abate

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See also: Abate, abaté, abâte, abatē, and abatė

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English abaten, from Old French abatre (to beat down) (possibly via Middle French), from Late Latin abbatto, from ab- (away) + batto, from Latin battuere (to beat). Cognate to modern French abattre.

Verb[edit]

abate (third-person singular simple present abates, present participle abating, simple past and past participle abated)

  1. (transitive, obsolete outside law) To put an end to; to cause to cease. [attested since about 1150 to 1350][1]
    to abate a nuisance
  2. (intransitive) To become null and void. [attested since the late 15th century][1]
    The writ has abated.
  3. (transitive, law) To nullify; make void. [attested since the late 15th century][1]
    to abate a writ
  4. (transitive, obsolete) To humble; to lower in status; to bring someone down physically or mentally. [attested from around 1150 to 1350 until the mid 1600s][1]
  5. (intransitive, obsolete) To be humbled; to be brought down physically or mentally. [attested from around 1150 to 1350 until the mid 1600s][1]
  6. (transitive, obsolete) To curtail; to deprive. [attested from around 1350 to 1470 until the mid 1800s][1]
    Order restrictions and prohibitions to abate an emergency situation.
  7. (transitive) To reduce in amount, size, or value. [attested since 1325][2][1]
    Legacies are liable to be abated entirely or in proportion, upon a deficiency of assets.
  8. (intransitive) To decrease in size, value, or amount. [attested since 1325][2]
  9. (transitive) To moderate; to lessen in force, intensity, to subside. [attested since around 1150 to 1350][1]
  10. (intransitive) To decrease in intensity or force; to subside. [attested since around 1150 to 1350][1]
  11. (transitive) To deduct or omit. [attested since around 1350 to 1470][1]
    We will abate this price from the total.
    • 1845, Thomas Fuller, The Church History of Britain[1], volume 3, page 100:
      Allowing nine thousand parishes (abating the odd hundreds) in England and Wales []
  12. (transitive) To bar or except. [attested since the late 1500s][1]
  13. (transitive) To cut away or hammer down, in such a way as to leave a figure in relief, as a sculpture, or in metalwork.
  14. (transitive, obsolete) To dull the edge or point of; to blunt. [attested from the mid 1500s till the late 1600s][1]
  15. (transitive, archaic) To destroy, or level to the ground. [attested since around 1350 to 1470][1]
    • 1542, Edward Hall, The Union of the Noble and Illustre Famelies of Lancastre and York:
      The kynge of Scottes planted his siege before the castell of Norham, and sore abated the walls.
Synonyms[edit]
Antonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Noun[edit]

abate (plural abates)

  1. (obsolete) Abatement. [from around 1400 until the late 1600s][1]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Anglo-Norman abatre, an alteration of enbatre, from Old French en + batre (to beat).[2]

Verb[edit]

abate (third-person singular simple present abates, present participle abating, simple past and past participle abated)

  1. (intransitive, law) to enter a tenement without permission after the owner has died and before the heir takes possession. [First attested around 1350 to 1470.][1]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Italian abate, from Latin abbās, abbātis, from Ancient Greek ἀββᾶς (abbâs), from Aramaic אבא(’abbā, father). Doublet of abbot.

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

abate (plural abates)

  1. an Italian abbot, or other member of the clergy. [First attested in the early 18th century.][1]

References[edit]

Wikisource
See also the 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica's article on:
  1. 1.00 1.01 1.02 1.03 1.04 1.05 1.06 1.07 1.08 1.09 1.10 1.11 1.12 1.13 1.14 1.15 Lesley Brown, editor-in-chief; William R. Trumble and Angus Stevenson, editors (2002) , “abate”, in The Shorter Oxford English Dictionary on Historical Principles, 5th edition, Oxford; New York, N.Y.: Oxford University Press, →ISBN, page 2
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 Elliott K. Dobbie, C. William Dunmore, Robert K. Barnhart, et al. (editors), Chambers Dictionary of Etymology (Chambers Harrap Publishers Ltd, 2004 [1998], →ISBN), page 2

Anagrams[edit]


Italian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Late Latin abbātem, accusative form of abbās, from Ancient Greek ἀββᾶς (abbâs), from Aramaic אבא(’abbā, father).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /aˈba.te/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ate
  • Hyphenation: a‧bà‧te

Noun[edit]

abate m (plural abati, feminine badessa)

  1. abbot
    • 1321, Dante Alighieri, La divina commedia: Purgatorio [The Divine Comedy: Purgatory] (paperback), Bompiani, published 2001, Canto XVIII, lines 118–120, page 272:
      «Io fui abate in San Zeno a Verona ¶ sotto lo 'mperio del buon Barbarossa, ¶ di cui dolente ancor Milan ragiona.»
      «I was San Zeno's abbot at Verona under the empire of good Barbarossa of whom still sorrowing Milan holds discourse.»

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Albanian: abat
  • Belarusian: абат (abat)
  • Bulgarian: абат (abat)
  • English: abate
  • Romanian: abate
  • Russian: аббат (abbat)
  • Ukrainian: абат (abat)

Anagrams[edit]

References[edit]

  • abate in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana
  • abate in Dizionario Italiano Olivetti

Latvian[edit]

Wikipedia-logo.png
 abate on Latvian Wikipedia
Abate

Etymology[edit]

From abats (abbott) +‎ -e (fem.).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

abate f (5th declension, masculine form: abats)

  1. abbess (the female superior of a Catholic abbey or nunnery)
    abate ir katoļu sieviešu klostera priekšniecean abbess is the leader of a Catholic nunnery (lit. women's monastery)
    abates ievēlēšana notiek bīskapa vai viņa pilnvarotā pārstāvja klātbūtnēthe selection of an abbess occurs in the presence of a bishop or of his authorized representative

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Lithuanian[edit]

Pronunciation 1[edit]

Noun[edit]

abatè

  1. locative singular of abatas
  2. instrumental singular of abatė

Pronunciation 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

abãte

  1. vocative singular of abatas
  2. vocative singular of abatė

Middle English[edit]

Verb[edit]

abate

  1. Alternative form of abaten

Portuguese[edit]

Verb[edit]

abate

  1. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present indicative of abater
  2. second-person singular (tu, sometimes used with você) affirmative imperative of abater

Romanian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Vulgar Latin *abbatere, present active infinitive of *abbatō, *abbatuō, from Latin battuō.

Verb[edit]

a abate (third-person singular present abate, past participle abătut3rd conj.

  1. to stray (often figuratively in a moral sense), derogate, deviate, divert from, digress
    Synonyms: devia, îndepărta
  2. to change paths, swerve from, wander from
  3. (reflexive) to stop (going a certain way)
    Synonym: opri
  4. to dissuade
  5. to knock down
    Synonyms: dărâma, da jos
Conjugation[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from Italian abate, from Latin abbās, abbātis, from Ancient Greek ἀββᾶς (abbâs), from Aramaic אבא(’abbā, father).

Noun[edit]

abate m (plural abați)

  1. abbot

Spanish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /aˈbate/, [aˈβ̞a.t̪e]

Verb[edit]

abate

  1. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present indicative form of abatir.
  2. Informal second-person singular () affirmative imperative form of abatir.