anima

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
See also: ánima, animá, ànima, animà, animâ, and ânima

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin anima (a current of air, wind, air, breath, the vital principle, life, soul), sometimes equivalent to animus (mind), both from Proto-Indo-European *h₂enh₁- (to breathe, blow); see animus. Cognate with Ancient Greek άνεμος (ánemos, wind), Old English anda (anger, envy, zeal). More at onde.

Noun[edit]

anima (plural animas)

  1. (chiefly philosophy) The soul or animating principle of a living thing, especially as contrasted with the animus. [from 10th c.]
    • 1665, Robert Hooke, Micrographia, XXXVIII:
      [W]e cannot chuse but admire the exceeding vividness of the governing faculty or Anima of the Insect, which is able to dispose and regulate so the motive faculties, as to cause every peculiar organ, not onely to move or act so quick, but to do it also so regularly.
  2. (Jungian psychology) The inner self (not the external persona) of a person that is in touch with the unconscious as opposed to the persona. [from 20th c.]
    • 1990, Camille Paglia, Sexual Personae:
      Dorothy is bodiless and sexless in Tintern Abbey because she is Wordsworth's Jungian anima, an internal aspect of self momentarily projected.
  3. (Jungian psychology) The unconscious feminine aspect of a person. [from 20th c.]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • anima in The Century Dictionary, The Century Co., New York, 1911

Anagrams[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Verb[edit]

anima

  1. third-person singular present indicative form of animar
  2. second-person singular imperative form of animar

Esperanto[edit]

Etymology[edit]

animo +‎ -a

Adjective[edit]

anima (accusative singular animan, plural animaj, accusative plural animajn)

  1. of the soul; spiritual
    • Simono Pejno (translator), “Revon havas mi” (“I Have a Dream”), speech given by Martin Luther King, Jr. in Washington, DC on August 28, 1963,
      Foje kaj refoje ni leviĝu supren al majestaj altejoj, alfrontante fizikan forton kun anima forto.
      Again and again, we must rise to the majestic heights of meeting physical force with soul force.
  2. of the mind, mental, psychological, inner
    Ĝi staras antaŭ miaj animaj okuloj.
    I can see it with my mind’s eye.
    anima lukto / ekvilibro
    inner struggle / balance
    • Heinrich August Luyken, Stranga heredaĵo, Ĉapitro 12,
      Vi bezonas korpan kaj animan ripozon.
      You need physical and mental rest.

French[edit]

Verb[edit]

anima

  1. third-person singular past historic of animer

Anagrams[edit]


Interlingua[edit]

Interlingua Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia ia

Noun[edit]

anima (plural animas)

  1. soul

Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin anima, from animus, from Proto-Italic *anamos, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂enh₁mos, a nominal derivative of *h₂enh₁- (breathe). Doublet of alma.

Pronunciation[edit]

Italian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia it
  • IPA(key): /ˈa.ni.ma/, [ˈäːnimä]
  • Rhymes: -anima
  • Hyphenation: à‧ni‧ma

Noun[edit]

anima f (plural anime)

  1. (religion, philosophy, also figuratively) soul
  2. (lutherie) sound post

Verb[edit]

anima

  1. third-person singular indicative present of animare
  2. second-person singular imperative of animare

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

See animus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

anima f (genitive animae); first declension

  1. soul, spirit, life
    Magnificat anima mea dominum.
    My soul glorifies the Lord.
  2. air, breeze
  3. breath
  4. vocative singular of anima

animā f

  1. ablative singular of anima

Inflection[edit]

First declension.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative anima animae
Genitive animae animārum
Dative animae animīs
Accusative animam animās
Ablative animā animīs
Vocative anima animae

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Verb[edit]

animā

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of animō

References[edit]

  • anima in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • anima in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • anima in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • anima in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to breathe, live: animam, spiritum ducere
    • to hold one's breath: animam continere
    • to give up the ghost: animam edere or efflare
    • to be at one's last gasp: animam agere
    • (ambiguous) to weary, bore the reader: languorem, molestiam legentium animis afferre
    • (ambiguous) to banish devout sentiment from the minds of others: religionem ex animis extrahere (N. D. 1. 43. 121)
    • (ambiguous) Nature has implanted in all men the idea of a God: natura in omnium animis notionem dei impressit (N. D. 1. 16. 43)

Old French[edit]

Noun[edit]

anima f (oblique plural animas, nominative singular anima, nominative plural animas)

  1. (9th and 10th centuries) Alternative form of ame

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from Latin anima. Doublet of alma, inherited from the same source.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

anima f (plural animas)

  1. (Jungian psychology) anima (unconscious feminine aspect of a male)
  2. anima (soul or inner self of a person)
Synonyms[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • Hyphenation: a‧ni‧ma
  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /ɐ.ˈni.mɐ/, /a.ˈni.mɐ/

Verb[edit]

anima

  1. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present indicative of animar
  2. second-person singular (tu, sometimes used with você) affirmative imperative of animar

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French animer.

Verb[edit]

a anima (third-person singular present animă, past participle animat1st conj.

  1. anima

Conjugation[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Verb[edit]

anima

  1. Informal second-person singular () affirmative imperative form of animar.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present indicative form of animar.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present indicative form of animar.