anger

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English[edit]

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Etymology[edit]

From Middle English anger ‎(grief, pain, trouble, affliction, vexation, sorrow, wrath), from Old Norse angr, ǫngr ‎(affliction, sorrow), from ang, ǫng ‎(troubled), from Proto-Germanic *anguz ‎(narrow, strait), from Proto-Indo-European *amǵʰ- ‎(narrow, tied together). Cognate with Danish anger ‎(regret, remorse), Swedish ånger ‎(regret), Icelandic angur ‎(trouble), Old English ange, enge ‎(narrow, close, straitened, constrained, confined, vexed, troubled, sorrowful, anxious, oppressive, severe, painful, cruel), German Angst ‎(anxiety, anguish, fear), Latin angō ‎(squeeze, choke, vex), Albanian ang ‎(fear, anxiety, pain, nightmare), Avestan angra ‎(angra, destructive), Ancient Greek ἄγχω ‎(ánkhō, I squeeze, strangle), Sanskrit अंहु ‎(aṃhu, anxiety, distress). Also compare anguish, anxious, quinsy, and perhaps to awe and ugly. The word seems to have originally meant “to choke, squeeze”.[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

anger ‎(countable and uncountable, plural angers)

  1. A strong feeling of displeasure, hostility or antagonism towards someone or something, usually combined with an urge to harm.
    • 2013 June 28, Joris Luyendijk, “Our banks are out of control”, The Guardian Weekly, volume 189, number 3, page 21: 
      Seeing the British establishment struggle with the financial sector is like watching an alcoholic […].  Until 2008 there was denial over what finance had become. When a series of bank failures made this impossible, there was widespread anger, leading to the public humiliation of symbolic figures.
    You need to control your anger.
  2. (obsolete) Pain or stinging.
    • 1660, Simon Patrick, Mensa mystica, published 1717, page 322:
      It heals the Wounds that Sin hath made; and takes away the Anger of the Sore; []
    • Temple
      I made the experiment, setting the moxa where [] the greatest anger and soreness still continued.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

anger ‎(third-person singular simple present angers, present participle angering, simple past and past participle angered)

  1. (transitive) To cause such a feeling of antagonism.
    Don't anger me.
  2. (intransitive) To become angry.
    You anger too easily.

Synonyms[edit]

Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  • anger in The Century Dictionary, The Century Co., New York, 1911
  • Notes:
  1. ^ anger in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913

Anagrams[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse angr.

Noun[edit]

anger m ‎(definite singular angeren) (uncountable)

  1. regret, remorse, contrition, repentance, penitence

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse angr.

Noun[edit]

anger m ‎(definite singular angeren) (uncountable)

  1. regret, remorse, contrition, repentance, penitence

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Verb[edit]

anger

  1. present tense of ange.