV-i
    • Here boldly spread thy hands, no venom'd weed Dares blister them, no slimly snail dare creep. - Beau. & Fl.

Transitive verb[edit]

Imperfect and past participle: dared;
Present participle: daring.] 1. To have courage for; to attempt courageously; to venture to do or to undertake.

  1. Quotations
    • What high concentration of steady feeling makes men dare every thing and do anything? - Bagehot
    • To wrest it from barbarism, to dare its solitudes. - The Century
  2. To challenge; to provoke; to defy.
    Quotations
    • Time, I dare thee to discover Such a youth and such a lover. - Dryden

Noun[edit]

  1. (Rare): The quality of daring; venturesomeness; boldness; dash.
    Quotations
    • It lends a luster . . . A larger dare to our great enterprise. - Shakespeare, Henry IV Part I, IV-i
      • Note: “large” in Webster is a misquote; it does not scan correctly
  2. Defiance; challenge.
    Quotations
    • Childish, unworthy dares Are not enought to part our powers. - Chapman
    • Sextus Pompeius Hath given the dare to Cæsar. - Shakespeare, Antony and Cleopatra, I-ii

Dare[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Old English darien, to lie hidden, be timid

Intransitive verb[edit]

  1. (Obsolete): To lurk; to lie hid. - Chaucer

Transitive verb[edit]

  1. (Obsolete): To terrify; to daunt
    Quotations
    • For I have done those follies, those mad mischiefs, Would dare a woman. - Beau. & Fl.

Derived expression[edit]

  • To dare larks, to catch them by producing terror through to use of mirrors, scarlet cloth, a hawk, etc., so that they lie still till a net is thrown over them. - Nares

Etymology 3[edit]

See dace

Noun[edit]

  1. (Zoölogy): A small fish; the dace.

Dare-devil[edit]

Noun[edit]

A reckless fellow. Also used adjectively; as, dare-devil excitement.

  1. Quotations
    • A humorous dare-devil -- the very man To suit my prpose. - Ld. Lytton

Dare-deviltry[edit]

Noun[edit]

Plural: dare-deviltries

  1. Reckless mischief; the action of a dare-devil.

Dareful[edit]

Adjective[edit]

  1. (Rare): Full af daring or of defiance; adveturous.
    Quotations
    • We might have met them dareful, beard to beard, - Shakespeare, Macbeth, V-v

Darer[edit]

Noun[edit]

One who dares or defies.

Darg[edit]

Variant[edit]

Dargue

Etymology[edit]

Scots, contraction from day work

Noun[edit]

  1. (Local, England and Scotland): A day's work; also, a fixed amount of work, whether more or less than that of a day

Daric[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Greek , of Persian origin

Noun[edit]

  1. (Antiquities): A gold coin of ancient Persia, weighing usually a little more than 128 grains, and bearing on one side of the figure of an archer
  2. (Antiquities): A silver coin of about 86 grains, having the figure of an archer, and hence, in modern times, called a daric.
  3. Any very pure gold coin.

Daring[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. Boldness; fearlessness; adventurousness; also, a daring act.

Daring[edit]

Adjective[edit]

  1. Bold; fearless; adventurous; as, daring spirits.

Daringly[edit]

Adverb[edit]

  1. In a daring manner

Daringness[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. The quality of daring

Dark[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Old English dark, derk, deork, Anglo Saxon dearc, deorc; compare Gaelic and Irish dorch, dorcha, dark, black, dusky

Adjective[edit]

  1. Destitute, or partially destitute, of light; not receiving, reflecting, or radiating light; wholly or partially black, or of some deep shade of color; not light-colored; as, a dark room; a dark day; dark cloth; dark paint; a dark complexion.
    Quotations
    • O dark, dark, dark, amid the blaze of noon, Irrecoverable dark, total eclipse Without all hope of day! - Milton
    • In the dark and silent grave. - Sir W. Raleigh
  2. Not clear to the understanding; not easily through; obscure; mysterious; hidden.
    Quotations
    • The dark problems of existence. - Shairp
    • What may seem dark at the first, will afterward be found more plain. - Hooker
    • What's your dark meaning, mouse, of this light word? - Shakespeare, Love’s Labours Lost, V-ii
  3. Destitute of knowledge and culture; in moral or intellectual darkness; unrefined; ignorant.
    Quotations
    • The age wherin he lived was dark, but he Could not want light who taught the world to see. - Denhan
    • The tenth century used to be reckoned by mediæval historians as the darkest part of this intellectual night. - Hallam
  4. Evincing black or foul traits of character; vile; wicked; atrocious; as, a dark villain; a dark deed.
    Quotations
    • Left him at large to his own dark designs. - Milton
  5. Foreboding evil; gloomy; jealous; suspicious.
    Quotations
    • More dark and dark our woes. - Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet, III-v
    • A deep melancholy took possesion of him, and gave a dark tinge to all his views of human nature. - Macaulay
    • There is, in every true woman-s heart, a spark of heavenly fire, which beams and blazes in the dark hour of adversity. - W. Irving
  6. (Obsolete): Deprived of sight; blind
    Quotations
    • He was, I think, at this time quite dark, and so had been for some years. - Evelyn

Derivative expressions[edit]

Dark is sometimes used to qualify another adjective; as, dark blue, dark green, and sometimes it forms the first part of a compound; as, dark-haired, dark-eyed, dark-colored, dark-seated, dark-working

  • A dark horse (Colloquial), in racing or politics, a horse or a candidate whose chances of success are not known, and whose capabilities have not been made the subject of general comment or of wagers
  • Dark house, Dark room (Obsolete), a house or room in which madmen were confined.
    Quotations
    • deserves as well a dark house and a whip as madmen do - Shakespeare, As You Like It, III-ii
  • Dark lantern. See lantern
  • The Dark Ages, a period of stagnation and obscurity in literature and art, lasting, according to Hallam, nearly 1000 years, from about 500 to about 1500. See Middle Ages, under middle
  • The Dark and Bloody Ground, a phrase applied to the State of Kentucky, and said to be the significance of its name, in allusion to the frequent wars that were waged there between Indians
  • The dark day, a day (May 19, 1780) when a remarkable and unexplained darkness extended over all New England
  • To keep dark (Low), to reveal nothing

Noun[edit]

  1. Absence of light; darkness; obscurity; a place where there is little or no light.
    Quotations
    • Here stood he in the dark, his sharp sword out. - Shakespeare, King Lear, II-i
  2. The condition of ignorance; gloom; secrecy.
    Quotations
    • Look, what you do, you do it still i' th' dark. - Shakespeare, Love’s Labours Lost, V-ii
    • Till we perceive by our own understandings, we are as muc in the dark, and as void of knowledge, as before. - Locke
  3. (Fine Arts): A dark shade or dark passage in a painting, engraving, or the like; as, the light and darks are well contrasted.
    Quotations
    • The lights may serve for a repose to the darks, and the darks to the lights. - Dryden

Transitive verb[edit]

  1. (Obsolete): To darken to obscure. - Milton

Darken[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Anglo Saxon deorcian. See dark

Transitive verb[edit]

Imperfect and past participle: darkened
Present participle: Darkening

  1. To make dark or black; to deprite of light; to obscure; as, a darkened room.
    Quotations
    • They [locusts] covered the face of the whole earth, so that the land was darkened. - Exodus 10:15
    • So spake the Sovran Voice; and clouds began To darken all the hill. - Milton
  2. To render dim; to deprive of vision.
    Quotations
    • Let their eyes be darkened, that they may not see. - Romans 11:10
  3. To cloud, obscure, or perplex; to render less clear or intelligible.
    Quotations
    • Such was his wisdom that his confidence did seldom darkenhis foresight. - Bacon
    • Who is this that darkeneth counsel by words without knowledge? - Job. 38:2.
  4. To cast a gloom upon.
    Quotations
    • With these forc’d thoughts, I prithee, darken not The mirth o’ the feast. - Shakespeare, Winter’s Tale, IV-iv
  5. To make foul; to sully; to tarnish.
    Quotations
    • I must not think there are Evils enow to darken all his goodness. - Shakespeare, Antony and Cleopatra, I-iv

Intransitive verb[edit]

  1. To grow darker.

Darkener[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. One who, or that which, darkens.

Darkening[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. (Provincial English and Scots): Twilight; gloaming - Wright

Darkful[edit]

Adjective[edit]

  1. (Obsolete): Full of darkness

Darkish[edit]

Adjective[edit]

  1. Somewhat dark; dusky.

Darkle[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Frequentative of dark

Intransitive verb[edit]

  1. To grow dark; to show indistinctly. - Thackeray

Darkling[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Dark + the adverbial suffix -ling

Adverb[edit]

  1. (Poetic): In the dark
    Quotations
    • So, out went the candle, and we were left darkling. - Shakespeare, King Lear, I-iv
    • As the wakeful bird Sings darkling. - Milton

Present participle and adjective[edit]

  1. Becoming dark or gloomy; frowning.
    Quotations
    • His honest brows darkling as he looked towards me. - Thackeray
  2. Dark; gloomy. The darkling precipice. - Moore

Darkly[edit]

Adverb[edit]

  1. With imperfect light, clearness, or knowledge; obscurely; dimly; blindly; uncertainly.
    Quotations
    • What fame to future times conveys but darkly down. - Dryden
    • so softly dark and darkly pure. - Byron
  2. With a dark, gloomy, cruel, or menacing look.
    Quotations
    • Looking darkly at the clerguman. - Hawthorne

Darkness[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. The absence of light; blackness; obscurity; gloom.
    Quotations
    • And darkness was upon the face of the deep. - Genesis 1-2

2. A state of privacy; secrecy.

  1. Quotations
    • What I tell you in darkness, that speak ye in light. - Matthew 10:27.
  2. A state of ignorance or error, especially on moral or religious subjects; hence, wickedness; impurity.
    Quotations
    • Men loved darkness rather than light, because their deeds were evil. - John. 3:19
    • Pursue these sons of darkness: drive them out From all heaven's bounds. - Milton
  3. Want of clearness or perspicuity; obscurity; as, the darkness of a subject, or of a discussion.
  4. A state of distress or trouble.
    Quotations
    • A day of clouds and of thick darkness. - Joel 2:2

Derived expressions[edit]

  • Prince of darkness, the Devil; Satan
  1. Quotations
    • In the power of the Prince of darkness. - Locke

Synonym[edit]

  • Darkness, Dimness, Obscurity, Gloom
  • Darkness arises from a total, and dimness from a partial, want of light. A thing is obscure when so overclouded or covered as not to be easily perceived. As the shade or obscurity increases, it deepens into gloom. What is dark is hidden from view; what is obscure is difficult to perceive or penetrate; the eye becomes dim with age; an impending storm fills the atmosphere with gloom. When taken figuratively, these words have a like use; as, the darkness of ignorance; dimness of discernment; obscurity of reasoning; gloom of superstition.

Darksome[edit]

Adjective[edit]

  1. (Poetic): Dark; gloomy; obscure; shaded; cheerless
    Quotations
    • He brought him through a darksome narrow pass To a broad gate, all built of beaten gold. - Spenser

Darky[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. (Slang): A negro

Darling[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Old English derling, deorling, Anglo Saxon deórling; deóre dear + -ling. See dear, and -ling

Noun[edit]

  1. One dearly beloved; a favorite.
    Quotations
    • And can do nought but wail her darling's loss. - Shakespeare, Henry VI Part II, III-i

Adjective[edit]

  1. Dearly beloved; regarded with especial kindness and tenderness; favorite.
    Quotations

Darlingtonia[edit]

Etymology[edit]

New Latin Named after Dr. William Darlington, a botanist of West Chester, PA

Noun[edit]

  1. (Botany): A genus of California pitcher plants consisting of a single species. The long tubular leaves are hooded at the top, and frequently contain many insects drowned in the secretion of the leaves.

Darn[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Old English derne, probably of Celtic origin; compare Welsh darnio to piece, break in pieces, Welsh and Armenian to English tear. Compare tear

Transitive verb[edit]

Imperfect and past participle: darned
Present participle: darning

  1. To mend as a rent or hole, with interlacing stitches of yarn or thread by means of a needle; to sew together with yarn or thread.
    Quotations
    • He spent every day ten hours in his closet, in darning his stockins. - Swift
Derived expressions[edit]
  • Darning last. See under last
  • Darning needle.
    • A long, strong needle for mending holes or rents, especially in stockings
    • (Zoölogy): Any species of dragon fly, having a long, cylindrical body, resembling a needle. These flies are harmless and without stings. [In this sense, usually written with a hyphen.] Called also devil's darning-needle.

Noun[edit]

  1. A place mended by darning.

Etymology 2[edit]

Euphemism

Transitive verb[edit]

  1. A colloquial euphemism for damn

Darnel[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Old English darnel, dernel, of uncertain origin; compare dial French darnelle, Swedish dår-repe; perhaps named from a supposed intoxicating quality of the plant, and akin to Swedish dåra to infatuate, Old Dutch door foolish, German thor fool, and Ee.(?) dizzy

Noun[edit]

  1. (Botany): Any grass of the genus Lolium, especially the Lolium temulentum (bearded darnel), the grains of which have been reputed poisonous. Other species, as Lolium perenne (rye grass or ray grass), and its variety Lolium italicum (Italian rye grass), are highly esteemed for pasture and for making hay. ===Note===
  • Under darnel our early herbalists comprehended all kinds of cornfield weeds. - Dr. Prior

Darner[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. One who mends by darning.

Darnex[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. Variant of dornick

Darnic[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. Variant of dornick

Daroo[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. (Botany): The Egyptian sycamore Ficus sycamorus. See sycamore

Darr[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. (Zoölogy): The European black tern.

Darraign[edit]

Variants[edit]

Darrain

Etymology[edit]

Old French deraisnier to explain, defend, to maintain in legal action by proof and reasonings, Late Latin derationare; de- + rationare to discourse, contend in law, from Latin ratio reason, in Late Latin, legal cause. Compare arraign, and see reason

Transitive verb[edit]

  1. (Obsolete): To make ready to fight; to array.
    Quotations
    • Darraign your battle, for they are at hand. - Shakespeare, Henry VI Part III, II-ii
  2. (Obsolete): To fight out; to contest; to decide by combat
    Quotations

Darrain[edit]

Transitive verb[edit]

  1. Variant of Darraign

Darrein[edit]

Adjective[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Old French darrein, darrain, from an assumed Late Latin deretranus; Latin de + retro back, backward

  1. (Law): Last; as, darrein continuance, the last continuance.

Dartars[edit]

Etymology[edit]

French dartre eruption, dandruff

Noun[edit]

  1. A kind of scab or ulceration on the skin of lambs.

Darter[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. One who darts, or who throw darts; that which darts.
  2. (Zoölogy): The snakebird, a water bird of the genus Plotus; -- so called because it darts out its long, snakelike neck at its prey. See snakebird.
  3. (Zoölogy): A small fresh-water etheostomoid fish. The group includes numerous genera and species, all of them American

Dartingly[edit]

Adverb[edit]

  1. Like a dart; rapidly.

Dartle[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Frequentative of dart

Transitive and Intransitive verb[edit]

  1. To pierce or shoot through; to dart repeatedly
    Quotations
    • My star that dartles the red and the blue. - R. Browning

Dartoic[edit]

Adjective[edit]

  1. (Anatomy): Of or pertaining to the dartos

Dartoid[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Dartos + -oid

Adjective[edit]

  1. (Anatomy): Like the dartos; dartoic; as, dartoid tissue.

Dartos[edit]

Etymology[edit]

New Latin, from Greek flayed

Noun[edit]

  1. (Anatomy): A thin layer of peculiar contractile tissue directly beneath the skin of the scrotum.

Dartrous[edit]

Etymology[edit]

French dartreux. See dartars

Adjective[edit]

  1. (Medicine): Relating to, or partaking of the nature of, the disease called tetter; herpetic

Derived expression[edit]

  • Dartrous diathesis, A morbid condition of the system predisposing to the development of certain skin diseases, such as eczema, psoriasis, and pityriasis. Also called rheumic diathesis, and hipretism - Piffard

Darwinian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Eponymous from the name of Charles Darwin, an English scientist

Adjective[edit]

  1. Pertaining to Darwin; as, the Darwinian theory, a theory of the manner and cause of the development of living things from certain original forms or elements as put forth in his 1859 in a work, The Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection." See Development theory, under development

Noun[edit]

  1. An advocate of Darwinism

Darwinianism[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. Variant of Darwinism

Darwinism[edit]

Variant[edit]

Darwinianism

Noun[edit]

  1. (Biology): The theory or doctrines put forth by Darwin. - Huxley

Dase[edit]

Transitive verb[edit]

  1. (Obsolete): See daze - Chaucer

Dasewe[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Old English dasewen, daswen; compare Anglo Saxon dysegian to be foolish

Intransitive verb[edit]

  1. (Obsolete): To become dim-sighted; to become dazed or dazzled. - Chauscer

Dash[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Of Scandinavian origin; compare Danish daske to beat, strike, Swedish and Icelandic daska, Danish and Swedish dask blow

Transitive verb[edit]

Imperfect and past participle: dashed
Present participle: dashing

  1. To throw with violence or haste; to cause to strike violently or hastily; -- often used with against.
    Quotations
    • If you dash a stone against a stone in the botton of the water, it maketh a sound. - Bacon
  2. To break, as by throwing or by collision; to shatter; to crust; to frustrate; to ruin.
    Quotations
    • Thou shalt dash them in pieces like a potter's vessel. - Psalms 2:9
    • A brave vessel, . . . Dashed all to pieces. - Shakespeare, Tempest, I-ii
    • To perplex and dash Maturest counsels. - Milton.
  3. To put to shame; to confound; to confuse; to abash; to depress. - South
    Quotations
    • Dash the proud gameser in his gilded car. - Pope
  4. To throw in or on in a rapid, careless manner; to mix, reduce, or adulterate, by throwing in something of an inferior quality; to overspread partially; to bespatter; to touch here and there; as, to dash wine with water; to dash paint upon a picture.
    Quotations
    • I take care to dash the character with such particular circumstance as may prevent ill-natured applications. - Addison
    • The very source and fount of day Is dashed with wandering isles of night. - Tennyson
  5. To form or sketch rapidly or carelessly; to execute rapidly, or with careless haste; -- with off; as, to dash off a review or sermon.
  6. To erase by a stroke; to strike out; knock out; -- with out; as, to dash out a word.

Intransitive verb[edit]

  1. To rust with violence; to move impetuously; to strike violently; as, the waves dash upon rocks.
    Quotations
    • [He] dashed through thick and thin. - Dryden
    • On each hand the gushing waters play, And down the rough cascade all dashing fall. - Thomson

Noun[edit]

  1. Violent striking together of two bodies; collision; crash.
  2. A sudden check; abashment; frustration; ruin; as, his hopes received a dash.
  3. A slight admixture, infusion, or adulteration; a partial overspreading; as, wine with a dash of water; red with a dash of purple.
    Quotations
    • Innocence when it has in it a dash of folly. - Addison
  4. A rapid movement, esp. one of short duration; a quick stroke or blow; a sudden onset or rush; as, a bold dash at the enemy; a dash of rain.
    Quotations
    • She takes upon her bravely at first dash. - Shakespeare, Henry VI Part I, I-ii
  5. Energy in style or action; animation; spirit.
  6. (Low): A vain show; a blustering parade; a flourish; as, to make or cut a great dash.
  7. (Punctuation): A mark or line [--], in writing or printing, denoting a sudden break, stop, or transition in a sentence, or an abrupt change in its construction, a long or significant pause, or an unexpected or epigrammatic turn of sentiment. Dashes are also sometimes used instead of marks or parenthesis. - John Wilson
  8. (Music): The sign of staccato, a small mark denoting that the note over which it is placed is to be performed in a short, distinct manner
  9. (Music): The line drawn through a figure in the thorough bass, as a direction to raise the interval a semitone.
  10. (Racing): A short, spirited effort or trial of speed upon a race course; -- used in horse racing, when a single trial constitutes the race.

Dashboard[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. A board placed on the fore part of a carriage, sleigh, or other vechicle, to intercept water, mud, or snow, thrown up by the heels of the horses; -- in England commonly called splashboard
  2. The instrument panel of an automobile
  3. (Nautical): The float of a paddle wheel
  4. (Nautical): A screen at the bow af a steam launch to keep off the spray; -- called also sprayboard

Dasher[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. That which dashes or agitates; as, the dasher of a churn.
  2. (U.S.): A dashboard or splashboard.
  3. (Low): One who makes an ostentatious parade

Dashing[edit]

Adjective[edit]

  1. Bold; spirited; showy.
    Quotations
    • The dashing and daring spirit is preferable to the listless. - T. Campbell

Dashingly[edit]

Adverb[edit]

  1. (Colloquial): Conspicuously; showily
    Quotations

Dashism[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. (Rare and Colloquial): The character of making ostentatious or blustering parade or show.
    Quotations
    • He must fight a duel before his claim to . . . dashism can be universally allowed. - V. Knox

Dashpot[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. (Machines): A pneumatic or hydraulic cushion for a falling weight, as in the valve gear of a steam engine, to prevent shock. It consists of a chamber, containing air or a liquid, in which a piston, attached to the weight, falls freely until it enters a space from which the air or liquid can escape but slowly, when its fall is gradually checked. A cataract of an engine is sometimes called a dashpot.

Dashy[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From dash

Adjective[edit]

  1. (Colloquial): Calculated to arrest attention; ostentatiously fashionable; showy

Dastard[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Probably from Icelandic dæstr exhausted. breathless, past participle of dæsa to groan, lose one's breath; compare. dasask to become exhausted, and English daze

Noun[edit]

  1. One who meanly shrinks from danger; an arrant coward; a poltroon.
    Quotations
    • You are all recreants and dastards, and delight to live in slavery to the nobility. - Shakespeare, Henry VI Part II, IV-viii

Adjective[edit]

  1. Meanly shrinking from danger; cowardly; dastardly
    Quotations

Transitive verb[edit]

  1. (Rare): To dastardize. - Dryden

Dastardize[edit]

Transitive verb[edit]

Imperfect and past participle: dastardized
Present participle: dastardizing

  1. To make cowardly; to intimidate; to dispirit; as, to dastardize my courage. - Dryden

Dastardliness[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. The quality of being dastardly; cowardice; base fear.

Dastardly[edit]

Adjective[edit]

  1. Meanly timid; cowardly; base; as, a dastardly outrage.

Dastardness[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. Dastardliness.

Dastardy[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. Base timidity; cowardliness.

Daswe[edit]

Intransitive verb[edit]

  1. (Obsolete): See dasewe - Chaucer

Dasymeter[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Greek rough, thick + -meter

Noun[edit]

  1. (Physics): An instrument for testing the density of gases, consisting of a thin glass globe, which is weighed in the gas or gases, and then in an atmosphere of known density

Dasypaedal[edit]

Adjective[edit]

  1. (Zoölogy): dasypaedic

Dasypaedes[edit]

Etymology[edit]

New Latin, from Greek hairy, shaggy + a child

Plural noun[edit]

  1. (Zoölogy): Those birds whose young are covered with down when hatched.

Dasypaedic[edit]

Adjective[edit]

  1. (Zoölogy): Pertaining to the Dasypaedes; ptilopaedic

Dasyure[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Greek thick, shaggy + tail: compare French dasyure

Noun[edit]

  1. (Zoölogy): A carnivorous marsupial quadruped of Australia, belonging to the genus Dasyurus. There are several species.

Dasyurine[edit]

Adjective[edit]

  1. (Zoölogy): Pertaining to, or like, the dasyures

Data[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Latin plural of datum

Plural noun[edit]

See datum.

Datable[edit]

Adjective[edit]

  1. That may be dated; having a known or ascertainable date.
    Quotations

Dataria[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Late Latin, from Latin datum given

Noun[edit]

  1. (Roman Catholic Church): Formerly, a part of the Roman chancery; now, a separate office from which are sent graces or favors, cognizable in foro externo, such as appointments to benefices. The name is derived from the word datum, given or dated (with the indications of the time and place of granting the gift or favor).

Datary[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Late Latin datarius. See dataria

Noun[edit]

  1. (Roman Catholic Church): An officer in the pope's court, having charge of the Dataria.
  2. The office or employment of a datary.