anima

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See also: ánima, animá, ànima, animà, animâ, and ânima

English[edit]

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Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from Latin anima(a current of air, wind, air, breath, the vital principle, life, soul), sometimes equivalent to animus(mind), both from Proto-Indo-European *ane-(to breathe, blow); see animus. Cognate with Ancient Greek άνεμος(ánemos, wind), Old English anda(anger, envy, zeal). More at onde.

Noun[edit]

anima ‎(plural animas)

  1. (chiefly philosophy) The soul or inner self of a person, especially the irrational part of a person as contrasted with the rational animus. [from 10th c.]
  2. (Jungian psychology) The inner self (not the external persona) of a person that is in touch with the unconscious as opposed to the persona. [from 20th c.]
    • 1990, Camille Paglia, Sexual Personae:
      Dorothy is bodiless and sexless in Tintern Abbey because she is Wordsworth's Jungian anima, an internal aspect of self momentarily projected.
  3. (Jungian psychology) The unconscious feminine aspect of a person. [from 20th c.]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

External links[edit]

  • anima in The Century Dictionary, The Century Co., New York, 1911

Anagrams[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Verb[edit]

anima

  1. third-person singular present indicative form of animar
  2. second-person singular imperative form of animar

Esperanto[edit]

Etymology[edit]

animo +‎ -a

Adjective[edit]

anima ‎(accusative singular animan, plural animaj, accusative plural animajn)

  1. of the soul

French[edit]

Verb[edit]

anima

  1. third-person singular past historic of animer

Anagrams[edit]


Interlingua[edit]

Interlingua Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia ia

Noun[edit]

anima ‎(plural animas)

  1. soul

Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin anima. Doublet of alma.

Noun[edit]

anima f ‎(plural anime)

  1. soul

Verb[edit]

anima

  1. third-person singular indicative present of animare
  2. second-person singular imperative of animare

Related terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

See animus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

anima f ‎(genitive animae); first declension

  1. soul, spirit, life
    Magnificat anima mea dominum.
    My soul glorifies the Lord.
  2. air, breeze
  3. breath
  4. vocative singular of anima

animā f

  1. ablative singular of anima

Inflection[edit]

First declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative anima animae
genitive animae animārum
dative animae animīs
accusative animam animās
ablative animā animīs
vocative anima animae

Related terms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Verb[edit]

animā

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of animō

References[edit]

  • anima in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • anima in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • ANIMA in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • Félix Gaffiot (1934), Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Paris: Hachette, s.v.anima”.
  • Meissner, Carl; Auden, Henry William (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to breathe, live: animam, spiritum ducere
    • to hold one's breath: animam continere
    • to give up the ghost: animam edere or efflare
    • to be at one's last gasp: animam agere
    • (ambiguous) to weary, bore the reader: languorem, molestiam legentium animis afferre
    • (ambiguous) to banish devout sentiment from the minds of others: religionem ex animis extrahere (N. D. 1. 43. 121)
    • (ambiguous) Nature has implanted in all men the idea of a God: natura in omnium animis notionem dei impressit (N. D. 1. 16. 43)

Old French[edit]

Noun[edit]

anima f ‎(oblique plural animas, nominative singular anima, nominative plural animas)

  1. (9th and 10th centuries) Alternative form of ame

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowing from Latin anima. Doublet of alma, inherited from the same source.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

anima f (plural animas)

  1. (Jungian psychology) anima (unconscious feminine aspect of a male)
  2. anima (soul or inner self of a person)
Synonyms[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • Hyphenation: a‧ni‧ma
  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /ɐ.ˈni.mɐ/, /a.ˈni.mɐ/

Verb[edit]

anima

  1. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present indicative of animar
  2. second-person singular (tu, sometimes used with você) affirmative imperative of animar

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from French animer.

Verb[edit]

a anima ‎(third-person singular present animă, past participle animat1st conj.

  1. anima

Conjugation[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Verb[edit]

anima

  1. Informal second-person singular () affirmative imperative form of animar.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present indicative form of animar.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present indicative form of animar.