Wiktionary:Webster 1913/669

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Page 669

Hanging[edit]

Adjective[edit]

  1. Requiring, deserving, or foreboding death by the halter. What a hanging face!" Dryden.
  2. Suspended from above; pendent; as, hanging shelves.

3. Adapted for sustaining a hanging object; as, the hanging post of a gate, the post which holds the hinges. Hanging compass, a compass suspended so that the card may be read from beneath. -- Hanging garden, a garden sustained at an artificial elevation by any means, as by the terraces at Babylon. -- Hanging indentation. See under Indentation. -- Hanging rail (Arch.), that rail of a door or casement to which hinges are attached. -- Hanging side (Mining), the overhanging side of an inclined or hading vein. -- Hanging sleeves. (a) Strips of the same stuff as the gown, hanging down the back from the shoulders. (b) Loose, flowing sleeves. -- Hanging stile. (Arch.) (a) That stile of a door to which hinges are secured. (b) That upright of a window frame to which casements are hinged, or in which the pulleys for sash windows are fastened. -- Hanging wall (Mining), the upper wall of inclined vein, or that which hangs over the miner's head when working in the vein.

Hanging[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. The act of suspending anything; the state of being suspended.
  2. Death by suspension; execution by a halter.
  3. That which is hung as lining or drapery for the walls of a room, as tapestry, paper, etc., or to cover or drape a door or window; -- used chiefly in the plural.

Nor purple hangings clothe the palace walls. Dryden.

Hangman[edit]

Noun[edit]

Plural: Hangmen

  1. One who hangs another; esp., one who makes a business of hanging; a public executioner; -- sometimes used as a term of reproach, without reference to office. Shak.

Hangmanship[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. The office or character of a hangman.

Hangnail[edit]

Noun[edit]

[A corruption of agnail.] A small piece or silver of skin which hangs loose, near the root of finger nail. Holloway.

Hangnest[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. A nest that hangs like a bag or pocket.
  2. A bird which builds such a nest; a hangbird.

Hank[edit]

Noun[edit]

[Cf. Dan. hank handle, Sw. hank a band or tie, Icel. hanki hasp, clasp, hönk, hangr, hank, coil, skein, G. henkel, henk, handle; ar prob. akin to E. hang. See Hang.]

  1. A parcel consisting of two or more skeins of yarn or thread tied together.
  2. A rope or withe for fastening a gate. [Prov. Eng.]
  3. Hold; influence.

When the devil hath got such a hank over him. Bp. Sanderson.

  1. (Naut.) A ring or eye of rope, wood, or iron, attached to the edge of a sail and running on a stay.

Hank[edit]

Transitive verb[edit]

[OE. hanken.]

  1. To fasten with a rope, as a gate. [Prov. Eng.] Wright.
  2. To form into hanks.

Hanker[edit]

Intransitive verb[edit]

[Imperfect and past participle: Hankered ;
Present participle Hankering.] [Prob. fr. hang; cf. D. hunkeren, hengelen.]

1. To long (for) with a keen appetite and uneasiness; to have a vehement desire; -- usually with for or after; as, to hanker after fruit; to hanker after the diversions of the town. Addison. He was hankering to join his friend. J. A. Symonds.

2. To linger in expectation or with desire. Thackeray.

Hankeringly[edit]

Adjverb[edit]

In a hankering manner.

Hankey-pankey[edit]

Noun[edit]

[Cf. Hocus-pocus.] Professional cant; the chatter of conjurers to divert attention from their tricks; hence, jugglery. [Colloq.]

Hanoverian[edit]

Adjective[edit]

Of or pertaining to Hanover or its people, or to the House of Hanover in England.

Hanoverian[edit]

Noun[edit]

A native or naturalized inhabitant of Hanover; one of the House of Hanover.

Han sa[edit]

Noun[edit]

See 2d Hanse.

Hansard[edit]

Noun[edit]

An official report of proceedings in the British Parliament; -- so called from the name of the publishers.

Hansard[edit]

Noun[edit]

A merchant of one of the Hanse towns. See the Note under 2d Hanse.

Hanse[edit]

Noun[edit]

[Cf. F. anse handle, anse de panier surbased arch, flat arch, vault, and E. haunch hip.] (Arch.) That part of an elliptical or many-centered arch which has the shorter radius and immediately adjoins the impost.

Hanse[edit]

Noun[edit]

[G. hanse, or F. hanse (from German), OHG. & Goth. hansa; akin to AS. hs band, troop.] An association; a league or confederacy. Hanse towns (Hist.), certain commercial cities in Germany which associated themselves for the protection and enlarging of their commerce. The confederacy, called also Hansa and Hanseatic league , held its first diet in 1260, and was maintained for nearly four hundred years. At one time the league comprised eighty-five cities. Its remnants, L\'81beck, Hamburg, and Bremen, are free cities, and are still frequently called Hanse towns.

Hanseatic[edit]

Adjective[edit]

Pertaining to the Hanse towns, or to their confederacy. Hanseatic league. See under 2d Hanse.

Hansel[edit]

Noun and verb[edit]

See Handsel.

Hanselines[edit]

Noun[edit]

A sort of breeches. [Obs..] Chaucer.

Hansom, Hansom cab[edit]

Noun[edit]

[From the name of the inventor.] A light, low, two-wheeled covered carriage with the driver's seat elevated behind, the reins being passed over the top.

He hailed a cruising hansom . . . 'Tis the gondola of London," said Lothair. Beaconsfield.

Han't[edit]

  1. A contraction of have not, or has not, used in illiterate speech. In the United States the commoner spelling is hain't.

Hanuman[edit]

Noun[edit]

See Hoonoomaun.

Hap[edit]

Transitive verb[edit]

[OE.happen.] To clothe; to wrap. The surgeon happed her up carefully. Dr. J. Brown.

Hap[edit]

Noun[edit]

[Cf. Hap to clothe.] A cloak or plaid. [O. Eng. & Scot.]

Hap[edit]

Noun[edit]

[Icel. happ unexpected good luck. .] That which happens or comes suddenly or unexpectedly; also, the manner of occurrence or taking place; chance; fortune; accident; casual event; fate; luck; lot. Chaucer. Whether art it was or heedless hap. Spenser. Cursed be good haps, and cursed be they that build Their hopes on haps. Sir P. Sidney. Loving goes by haps: Some Cupid kills with arrows, some with traps. Shak.

Hap[edit]

Intransitive verb[edit]

[OE. happen. See Hap chance, and cf. Happen.] To happen; to befall; to chance. Chaucer. Sends word of all that haps in Tyre. Shak.

Hap'penny[edit]

Noun[edit]

A half-penny.

Haphazard[edit]

Noun[edit]

[Hap + hazard.] Extra hazard; chance; accident; random. We take our principles at haphazard, upon trust. Locke.

Hapless[edit]

Adjective[edit]

Without hap or luck; luckless; unfortunate; unlucky; unhappy; as, hapless youth; hapless maid. Dryden.

Haplessly[edit]

Adjverb[edit]

In a hapless, unlucky manner.

Haplomi[edit]

Noun[edit]

pl. [NL., fr. Gr. simple + shoulder.] (Zoöl.) An order of freshwater fishes, including the true pikes, cyprinodonts, and blindfishes.

Hallostemonous[edit]

Adjective[edit]

[Gr. simple + a thread.] (Bot.) Having but one series of stamens, and that equal in number to the proper number of petals; isostemonous.

Haply[edit]

Adjverb[edit]

By hap, chance, luck, or accident; perhaps; it may be. Lest haply ye be found even to fight against God. Acts v. 39.

Happed[edit]

Past participle[edit]

[From 1st Hap.] Wrapped; covered; cloaked. [Scot.] All happed with flowers in the green wood were. Hogg.

Happen[edit]

Intransitive verb[edit]

[Imperfect and past participle: Happened ;
Present participle Happening.] [OE. happenen, hapnen. See Hap to happen.]

1. To come by chance; to come without previous expectation; to fall out. There shall no evil happen to the just. Prov. xii. 21. 2. To take place; to occur. All these things which had happened. Luke xxiv. 14. To happen on, to meet with; to fall or light upon. I have happened on some other accounts." Graunt. -- To happen in, to make a casual call. [Colloq.]

Happily[edit]

Adjverb[edit]

[From Happy.] 1. By chance; peradventure; haply. [Obs.] Piers Plowman. 2. By good fortune; fortunately; luckily. Preferred by conquest, happily o'erthrown. Waller. 3. In a happy manner or state; in happy circumstances; as, he lived happily with his wife. 4. With address or dexterity; gracefully; felicitously; in a manner to success; with success. Formed by thy converse, happily to steer From grave to gay, from lively to severe. Pope. Syn. -- Fortunately; luckily; successfully; prosperously; contentedly; dexterously; felicitously.


Harangue[edit]

Noun[edit]

[F. harangue: cf. Sp. arenda, It. aringa; lit., a speech before a multitude or on the hustings, It. aringo arena, hustings, pulpit; all fr. OHG. hring ring, anything round, ring of people, G. ring. See Ring.] A speech addressed to a large public assembly; a popular oration; a loud address a multitude; in a bad sense, a noisy or pompous speech; declamation; ranting. Gray-headed men and grave, with warriors mixed, Assemble, and harangues are heard. Milton. Syn. -- Harangue, Speech, Oration. Speech is generic; an oration is an elaborate and rhetorical speech; an harangue is a vehement appeal to the passions, or a noisy, disputatious address. A general makes an harangue to his troops on the eve of a battle; a demagogue harangues the populace on the subject of their wrongs.

Harangue[edit]

Intransitive verb[edit]

[Imperfect and past participle: Harangued ;
Present participle Haranguing.] [Cf. F. haranguer, It. aringare.] To make an harangue; to declaim.

Harangue[edit]

Transitive verb[edit]

To address by an harangue.

Harangueful[edit]

Adjective[edit]

Full of harangue.

Haranguer[edit]

Noun[edit]

One who harangues, or is fond of haranguing; a declaimer. With them join'd all th' harangues of the throng, That thought to get preferment by the tongue. Dryden.

Harass[edit]

Transitive verb[edit]

[Imperfect and past participle: Harassed ;
Present participle Harassing.] [F. harasser; cf. OF. harace a basket made of cords, harace, harasse,a very heavy and large shield; or harer to set (a dog) on.] To fatigue; to tire with repeated and exhausting efforts; esp., to weary by importunity, teasing, or fretting; to cause to endure excessive burdens or anxieties; -- sometimes followed by out. [Troops] harassed with a long and wearisome march. Bacon. Nature oppressed and harass'd out with care. Addison. Vext with lawyers and harass'd with debt. Tennyson. Syn. -- To weary; jade; tire; perplex; distress; tease; worry; disquiet; chafe; gall; annoy; irritate; plague; vex; molest; trouble; disturb; torment.

Harass[edit]

1. Devastation; waste. [Obs.] Milton. 2. Worry; harassment. [R.] Byron.

Harasser[edit]

Noun[edit]

One who harasses.

Harassment[edit]

Noun[edit]

The act of harassing, or state of being harassed; worry; annoyance; anxiety. Little harassments which I am led to suspect do occasionally molest the most fortunate. Ld. Lytton.

Harberous[edit]

Adjective[edit]

Harborous. [Obs.] A bishop must be faultless, the husband of one wife, honestly appareled, harberous. Tyndale (1 Tim. iii. 2)

Harbinger[edit]

Noun[edit]

[OE. herbergeour, OF. herbergeor one who provides lodging, fr. herbergier to provide lodging, F. héberger, OF. herberge lodging, inn, F. auberge; of German origin. See Harbor.]

1. One who provides lodgings; especially, the officer of the English royal household who formerly preceded the court when traveling, to provide and prepare lodgings. Fuller.

2. A forerunner; a precursor; a messenger. I knew by these harbingers who were coming. Landor.

Harbinger[edit]

Transitive verb[edit]

[Imperfect and past participle: Harbingered ;
Present participle Harbingering.] To usher in; to be a harbinger of. Thus did the star of religious freedom harbinger the day." Bancroft.

Harbor[edit]

Noun[edit]

[Written also harbour.] [OE herbor, herberwe, herberge, Icel. herbergi (cf. OHG. heriberga), orig., a shelter for soldiers; herr army + bjarga to save, help, defend; akin to AS. here army, G. heer, OHG. heri, Goth. harjis, and AS. beorgan to save, shelter, defend, G. bergen. See Harry, 2d Bury, and cf. Harbinger.] 1. A station for rest and entertainment; a place of security and comfort; a refuge; a shelter. [A grove] fair harbour that them seems. Spenser. For harbor at a thousand doors they knocked. Dryden. 2. Specif.: A lodging place; an inn. [Obs.] Chaucer. 3. (Astrol.) The mansion of a heavenly body. [Obs.] 4. A portion of a sea, a lake, or other large body of water, either landlocked or artificially protected so as to be a place of safety for vessels in stormy weather; a port or haven.