argumentum

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From the Latin argūmentum.

Pronunciation[edit]

or as in Latin

Noun[edit]

argumentum (plural argumenta)

  1. (chiefly formal, in law, logic, etc.) Used in numerous Latin phrases (and occasionally alone) in the sense of “appeal” or “argument”.
    • 1682: Sir Edward Coke, Argumentum anti-Normannicum, main title (John Darby)
      Argumentum anti-Normannicum: or, An argument proving, from ancient histories and records, that William, Duke of Normandy, made no absolute conquest of England by the sword; in the sense of our modern writers.

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From arguō (prove, argue).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

argūmentum n (genitive argūmentī); second declension

  1. argument (as in an argument for a position); evidence, a proof
  2. a point, a theme
  3. a topic, thesis

Inflection[edit]

Second declension neuter.

Number Singular Plural
nominative argūmentum argūmenta
genitive argūmentī argūmentōrum
dative argūmentō argūmentīs
accusative argūmentum argūmenta
ablative argūmentō argūmentīs
vocative argūmentum argūmenta

Descendants[edit]