aggrieve

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English agreven, from Old French agrever; a (Latin ad) + grever (to burden, injure), from Latin gravare (to weigh down), from gravis (heavy). See grieve, and compare with aggravate.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ʌˈɡɹiv/, IPA(key): /əˈɡɹiv/
  • (file)

Verb[edit]

aggrieve (third-person singular simple present aggrieves, present participle aggrieving, simple past and past participle aggrieved)

  1. (transitive) To cause someone to feel pain or sorrow to; to afflict
    • 1848, Edgar Allan Poe, Eureka:
      Right is positive; wrong is negative—is merely the negation of right; as cold is the negation of heat—darkness of light. That a thing may be wrong, it is necessary that there be some other thing in relation to which it is wrong—some condition which it fails to satisfy; some law which it violates; some being whom it aggrieves.
  2. (intransitive, obsolete) To grieve; to lament.

Usage notes[edit]

Now commonly used in the passive, to be aggrieved.

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

References[edit]