amour

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See also: Amour

English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French amour.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

amour (countable and uncountable, plural amours)

  1. (obsolete) Love, affection.
  2. Courtship; flirtation.
  3. A love affair.
    • 1749, Henry Fielding, “A Dialogue between Mr. Jones and the Barber”, in The History of Tom Jones, a Foundling, volume III, London: A[ndrew] Millar [], OCLC 928184292, book VIII, page 180:
      Jones had mentioned the Fact of his Amour, and of his being the Rival of Blifil, but had cautiously concealed the Name of the young Lady.
    • 1990 October 26, Jerry Sullivan, “Field & Street”, in Chicago Reader[1]:
      The amours of the greater scaup are, if anything, even more varied.
  4. A lover.
    • 1845 April, Ned Buntline, “A Night-Adventure in Cuba”, in The Knickerbocker, or New-York Monthly Magazine, volume XXV, number 4, New York, N.Y.: [] John Allen, [], page 326:
      Dulce, will you go to the masquerade-ball to night?’ said I to my lesser-half, on a bright evening during the gayest part of the ‘carnival season.’ / ‘No, my amor,’ answered she; ‘I am ill this evening; do n’t go out to-night, but stay by my side, and let your cheering presence save a doctor’s fee.’
    • 2000 December 29, James McManus, “The Winter Casino”, in Chicago Reader[2]:
      Makes you wonder how they were able to see their amours, or their hands...

Related terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

French Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia fr

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French amour, from Old French amor, from Latin amor. The regular phonetic development would be ameur, attested in Old French; there has probably been an influence from Old Occitan.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /a.muʁ/
  • (file)
    ,
    (file)
  • Rhymes: -uʁ
  • Homophone: amours

Noun[edit]

amour m or f (plural amours)

  1. love
    • 1931, “J’ai deux amours”, performed by Josephine Baker:
      J’ai deux amours / Mon pays et Paris
      I have two loves / My country and Paris
    • 2008, Cécile Corbel (lyrics and music), “Where have you been”, in Songbook vol. 3 - renaissance[3] (CD), Brittany: Keltia Musique:
      Ô mon Amour/ Mes pensées sont en voyage / Elles s’enroulent comme un ruban / O my love I’ve been searching / But I don’t know how / To find my way in the world without you
      O my Love / My thoughts are wandering / They wind like a ribbon / O my love I’ve been searching / But I don’t know how / To find my way in the world without you

Usage notes[edit]

  • Though masculine when singular, the word amour is feminine when plural in the literary language; the same applies to délice and orgue.

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Middle French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French amor, from Latin amor.

Noun[edit]

amour m (plural amours)

  1. love

Descendants[edit]

  • French: amour

Norman[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French amor, from Latin amor.

Noun[edit]

amour m (plural amours)

  1. (Jersey) love