absorber

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See also: Absorber

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

absorb +‎ -er

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (US) IPA(key): /əbˈsɔɹ.bɚ/, /əbˈzɔɹ.bɚ/, /æbˈsɔɹ.bɚ/, /æbˈzɔɹ.bɚ/

Noun[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

absorber (plural absorbers)

  1. Something that absorbs.
    • 1698, Richard Boulton, A Treatise Concerning the Heat of the Blood and Also of the Use of the Lungs, London: A. & J. Churchill, p. 121,[1]
      [] these Symptoms are only curred, by such Medicines as correct the Acidity and Acrimony of the Blood, viz. When it most partakes of Acrimony by sweet diaphoretick Decoctions, or some sort of Acids, which dull and take off their corroding Edges, or when they are more Acid, by volatile Salts that carry them off by Sweat or Urine; or by Acid Absorbers, which by correcting the Acidities of the Pancreatick Juice, leave the Ferment of the Liver more predominant []
    • 1756, Thomas Amory, The Life of John Buncle, Esq., London: J. Noon, Chapter 36 “Remarks on the delluge,” p. ,[2]
      The swallows especially must do great work in the case, if we take into their number not only very many open gulphs or chasms, the depth of which no line or sound can reach; but likewise the communications of very many parts of the sea, and of many great unfathomable lochs, with the abyss. These absorbers could easily receive what had before come out of them.
    • c. 1869, Joel Dorman Steele, Answers to the Practical Questions and Problems contained in the Fourteen Weeks Courses in Physiology, Philosophy, Astronomy, and Chemistry, New York: A.S. Barnes, p. 45,[3]
      Which can be ignited the more easily with a burning-glass, black or white paper?
      Black paper, since it is a much better absorber of heat.
    1. A device which causes gas or vapor to be absorbed by a liquid. [First attested in the mid 19th century.][1]
    2. (nuclear physics) A material that absorbs neutrons in a reactor.
  2. A person who absorbs. [First attested in the mid 19th century.][1]
    • 1885, George Meredith, Diana of the Crossways, London: Chapman & Hall, Volume II, Chapter 12, pp. 272-273,[4]
      Old Lady Dacier’s bluntness in speaking of her grandson would have shocked Lady Wathin as much as it astonished, had she been less of an ardent absorber of aristocratic manners.
    • 1958, Irving Stone, The Agony and the Ecstasy, Garden City, NY: Doubleday, Book One, Chapter 5, p. 23,[5]
      [] since few wanted mosaics any more he had turned to fresco, becoming the greatest absorber and eclectic in Italy. He had learned everything that the earlier fresco painters, from the time of Cimabue, had to teach.
    • 1999, David Foster Wallace, “The Depressed Person” in Brief Interviews with Hideous Men, New York: Back Bay Books, p. 47,[6]
      [] Walter D. (“Walt”) DeLasandro Jr. had been able to bill her parents $130 an hour plus expenses for being put in the middle and playing the role of mediator and absorber of shit from both sides while she (i.e., the depressed person, as a child) had had to perform essentially the same coprophagous services on a more or less daily basis for free []

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  1. 1.0 1.1 Lesley Brown (editor), The Shorter Oxford English Dictionary, 5th edition (Oxford University Press, 2003 [1933], →ISBN), page 9

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin absorbēre, present active infinitive of absorbeō (absorb).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

absorber

  1. to absorb

Conjugation[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Verb[edit]

absorber

  1. imperative of absorbere

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin absorbēre, present active infinitive of absorbeō (absorb).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /absorˈbeɾ/, [aβsorˈβeɾ]

Verb[edit]

absorber (first-person singular present absorbo, first-person singular preterite absorbí, past participle absorbido)

  1. to absorb
  2. to use up

Conjugation[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]