anus

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See also: Anus, anüs, ânus, and -anus

English[edit]

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Etymology[edit]

First attested in 1658, from Old French anus, from Latin ānus ‎(ring, anus), from Proto-Indo-European *ano- ‎(ring). See also anal, annular, annelid.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

anus ‎(plural anuses)

  1. (anatomy) The lower orifice of the alimentary canal, through which feces and flatus are ejected.

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Albanian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

anus m

  1. (anatomy) anus

Catalan[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Latin ānus

Noun[edit]

anus m ‎(plural anus)

  1. (anatomy) anus

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

anus m ‎(plural anussen or ani, diminutive anusje n)

  1. (anatomy) anus

Finnish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin.

Noun[edit]

anus

  1. anus

Declension[edit]

Inflection of anus (Kotus type 39/vastaus, no gradation)
nominative anus anukset
genitive anuksen anusten
anuksien
partitive anusta anuksia
illative anukseen anuksiin
singular plural
nominative anus anukset
accusative nom.? anus anukset
gen. anuksen
genitive anuksen anusten
anuksien
partitive anusta anuksia
inessive anuksessa anuksissa
elative anuksesta anuksista
illative anukseen anuksiin
adessive anuksella anuksilla
ablative anukselta anuksilta
allative anukselle anuksille
essive anuksena anuksina
translative anukseksi anuksiksi
instructive anuksin
abessive anuksetta anuksitta
comitative anuksineen

Synonyms[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from Latin ānus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

anus m ‎(plural anus)

  1. (anatomy) anus

Synonyms[edit]

External links[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Indo-European *h₁eh₂no- ‎(ring). Possibly cognate with Old Armenian անուր ‎(anur).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ānus m ‎(genitive ānī); second declension

  1. a ring
  2. an anus
Inflection[edit]

Second declension.

Number Singular Plural
nominative ānus ānī
genitive ānī ānōrum
dative ānō ānīs
accusative ānum ānōs
ablative ānō ānīs
vocative āne ānī
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Proto-Indo-European *h₂enHo- ‎(old woman). Cognates include Ancient Greek ἀννίς ‎(annís) ("maternal grandparent"), Old Armenian հան ‎(han, grandmother), Old High German ana ("grandmother") and ano ("grandfather"), Old Prussian ane ("grandmother").

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

anus f ‎(genitive anūs); fourth declension

  1. old woman, crone
    • 11th to 13th century, In taberna quando sumus, from Carmina Burana:
      … bibit soror, bibit frater, / bibit anus, bibit mater, …
      (… the sister drinks, the brother drinks, / the old lady drinks, the mother drinks, …)
Inflection[edit]

Fourth declension.

Number Singular Plural
nominative anus anūs
genitive anūs anuum
dative anuī anibus
accusative anum anūs
ablative anū anibus
vocative anus anūs
Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • Michiel de Vaan (2008), Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages, Leiden, Boston: Brill Academic Publishers
  • (anus):anus” in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short, A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1879.
  • (ring):anus” in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short, A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1879.
  • (crone):anus” in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short, A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1879.

Old Irish[edit]

Verb[edit]

·anus

  1. first-person singular future / present subjunctive conjunct of aingid

Mutation[edit]

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
·anus unchanged ·n-anus
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin ānus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

anus n (plural anusuri)

  1. (anatomy) anus

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin ānus.

Noun[edit]

anus n

  1. (anatomy) anus

Declension[edit]