aqua

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See also: aqua-

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin aqua, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ekʷeh₂, whence also Old English ēa, ǽ ‎(river). More at ea.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

aqua ‎(countable and uncountable, plural aquas or aquae)

  1. (inorganic chemistry) The compound water.
  2. A shade of colour, usually a mix of green and blue similar to the colour turquoise.
    aqua colour:    
    • 2009 June 27, Patricia Cohen, “Employing Art Along With Ambassadors”, in New York Times[1]:
      Ms. Rockburne, with help from a team of artists, is working on a gargantuan mural of deep blues, shimmering aquas and luminous gold leaf that is headed for the American Embassy in Kingston, Jamaica.

Adjective[edit]

aqua ‎(comparative more aqua, superlative most aqua)

  1. Of a greenish-blue colour.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]


Ido[edit]

Adjective[edit]

aqua

  1. aqueous

Interlingua[edit]

Noun[edit]

aqua ‎(plural aquas)

  1. water

Interlingue[edit]

Noun[edit]

aqua

  1. water

Istriot[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin aqua.

Noun[edit]

aqua f (plural aque)

  1. water

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Italic *akʷā, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ekʷeh₂. Cognate with Old English ēa ‎(flowing water, stream, river). More at ea.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

aqua f ‎(genitive aquae); first declension

  1. water
    • 405 CE, Jerome, Vulgate Genesis.1.2
      terra autem erat inanis et vacua et tenebrae super faciem abyssi et spiritus Dei ferebatur super aquas
      And the earth was void and empty, and darkness was upon the face of the deep; and the spirit of God moved over the waters.

Inflection[edit]

First declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative aqua aquae
genitive aquae aquārum
dative aquae aquīs
accusative aquam aquās
ablative aquā aquīs
vocative aqua aquae

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

External links[edit]

  • aqua” in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short, A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1879.

References[edit]

  • aqua” in Félix Gaffiot (1934), Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Paris: Hachette.
  • Meissner, Carl; Auden, Henry William (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[2], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • the surface of the water: summa aqua
    • to stand out of the water: ex aqua exstare
    • the water reaches to the waist: aqua est umbilīco tenus
    • the water is up to, is above, the chest: aqua pectus aequat, superat
    • to come to the surface: (se) ex aqua emergere
    • to draw off water from a river: aquam ex flumine derivare
    • to bring a stream of water through the garden: aquam ducere per hortum
    • a conduit; an aqueduct: aquae ductus (plur. aquarum ductus)
    • running water: aqua viva, profluens (opp. stagnum)
    • a perpetual spring: aqua iugis, perennis
    • ill-watered: aquae, aquarum inops
    • to slake one's thirst by a draught of cold water: sitim haustu gelidae aquae sedare
    • to proscribe a person, declare him an outlaw: aqua et igni interdicere alicui