adown

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English adowne, from Old English adūn, earlier ofdūne (down), from of dūne (off the hill) (compare Latin ad vallum > Old French à val, used in the same way).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

adown (not comparable)

  1. (archaic) Down, downward; to or in a lower place.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Qveene. [], London: [] [John Wolfe] for VVilliam Ponsonbie, OCLC 960102938, book I, canto VII, stanza 24:
      Thrice did she sink adown.
    • 1859, Ferna Vale, Natalie; or, A Gem Among the Sea-Weeds
      Many a family circle wept as they looked upon the familiar places, which would know their lost ones no more; but ah, chide me not, kind reader, in thus leading you adown to the coldness of death, in setting before you that which causes your tender heart to shudder.

Preposition[edit]

adown

  1. (archaic) Down.
    • 1875, Charlotte Riddell, The Uninhabited House
      I fell from one dream into another; found myself wandering through impossible places; [] peering out into the darkness, to catch a sight of a vague figure standing somewhere in the shadow, and looking, with the sun streaming into my eyes and blinding me, adown long white roads filled with a multitude of people []

Quotations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]