Wiktionary:Webster 1913/669

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Page 669

Hanging[edit]

Hanging compass, a compass suspended so that the card may be read from beneath. -- Hanging garden, a garden sustained at an artificial elevation by any means, as by the terraces at Babylon. -- Hanging indentation. See under Indentation. -- Hanging rail (Arch.), that rail of a door or casement to which hinges are attached. -- Hanging side (Mining), the overhanging side of an inclined or hading vein. -- Hanging sleeves. (a) Strips of the same stuff as the gown, hanging down the back from the shoulders. (b) Loose, flowing sleeves. -- Hanging stile. (Arch.) (a) That stile of a door to which hinges are secured. (b) That upright of a window frame to which casements are hinged, or in which the pulleys for sash windows are fastened. -- Hanging wall (Mining), the upper wall of inclined vein, or that which hangs over the miner's head when working in the vein.

Hansa[edit]

Noun[edit]

See 2d Hanse.

Hanse[edit]

Noun[edit]

[Cf. F. anse handle, anse de panier surbased arch, flat arch, vault, and E. haunch hip.] (Arch.) That part of an elliptical or many-centered arch which has the shorter radius and immediately adjoins the impost.

Hanse[edit]

Noun[edit]

[G. hanse, or F. hanse (from German), OHG. & Goth. hansa; akin to AS. hs band, troop.] An association; a league or confederacy. Hanse towns (Hist.), certain commercial cities in Germany which associated themselves for the protection and enlarging of their commerce. The confederacy, called also Hansa and Hanseatic league , held its first diet in 1260, and was maintained for nearly four hundred years. At one time the league comprised eighty-five cities. Its remnants, L\'81beck, Hamburg, and Bremen, are free cities, and are still frequently called Hanse towns.

Hanseatic[edit]

Adjective[edit]

Pertaining to the Hanse towns, or to their confederacy. Hanseatic league. See under 2d Hanse.

Hansel[edit]

Noun and verb[edit]

See Handsel.

Hanselines[edit]

Noun[edit]

A sort of breeches. [Obs..] Chaucer.

Hansom, Hansom cab[edit]

Noun[edit]

[From the name of the inventor.] A light, low, two-wheeled covered carriage with the driver's seat elevated behind, the reins being passed over the top.

He hailed a cruising hansom . . . 'Tis the gondola of London," said Lothair. Beaconsfield.

Han't[edit]

  1. A contraction of have not, or has not, used in illiterate speech. In the United States the commoner spelling is hain't.

Hanuman[edit]

Noun[edit]

See Hoonoomaun.

Hap[edit]

Transitive verb[edit]

[OE.happen.] To clothe; to wrap. The surgeon happed her up carefully. Dr. J. Brown.

Hap[edit]

Noun[edit]

[Cf. Hap to clothe.] A cloak or plaid. [O. Eng. & Scot.]

Hap[edit]

Noun[edit]

[Icel. happ unexpected good luck. .] That which happens or comes suddenly or unexpectedly; also, the manner of occurrence or taking place; chance; fortune; accident; casual event; fate; luck; lot. Chaucer. Whether art it was or heedless hap. Spenser. Cursed be good haps, and cursed be they that build Their hopes on haps. Sir P. Sidney. Loving goes by haps: Some Cupid kills with arrows, some with traps. Shak.

Hap[edit]

Intransitive verb[edit]

[OE. happen. See Hap chance, and cf. Happen.] To happen; to befall; to chance. Chaucer. Sends word of all that haps in Tyre. Shak.

Hap'penny[edit]

Noun[edit]

A half-penny.

Haphazard[edit]

Noun[edit]

[Hap + hazard.] Extra hazard; chance; accident; random. We take our principles at haphazard, upon trust. Locke.

Haplomi[edit]

Noun[edit]

pl. [NL., fr. Gr. simple + shoulder.] (Zoöl.) An order of freshwater fishes, including the true pikes, cyprinodonts, and blindfishes.

Hallostemonous[edit]

Adjective[edit]

[Gr. simple + a thread.] (Bot.) Having but one series of stamens, and that equal in number to the proper number of petals; isostemonous.