Wiktionary:Webster 1913/837

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page 837

Lazy continued[edit]

  • Lazy tongs, a system of jointed bars capable of great extension, originally made for picking up something at a distance, now variously applied in machinery.

Synonyms[edit]

Lazyback[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. (Colloquial): A support for the back, attached to the seat of a carriage.

Lazybones[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. (Colloquial): A lazy person.

Lazzaroni[edit]

Common misspelling[edit]

lazaroni

Etymology[edit]

Italian lazzarone, plural. lazzaroni

Plural noun[edit]

  1. The homeless idlers of Naples who live by chance work or begging; -- so called from the Hospital of St. Lazarus, which serves as their refuge

Lea[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Compare Lay, (noun - that which is laid)

Noun[edit]

  1. (Textile Manufacturing):
    (a) A measure of yarn; for linen, 300 yards; for cotton, 120 yards; a lay.
    (b) A set of warp threads carried by a loop of the heddle.

Lea[edit]

===Etymology===

Old English ley, lay, Anglo Saxon leáh, leá; akin to Provincial German lon bog, morass, grove, and perhaps to Latin lucus grove, English light, noun

Noun[edit]

  1. A meadow or sward land; a grassy field.
    Quotations
    • Plough-torn leas.- Shakespeare, Timon of Athens, IV-iii
    • The lowing herd wind slowly o'er the lea. - Gray.

Leach[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. (Nautical): See 3d Leech.

Leach[edit]

Variant spelling[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Compare Anglo Saxon leáh lye, German lauge. See lye

Noun[edit]

  1. A quantity of wood ashes, through which water passes, and thus imbibes the alkali.
  2. A tub or vat for leaching ashes, bark, etc.

Derived expressions[edit]

  • Leach tub: a wooden tub in which ashes are leached.

Leach[edit]

Variant spellings[edit]

leech, letch

Transitive verb[edit]

leach, leached, leaching

  1. To remove the soluble constituents from by subjecting to the action of percolating water or other liquid; as, to leach ashes or coffee.
  2. To dissolve out; -- often used with out; as, to leach out alkali from ashes.

Leach[edit]

Intransitive verb[edit]

  1. To part with soluble constituents by percolation.

Leach[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. (Obsolete): See Leech, a physician.

Leachy[edit]

Adjective[edit]

  1. Permitting liquids to pass by percolation; not capable of retaining water; porous; pervious; -- said of gravelly or sandy soils, and the like.

Leaden[edit]

Adjective[edit]

  1. Made of lead; of the nature of lead; as, a leaden ball.
  2. Like lead in color, etc. ; as, a leaden sky.
  3. Heavy; dull; sluggish. Leaden slumber." - Shakespeare, Richard III", V-iii

Leadership[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. The office of a leader.

Leadhillite[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. (Mineralogy): A mineral of a yellowish or greenish white color, consisting of the sulphate and carbonate of lead; -- so called from having been first found at Leadhills, Scotland.

Leading[edit]

Adjective[edit]

  1. Guiding; directing; controlling; foremost; as, a leading motive; a leading man; a leading example.

Derived forms[edit]

Derived expressions[edit]

  • Leading case, ;;(Law): a reported decision which has come to be regarded as settling the law of the question involved. Abbott. --
  • Leading motive, (a translation of German leitmotif, Music): a guiding theme; in the modern music drama of Wagner, a marked melodic phrase or short passage which always accompanies the reappearance of a certain person, situation, abstract idea, or allusion in the course of the play; a sort of musical label
  • Leading note, (Music): the seventh note or tone in the ascending major scale; the sensible note
  • Leading question: a question so framed as to guide the person questioned in making his reply
  • Leading strings: strings by which children are supported when beginning to walk
  • To be in leading strings: to be in a state of infancy or dependence, or under the guidance of others
  • Leading wheel: a wheel situated before the driving wheels of a locomotive engine.

Leading[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. The act of guiding, directing, governing, or enticing; guidance.
    Quotations
    • I shall no leading need.- Shakespeare, King Lear, IV-i
  2. (Archaic): Suggestion; hint; example. - FrancisBacon

Leadman[edit]

Noun[edit]

Plural Leadmen

  1. (Obsolete): One who leads a dance. - B. Jonson

Leadsman[edit]

Noun[edit]

Plural: Leadsmen

  1. (Nautical) The man who heaves the lead. - Totten.

Leadwort[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. (Botany): A genus of maritime herbs (Plumbago). P. europaea has lead-colored spots on the leaves, and nearly lead-colored flowers.

Leady[edit]

Adjective[edit]

  1. Resembling lead. - Sir T. Elyot

Leaf[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Old English leef, lef, leaf, Anglo Saxon. leáf; akin to Saxon lf, Old Friesian laf, Dutch loof foliage, German laub, Old High German loub leaf, foliage, Icelandic lauf, Swedish löf, Danish löv, Gothic laufs; compare Lithuanian lapas. Compare lodge.

Noun[edit]

Plural: Leaves

  1. (Botany) A colored, usually green, expansion growing from the side of a stem or rootstock, in which the sap for the use of the plant is elaborated under the influence of light; one of the parts of a plant which collectively constitute its foliage.
    Note: Such leaves usually consist of a blade, or lamina , supported upon a leafstalk or petiole, which, continued through the blade as the midrib, gives off woody ribs and veins that support the cellular texture. The petiole has usually some sort of an appendage on each side of its base, which is called the stipule. The green parenchyma of the leaf is covered with a thin epiderm pierced with closable microscopic openings, known as stomata.
  2. (Botany): A special organ of vegetation in the form of a lateral outgrowth from the stem, whether appearing as a part of the foliage, or as a cotyledon, a scale, a bract, a spine, or a tendril.
    Note: In this view every part of a plant, except the root and the stem, is either a leaf, or is composed of leaves more or less modified and transformed.
  3. Something which is like a leaf in being wide and thin and having a flat surface, or in being attached to a larger body by one edge or end; as :
    (a) A part of a book or folded sheet containing two pages upon its opposite sides.
    (b) A side, division, or part, that slides or is hinged, as of window shutters, folding doors, etc.
    (c) The movable side of a table.
    (d) A very thin plate; as, gold leaf.
    (e) A portion of fat lying in a separate fold or layer.
    (f) One of the teeth of a pinion, especially when small.

Derived expressions[edit]

  • Leaf beetle, (Zoölogy): any beetle which feeds upon leaves; especially, any species of the family Chrysomelidae, as the potato beetle and helmet beetle
  • Leaf bridge: a draw-bridge having a platform or leaf which swings vertically on hinges
  • Leaf bud, (Botany):, a bud which develops into leaves or a leafy branch
  • Leaf butterfly, (Zoölogy): any butterfly which, in the form and colors of its wings, resembles the leaves of plants upon which it rests; especially, butterflies of the genus Kallima, found in Southern Asia and the East Indies
  • Leaf crumpler, (Zoölogy): a small moth (Phycis indigenella), the larva of which feeds upon leaves of the apple tree, and forms its nest by crumpling and fastening leaves together in clusters
  • Leaf cutter, (Zoölogy): any one of various species of wild bees of the genus Megachile, which cut rounded pieces from the edges of leaves, or the petals of flowers, to be used in the construction of their nests, which are made in holes and crevices, or in a leaf rolled up for the purpose. Among the common American species are M. brevis and M. centuncularis. Called also rose-cutting bee
  • Leaf fat: the fat which lies in leaves or layers within the body of an animal
  • Leaf flea, (Zoölogy): a jumping plant louse of the family Psyllidae
  • Leaf frog, (Zoölogy): any tree frog of the genus Phyllomedusa
  • Leaf green,.(Botany): See chlorophyll
  • Leaf hopper, (Zoölogy): any small jumping hemipterous insect of the genus Tettigonia, and allied genera. They live upon the leaves and twigs of plants. See live hopper
  • Leaf insect, (Zoölogy): any one of several genera and species of orthopterous insects, especially of the genus Phyllium, in which the wings, and sometimes the legs, resemble leaves in color and form. They are common in Southern Asia and the East Indies
  • Leaf lard: lard from leaf fat. See under lard
  • Leaf louse, (Zoölogy): an aphid
  • Leaf metal:, metal in thin leaves, as gold, silver, or tin
  • Leaf miner, (Zoölogy): any one of various small lepidopterous and dipterous insects, which, in the larval stages, burrow in and eat the parenchyma of leaves; as, the pear-tree leaf miner (Lithocolletis geminatella)
  • Leaf notcher, (Zoölogy):, a pale bluish green beetle (Artipus floridanus), which, in Florida, eats the edges of the leaves of orange trees
  • Leaf roller, (Zoölogy): the larva of any tortricid moth which makes a nest by rolling up the leaves of plants. See tortrix
  • Leaf scar, (Botany): the cicatrix on a stem whence a leaf has fallen
  • Leaf sewer, (Zoölogy): a tortricid moth, whose caterpillar makes a nest by rolling up a leaf and fastening the edges together with silk, as if sewn; especially, Phoxopteris nubeculana, which feeds upon the apple tree
  • Leaf sight: a hinges sight on a firearm, which can be raised or folded down
  • Leaf spring: a spring made of flattened pieces of iron commonly used in motor vehicles.
  • Leaf trace, (Botany):, one or more fibrovascular bundles, which may be traced down an endogenous stem from the base of a leaf
  • Leaf tier, (Zoölogy): a tortricid moth whose larva makes a nest by fastening the edges of a leaf together with silk; especially, Teras cinderella, found on the apple tree
  • Leaf valve: a valve which moves on a hinge
  • Leaf wasp, (Zoölogy): a sawfly
  • To turn over a new leaf, (Colloquial): to make a radical change for the better in one's way of living or doing.
  1. Quotations
    • They were both determined to turn over a new leaf. - Richardson?