ajar

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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English ajar, on char ‎(on [the] turn), from on ‎(on) + char ‎(turn, occasion), from Old English ċierr, cyrr ‎(turn), from Old English ċierran ‎(to turn, convert), equivalent to a- +‎ char. Akin to Dutch akerre, kier ‎(ajar), German kehren ‎(to turn). See char.

Adverb[edit]

ajar ‎(not comparable)

  1. Slightly turned or opened.
    The door was standing ajar.
Translations[edit]

Adjective[edit]

ajar ‎(comparative more ajar, superlative most ajar)

  1. Slightly turned or opened.
    The door is ajar.
    When is a door not a door? When it is ajar.
    The pantry door was ajar, so I opened it and took out the jamb.
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

ajar ‎(third-person singular simple present ajars, present participle ajarring, simple past and past participle ajarred)

  1. (rare, perhaps nonstandard) To turn or open slightly; to become ajar or to cause to become ajar; to be or to hang ajar.
    • 1970, John H. Evans, Mercer County law journal, Volume 10,
      A plainclothes detective knocked on a slightly ajarred door.
    • 1977, Bill Reed, Dogod,
      Yes, and the door also lops off stairs leading to a landing on whose landing is another door on whose hinges much of this story ajars, if it hasn't jarred too much already.
    • 2007, Loki, Shard of the Ancient,
      Just as the gates fully ajarred themselves, the Lamborghini soared through them, and out into the freedom of the poorly defined road.

Etymology 2[edit]

a- ‎(in, at) +‎ jar ‎(discord, disagreement)

Adverb[edit]

ajar ‎(not comparable)

  1. (archaic) Out of harmony.
  2. Being at variance or in contradiction to something.
    • 1819, Lord Byron, Don Juan, II.14:
      There is a sort of unexpressed concern, / A kind of shock that sets one's heart ajar [...].
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

ajar ‎(third-person singular simple present ajars, present participle ajarring, simple past and past participle ajarred)

  1. (rare, perhaps nonstandard) To show variance or contradiction with something; to be or cause to be askew.
    • 1907, The English Illustrated Magazine, Volume 36,
      It clean deafened the two of us, and set all the crockery ware ajarring ; and when the neighbours heard it they came running into the street to see who was getting hurt.
Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Indonesian[edit]

Verb[edit]

ajar (used in the form mengajar)

  1. to teach

Derived terms[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From obsolete ahajar, from Old Spanish haja.

Verb[edit]

ajar ‎(first-person singular present ajo, first-person singular preterite ajé, past participle ajado)

  1. (transitive and reflexive) to fade, wither

Conjugation[edit]