acute

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See also: acuté

English[edit]

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Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from Latin acūtus (sharp), perfect passive participle of acuō (sharpen, make sharp). Cognate to ague (acute, intermittent fever).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

acute (comparative acuter or more acute, superlative acutest or most acute)

Acute leaf.
  1. Urgent.
    Synonyms: pressing, urgent, emergent, sudden
    His need for medical attention was acute.
  2. Sensitive.
    Synonyms: intense, powerful, strong, sharp, keen
    Antonyms: dull, witless, obtuse, slow
    She had an acute sense of honor.   Eagles have very acute vision.
  3. Short, quick, brief.
    Synonyms: fast, rapid
    Antonyms: slow, leisurely
    • 2013 July-August, Philip J. Bushnell, “Solvents, Ethanol, Car Crashes & Tolerance”, in American Scientist:
      Surprisingly, this analysis revealed that acute exposure to solvent vapors at concentrations below those associated with long-term effects appears to increase the risk of a fatal automobile accident. Furthermore, this increase in risk is comparable to the risk of death from leukemia after long-term exposure to benzene, another solvent, which has the well-known property of causing this type of cancer.
    It was an acute event.
  4. (geometry) Of an angle, less than 90 degrees.
    Antonyms: obtuse
  5. (geometry) Of a triangle, having all three interior angles measuring less than 90 degrees.
    Synonyms: acute-angled
    Antonyms: obtuse, obtuse-angled
  6. (botany) With the sides meeting directly to form an acute angle (at an apex or base)
    Synonyms: obtuse
    • The corollas of the plant species Eremophila abietina have acute lobes.
      2007, R. J. Chinnock, Eremophila and Allied Genera: A Monograph of the Plant Family Myoporaceae:
      204. Eremophila abietina ... Corolla 23–35 mm long, ... lobes acute.
  7. (medicine) Of an abnormal condition of recent or sudden onset, in contrast to delayed onset; this sense does not imply severity (unlike the common usage).
    He dropped dead of an acute illness.
  8. (medicine) Of a short-lived condition, in contrast to a chronic condition; this sense also does not imply severity.
    Antonyms: chronic
    • 2013 May-June, Katie L. Burke, “In the News”, in American Scientist, volume 101, number 3, page 193:
      Bats host many high-profile viruses that can infect humans, including severe acute respiratory syndrome and Ebola. A recent study explored the ecological variables that may contribute to bats’ propensity to harbor such zoonotic diseases by comparing them with another order of common reservoir hosts: rodents.
    The acute symptoms resolved promptly.
  9. (orthography, after a letter) Having an acute accent.
    The last letter of “café” is ‘e’ acute.
  10. High or shrill.
    an acute tone or accent

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

acute (plural acutes)

  1. (orthography) An acute accent.
    The word “cafe” often has an acute over the ‘e’.
  2. A person who has the acute form of a disorder, such as schizophrenia.

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

acute (third-person singular simple present acutes, present participle acuting, simple past and past participle acuted)

  1. (phonetics) To give an acute sound to.
    He acutes his rising inflection too much.

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Asturian[edit]

Verb[edit]

acute

  1. first-person singular present subjunctive of acutar
  2. third-person singular present subjunctive of acutar

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

acute

  1. Inflected form of acuut.

Italian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

acute f pl

  1. Feminine plural of adjective acuto.

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Participle[edit]

acūte

  1. vocative masculine singular of acūtus

References[edit]