argumentum

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From the Latin argūmentum.

Pronunciation[edit]

or as in Latin

Noun[edit]

argumentum ‎(plural argumenta)

  1. (chiefly formal, in law, logic, etc.) Used in numerous Latin phrases (and occasionally alone) in the sense of “appeal” or “argument”.
    • 1682: Sir Edward Coke, Argumentum anti-Normannicum, main title (John Darby)
      Argumentum anti-Normannicum: or, An argument proving, from ancient histories and records, that William, Duke of Normandy, made no absolute conquest of England by the sword; in the sense of our modern writers.

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

arguō ‎(I prove or demonstrate”, “I assert or allege) +‎ -mentum ‎(instrument”, “medium”, “result of)

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

argūmentum n ‎(genitive argūmentī); second declension

  1. argument (as in an argument for a position); evidence, a proof
  2. a point, a theme
  3. a topic, thesis
  4. a plot, especially in theater.

Declension[edit]

Second declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative argūmentum argūmenta
genitive argūmentī argūmentōrum
dative argūmentō argūmentīs
accusative argūmentum argūmenta
ablative argūmentō argūmentīs
vocative argūmentum argūmenta

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • argūmentum” in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short, A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1879.
  • argūmentum” on page 160 of Félix Gaffiot (1934), Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Paris: Hachette.
  • Meissner, Carl; Auden, Henry William (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • a strong, striking proof: argumentum firmum, magnum
    • to bring forward a proof: argumentum afferre
    • to quote an argument in favour of immortality: argumentum immortalitatis afferre (not pro)
    • to bring forward a proof of the immortality of the soul: argumentum afferre, quo animos immortales esse demonstratur
    • a proof of this is that..: argumento huic rei est, quod
    • to prove a thing indisputably: argumentis confirmare, comprobare, evincere aliquid (or c. Acc. c. Inf.)
    • to derive an argument from a thing: argumentum ducere, sumere ex aliqua re or petere ab aliqua re
    • to persist in an argument, press a point: argumentum premere (not urgere)
    • the points on which proofs are based; the grounds of proof: loci (τόποι) argumentorum (De Or. 2. 162)
    • to refute arguments: argumenta refellere, confutare
    • the plot of the piece: argumentum
    • I have nothing to write about: non habeo argumentum scribendi
    • I have nothing to write about: deest mihi argumentum ad scribendum (Att. 9. 7. 7)
  • argumentum” in Ramminger, Johann (accessed 16 July 2016) Neulateinische Wortliste: Ein Wörterbuch des Lateinischen von Petrarca bis 1700[2], pre-publication website, 2005-2016
  • argūmentum” on page 168/1 of the Oxford Latin Dictionary (1st ed., 1968–82)
  • argumentum” on page 59/2 of Jan Frederik Niermeyer’s Mediae Latinitatis Lexicon Minus (1976)