Wiktionary:Webster 1913/666

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Hals[edit]

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

AS. <ets>heals</ets>; akin to D., G., & Goth. <ets>hals</ets>. See Collar.

  1. The neck or throat.</def> (Obsolete)
    QuotationsDo me hangen by the hals.

Chaucer.

Halse[edit]

Transitive verb[edit]

Etymology[edit]

AS. <ets>healsian</ets>.

  1. To embrace about the neck; to salute; to greet.</def> (Obsolete)
    Quotations

Each other kissed glad And lovely halst. Spenser.

  1. To adjure; to beseech; to entreat.</def> (Obsolete)
    Quotations

O dere child, I halse thee, In virtue of the Holy Trinity. Chaucer.

Halse[edit]

Transitive verb[edit]

Imperfect and past participle Halsed (h?lst);
Present participle: Halsing.]

Etymology[edit]

Cf. Hawser.

  1. To haul; to hoist.</def> (Obsolete)

Halsening[edit]

Adjective[edit]

  1. Sounding harshly in the throat; inharmonious; rough.</def> (Obsolete)

Carew.

Halser[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. See Hawser.

Pope.

Halt[edit]

  1. 3d pers. sing. pres. of Hold, contraction for holdeth.</def> (Obsolete)

Chaucer.

Halt[edit]

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Formerly <ets>alt</ets>, It. <ets>alto</ets>, G. <ets>halt</ets>, fr. <ets>halten</ets> to hold. See Hold.

  1. A stop in marching or walking, or in any action; arrest of progress.
    Quotations

Without any halt they marched. Clarendon.

  1. Quotations

[Lovers] soon in passion's war contest, Yet in their march soon make a halt. Davenant.

Halt[edit]

Intransitive verb[edit]

Imperfect and past participle Halted;
Present participle: Halting.]

  1. To hold one's self from proceeding; to hold up; to cease progress; to stop for a longer or shorter period; to come to a stop; to stand still.
  2. To stand in doubt whether to proceed, or what to do; to hsitate; to be uncertain.
    Quotations

How long halt ye between two opinions? 1 Kings xviii. 21

Halt[edit]

Transitive verb[edit]

  1. (Mil.): To cause to cease marching; to stop; <as>as, the general <ex>halted</ex> his troops for refreshment</as>.

Halt[edit]

Adjective[edit]

Etymology[edit]

AS. <ets>healt</ets>; akin to OS., Dan., & Sw. <ets>halt</ets>, Icel. <ets>haltr</ets>, <ets>halltr</ets>, Goth. <ets>halts</ets>, OHG. <ets>halz</ets>.

  1. Halting or stopping in walking; lame.
    Quotations

Bring in hither the poor, and the maimed, and the halt, and the blind. Luke xiv. 21.

Halt[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. The act of limping; lameness.

Halt[edit]

Intransitive verb[edit]

Etymology[edit]

OE. <ets>halten</ets>, AS. <ets>healtian</ets>. See Halt, a.

  1. To walk lamely; to limp.
  2. To have an irregular rhythm; to be defective.
    Quotations

The blank verse shall halt for it. Shak.

Halter[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. One who halts or limps a cripple.

Halter[edit]

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

OE. <ets>halter</ets>, <ets>helter</ets>, <ets>helfter</ets>, AS. <ets>hælftre</ets>; akin to G. <ets>halfter</ets>, D. <ets>halfter</ets>, <ets>halster</ets>, and also to E. <ets>helve</ets>. See Helve.

  1. A strong strap or cord. Especially: <sd>(a)</sd> A rope or strap, with or without a headstall, for leading or tying a horse. <sd>(b)</sd> A rope for hanging malefactors; a noose.

Shak.

  1. Quotations

No man e'er felt the halter draw With good opinion of the law. Trumbull.

Halter[edit]

Transitive verb[edit]

Imperfect and past participle Haltered ;
Present participle: Haltering.]

  1. To tie by the neck with a rope, strap, or halter; to put a halter on; to subject to a hangman's halter.</def> A haltered neck."

Shak.

Halteres[edit]

n. pl.

Etymology[edit]

NL., fr. Gr. weights used in jumping, fr. to leap.

  1. (Zoöl.): Balancers; the rudimentary hind wings of Diptera.

Halter-sack[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. A term of reproach, implying that one is fit to be hanged. (Obsolete) Beau. & Fl.

Haltingly[edit]

adv. <def>In a halting or limping manner.

Halvans[edit]

n. pl. <fld>(Mining): Impure ore; dirty ore.

Halve[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. A half.</def> (Obsolete)

Chaucer.

Halve[edit]

Transitive verb[edit]

Imperfect and past participle Halved ;
Present participle: Halving.]

Etymology[edit]

From Half.

  1. To divide into two equal parts; <as>as, to <ex>halve</ex> an apple</as>; to be or form half of.
    Quotations

So far apart their lives are thrown From the twin soul that halves their own. M. Arnold.

  1. (Arch.): To join, as two pieces of timber, by cutting away each for half its thickness at the joining place, and fitting together.

Halved[edit]

Adjective[edit]

  1. Appearing as if one side, or one half, were cut away; dimidiate.

Halves[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. pl. of Half.
  • By halves</col>, <cd>by one half at once; halfway; fragmentarily; partially; incompletely.</cd></cs>
  1. Quotations

I can not believe by halves; either I have faith, or I have it not. J. H. Newman.

  • To go halves</col>. <cd>See under Go.</cd></cs>

Halwe[edit]

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

OE., fr. AS. <ets>h&amacr;lga</ets>. See Holy.

  1. A saint.</def> (Obsolete)

Chaucer.

Hal'yard[edit]

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

<ets>Hale</ets>, v. t. + <ets>yard</ets>.

  1. (Naut.): A rope or tackle for hoisting or lowering yards, sails, flags, etc.</def> <altsp>[Written also <asp>halliard</asp>, <asp>haulyard</asp>.]</altsp>

Halysites[edit]

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

NL., fr. Gr. a chain.

  1. (Paleon.): A genus of Silurian fossil corals; the chain corals. See <cref>Chain coral</cref>, under Chain.

Hamadryad[edit]

Noun[edit]

<plu>pl. E. <plw>Hamadryads</plw> (#), L. <plw>Hamadryades</plw> (#)</plu>. <ety>[L. <ets>Hamadryas</ets>, <ets>-adis</ets>, Gr. ; together + oak, tree: cf. F. <ets>hamadryade</ets>. See Same, and Tree.

  1. (Class. Myth.): A tree nymph whose life ended with that of the particular tree, usually an oak, which had been her abode.
  2. (Zoöl.): A large venomous East Indian snake (<spn>Orhiophagus bungarus</spn>), allied to the cobras.

Hamadryas[edit]

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

L., a hamadryad. See Hamadryad.

  1. (Zoöl.): The sacred baboon of Egypt (<spn>Cynocephalus Hamadryas</spn>).

Hamamelis[edit]

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

NL., fr. Gr. a kind of medlar or service tree; at the same time + an apple, any tree fruit.

  1. (Bot.): A genus of plants which includes the witch-hazel (<spn>Hamamelis Virginica</spn>), a preparation of which is used medicinally.

Hamate[edit]

Adjective[edit]

Etymology[edit]

L. <ets>hamatus</ets>, fr. <ets>hamus</ets> hook.

  1. Hooked; bent at the end into a hook; hamous.

Hamated[edit]

Adjective[edit]

  1. Hooked, or set with hooks; hamate.

Swift.

Hamatum

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

NL., fr. L. <ets>hamatus</ets> hooked.

  1. (Anat.): See Unciform.

Hamble

Transitive verb[edit]

Etymology[edit]

OE. <ets>hamelen</ets> to mutilate, AS. <ets>hamelian</ets>; akin to OHG. <ets>hamaln</ets> to mutilate, <ets>hamal</ets> mutilated, <ets>ham</ets> mutilated, Icel. <ets>hamla</ets> to mutilate. Cf.Hamer to fetter.

  1. To hamstring.</def> (Obsolete)

Hamburg

Noun[edit]

  1. A commercial city of Germany, near the mouth of the Elbe.
  • Black Hamburg grape</col>. <cd>See under Black.</cd>
  • Hamburg dging</col>, <cd>a kind of embroidered work done by machinery on cambric or muslin; -- used for trimming.</cd>
  • Hamburg lake</col>, <cd>a purplish crimson pigment resembling cochineal.</cd></cs>

Hame

Noun[edit]

  1. Home.</def> [Scot. & O. Eng.]

Hame

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Scot. <ets>haims</ets>, <ets>hammys</ets>, <ets>hems</ets>, OE. <ets>ham</ets>; cf. D. <ets>haam</ets>.

  1. One of the two curved pieces of wood or metal, in the harness of a draught horse, to which the traces are fastened. They are fitted upon the collar, or have pads fitting the horse's neck attached to them.

Hamel

Transitive verb[edit]

(Obsolete) <def>Same as Hamele.

Hamesecken, Hamesucken

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

AS. <ets>h&amacr;mscn</ets>. See Home, and Seek.

  1. (Scots Law): The felonious seeking and invasion of a person in his dwelling house.

Bouvier.

Hamiform

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

L. <ets>hamus</ets> hook + <ets>-form</ets>.

  1. Hook-shaped.

Hamilton period

. <fld>(Geol.): A subdivision of the Devonian system of America; -- so named from Hamilton, Madison Co., New York. It includes the Marcellus, Hamilton, and Genesee epochs or groups. See the Chart of Geology.

Haminura

Noun[edit]

  1. (Zoöl.): A large edible river fish (<spn>Erythrinus macrodon</spn>) of Guiana.

Hamite

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

L. <ets>hamus</ets> hook.

  1. (Paleon.): A fossil cephalopod of the genus <spn>Hamites</spn>, related to the ammonites, but having the last whorl bent into a hooklike form.

Hamite

Noun[edit]

  1. A descendant of Ham, Noah's second son. See Gen. x. 6-20.

Haitic

Adjective[edit]

  1. Pertaining to Ham or his descendants.
  • Hamitic languages</col>, <cd>the group of languages spoken mainly in the Sahara, Egypt, Galla, and Som&acir;li Land, and supposed to be allied to the Semitic.</cd></cs>

Keith Johnson.

Hamlet

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

OWE. <ets>hamelet</ets>, OF. <ets>hamelet</ets>, dim. of <ets>hamel</ets>, F. <ets>hameau</ets>, LL. <ets>hamellum</ets>, a dim. of German origin; cf. G. <ets>heim</ets> home. &root;220. See Home.

  1. A small village; a little cluster of houses in the country.
    Quotations

The country wasted, and the hamlets burned. Dryden.

<syn>Syn. -- Village; neighborhood. See Village.</syn>

Hamleted

p. a. <def>Confined to a hamlet.

Feltham.

Hammer

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

OE. <ets>hamer</ets>, AS. <ets>hamer</ets>, <ets>hamor</ets>; akin to D. <ets>hamer</ets>, G. & Dan. <ets>hammer</ets>, Sw. <ets>hammare</ets>, Icel. <ets>hamarr</ets>, hammer, crag, and perh. to Gr. anvil, Skr. <ets>aman</ets> stone.

  1. An instrument for driving nails, beating metals, and the like, consisting of a head, usually of steel or iron, fixed crosswise to a handle.
    Quotations

With busy hammers closing rivets up. Shak.

  1. Something which in firm or action resembles the common hammer</def>; as: <sd>(a)</sd> <def>That part of a clock which strikes upon the bell to indicate the hour</def>. <sd>(b)</sd> <def>The padded mallet of a piano, which strikes the wires, to produce the tones</def>. <sd>(c)</sd> <fld>(Anat.): The malleus</def>. See under Ear. <fld>(Gun.): That part of a gunlock which strikes the percussion cap, or firing pin; the cock; formerly, however, a piece of steel covering the pan of a flintlock musket and struck by the flint of the cock to ignite the priming</def>. <sd>(e)</sd> <def>Also, a person of thing that smites or shatters; <as>as, St. Augustine was the <ex>hammer</ex> of heresies.</as>
    Quotations

He met the stern legionaries [of Rome] who had been the massive iron hammers" of the whole earth. J. H. Newman.

  • Atmospheric hammer</col>, <cd>a dead-stroke hammer in which the spring is formed by confined air.</cd> -- <mcol><col>Drop hammer</col>, <col>Face hammer</col></mcol>, <cd>etc. See under Drop, Face, etc.</cd>
  • Hammer fish</col>. <cd>See Hammerhead.</cd>
  • Hammer hardening</col>, <cd>the process of hardening metal by hammering it when cold.</cd>
  • Hammer shell</col> <fld>(Zoöl.)</fld>, <cd>any species of <spn>Malleus</spn>, a genus of marine bivalve shells, allied to the pearl oysters, having the wings narrow and elongated, so as to give them a hammer-shaped outline; -- called also <altname>hammer oyster</altname>.</cd>
  • To bring to the hammer</col>, <cd>to put up at auction.</cd></cs>

Hammer

Transitive verb[edit]

Imperfect and past participle Hammered ;
Present participle: Hammering.]

  1. To beat with a hammer; to beat with heavy blows; <as>as, to <ex>hammer</ex> iron</as>.
  2. To form or forge with a hammer; to shape by beating.</def> Hammered money."

Dryden.

  1. To form in the mind; to shape by hard intellectual labor; -- usually with out.
    Quotations

Who was hammering out a penny dialogue. Jeffry.

Hammer

Intransitive verb[edit]

  1. To be busy forming anything; to labor hard as if shaping something with a hammer.
    Quotations

Whereon this month I have hammering. Shak.

  1. To strike repeated blows, literally or figuratively.
    Quotations

Blood and revenge are hammering in my head. Shak.

Hammerable

Adjective[edit]

  1. Capable of being formed or shaped by a hammer.

Sherwood.

Hammer-bm

Noun[edit]

  1. (Cothic Arch.): A member of one description of roof truss, called hammer-beam truss, which is so framed as not to have a tiebeam at the top of the wall. Each principal has two hammer-beams, which occupy the situation, and to some extent serve the purpose, of a tiebeam.

Hammercloth

(?; 115), n. <ety>[Prob. fr. D. <ets>hemel</ets> heaven, canopy, tester (akin to G. <ets>himmel</ets>, and perh. also to E. <ets>heaven</ets>) + E. <ets>cloth</ets>; or perh. a corruption of <ets>hamper cloth</ets>.

  1. The cloth which covers a coach box.

Hammer-dressed

Adjective[edit]

  1. Having the surface roughly shaped or faced with the stonecutter's hammer; -- said of building stone.

Hammerer

Noun[edit]

  1. One who works with a hammer.

Hammer-harden

Transitive verb[edit]

  1. To harden, as a metal, by hammering it in the cold state.