abate

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See also: Abate, abaté, abâte, abatē, and abatė

English[edit]

Wikisource
See also the 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica's article on:

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English abaten, borrowed from Old French abatre (to beat down) (possibly via Middle French), from Late Latin abbatto, from ab- (away) + batto, from Latin battuere (to beat). Cognate to modern French abattre.

Verb[edit]

abate (third-person singular simple present abates, present participle abating, simple past and past participle abated)

  1. (transitive, obsolete outside law) To put an end to; to cause to cease. [attested since about 1150 to 1350][1]
    to abate a nuisance
  2. (intransitive) To become null and void. [attested since the late 15th century][1]
    The writ has abated.
  3. (transitive, law) To nullify; make void. [attested since the late 15th century][1]
    to abate a writ
  4. (transitive, obsolete) To humble; to lower in status; to bring someone down physically or mentally. [attested from around 1150 to 1350 until the mid 1600s][1]
    • (Can we date this quote?) Geoffrey Chaucer
      The hyer that they were in this present lyf, the moore shulle they be abated and defouled in helle.
  5. (intransitive, obsolete) To be humbled; to be brought down physically or mentally. [attested from around 1150 to 1350 until the mid 1600s][1]
  6. (transitive, obsolete) To curtail; to deprive. [attested from around 1350 to 1470 until the mid 1800s][1]
    Order restrictions and prohibitions to abate an emergency situation.
  7. (transitive) To reduce in amount, size, or value. [attested since 1325][2][1]
    Legacies are liable to be abated entirely or in proportion, upon a deficiency of assets.
  8. (intransitive) To decrease in size, value, or amount. [attested since 1325][2]
  9. (transitive) To moderate; to lessen in force, intensity, to subside. [attested since around 1150 to 1350][1]
  10. (intransitive) To decrease in intensity or force; to subside. [attested since around 1150 to 1350][1]
  11. (transitive) To deduct or omit. [attested since around 1350 to 1470][1]
    We will abate this price from the total.
    • 1845, Thomas Fuller, The Church History of Britain[1], volume 3, page 100:
      Allowing nine thousand parishes (abating the odd hundreds) in England and Wales []
  12. (transitive) To bar or except. [attested since the late 1500s][1]
    • (Can we date this quote?) Samuel Johnson
      Abating his brutality, he was a very good master.
  13. (transitive) To cut away or hammer down, in such a way as to leave a figure in relief, as a sculpture, or in metalwork.
  14. (transitive, obsolete) To dull the edge or point of; to blunt. [attested from the mid 1500s till the late 1600s][1]
  15. (transitive, archaic) To destroy, or level to the ground. [attested since around 1350 to 1470][1]
    • 1542, Edward Hall, The Union of the Noble and Illustre Famelies of Lancastre and York:
      The kynge of Scottes planted his siege before the castell of Norham, and sore abated the walls.
Synonyms[edit]
Antonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Noun[edit]

abate (plural abates) (obsolete)

  1. Abatement. [from around 1400 until the late 1600s][1]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Anglo-Norman abatre, an alteration of enbatre, from Old French en + batre (to beat).[2]

Verb[edit]

abate (third-person singular simple present abates, present participle abating, simple past and past participle abated)

  1. (intransitive, law) To enter a tenement without permission after the owner has died and before the heir takes possession. [First attested around 1350 to 1470.][1]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Italian abate, from Latin abbās, abbātis, from Ancient Greek ἀββᾶς (abbâs), from Aramaic אבא (’abbā, father).

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

abate (plural abates)

  1. An Italian abbot, or other member of the clergy. [First attested in the early 18th century.][1]

References[edit]

  1. 1.00 1.01 1.02 1.03 1.04 1.05 1.06 1.07 1.08 1.09 1.10 1.11 1.12 1.13 1.14 1.15 “abate” in Lesley Brown, editor-in-chief; William R. Trumble and Angus Stevenson, editors, The Shorter Oxford English Dictionary on Historical Principles, 5th edition, Oxford; New York, N.Y.: Oxford University Press, 2002, ISBN 978-0-19-860457-0, page 2.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 Elliott K. Dobbie, C. William Dunmore, Robert K. Barnhart, et al. (editors), Chambers Dictionary of Etymology (Chambers Harrap Publishers Ltd, 2004 [1998], ISBN 0550142304), page 2

Anagrams[edit]


Italian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin abbātem, accusative form of abbās, from Ancient Greek ἀββᾶς (abbâs), from Aramaic אבא (’abbā, father).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /aˈba.te/, [äˈbäːt̪e̞]
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: a‧bà‧te

Noun[edit]

abate m (plural abati, feminine badessa)

  1. abbot
    • 1472, Dante Alighieri, La divina commedia: Purgatorio, Bompiani (2001), Canto XVIII, p. 272 vv. 118-120:
      «Io fui abate in San Zeno a Verona ¶ sotto lo 'mperio del buon Barbarossa, ¶ di cui dolente ancor Milan ragiona.»
      «I was San Zeno's abbot at Verona ¶ under the empire of good Barbarossa ¶ of whom still sorrowing Milan holds discourse.»

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • abate in Dizionario Italiano Olivetti

Anagrams[edit]


Latvian[edit]

Wikipedia-logo.png
 abate on Latvian Wikipedia
Abate

Etymology[edit]

From abats (abbott) +‎ -e (fem.).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

abate f (5th declension, masculine form: abats)

  1. abbess (the female superior of a Catholic abbey or nunnery)
    abate ir katoļu sieviešu klostera priekšniecean abbess is the leader of a Catholic nunnery (lit. women's monastery)
    abates ievēlēšana notiek bīskapa vai viņa pilnvarotā pārstāvja klātbūtnēthe selection of an abbess occurs in the presence of a bishop or of his authorized representative

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • abate in some Latvian dictionary at tezaurs.lv

Lithuanian[edit]

Pronunciation 1[edit]

Noun[edit]

abatè m f

  1. locative singular form of abatas.
  2. instrumental singular form of abatė.

Pronunciation 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

abãte m f

  1. vocative singular form of abatas.
  2. vocative singular form of abatė.

Middle English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Norman abatre.

Verb[edit]

abate

  1. to beat down, bring down, calm down

Novial[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Italian abate, from Latin abbās, abbātis, from Ancient Greek ἀββᾶς (abbâs), from Aramaic אבא (’abbā, father).

Noun[edit]

abate c (plural abates)

  1. abbot or abbess

Related terms[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Verb[edit]

abate

  1. third-person singular present indicative of abater
  2. second-person singular imperative of abater

Romanian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Vulgar Latin *abbatere, present active infinitive of *abbatō, *abbatuō, from Latin battuō.

Verb[edit]

a abate (third-person singular present abate, past participle abătut3rd conj.

  1. to stray (often figuratively in a moral sense), derogate, deviate, divert from, digress
  2. to change paths, swerve from, wander from
  3. (reflexive) to stop (going a certain way)
  4. to dissuade
  5. to knock down
Conjugation[edit]
Synonyms[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from Italian abate, from Latin abbās, abbātis, from Ancient Greek ἀββᾶς (abbâs), from Aramaic אבא (’abbā, father).

Noun[edit]

abate m (plural abați)

  1. abbot

Spanish[edit]

Verb[edit]

abate

  1. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present indicative form of abatir.
  2. Informal second-person singular () affirmative imperative form of abatir.