arma

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See also: armá, armà, armâ, armã, and armă

Contents

Aragonese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

Noun[edit]

arma f (plural armas)

  1. weapon

References[edit]


Asturian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Late Latin arma (weapon), from Latin arma (defensive arms).

Noun[edit]

arma f (plural armes)

  1. weapon

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Basque[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Compare Spanish arma.

Noun[edit]

arma

  1. weapon

Declension[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Occitan arma, from Late Latin arma (weapon), from Latin arma (defensive arms), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂(e)rmos (fitting), from the root *h₂er- (to join).

Noun[edit]

arma f (plural armes)

  1. weapon

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

arma

  1. third-person singular present indicative form of armar
  2. second-person singular imperative form of armar

French[edit]

Verb[edit]

arma

  1. third-person singular past historic of armer

Anagrams[edit]


Galician[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Portuguese arma, from Late Latin arma (weapon), from Latin arma (defensive arms).

Noun[edit]

arma f (plural armas)

  1. weapon

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Gothic[edit]

Romanization[edit]

arma

  1. Romanization of 𐌰𐍂𐌼𐌰

Icelandic[edit]

Noun[edit]

arma

  1. indefinite accusative plural of armur
  2. indefinite genitive plural of armur

Interlingua[edit]

Noun[edit]

arma (plural armas)

  1. weapon, arm

Related terms[edit]


Irish[edit]

Noun[edit]

arma

  1. inflection of arm:
    1. vocative plural
    2. (archaic) nominative plural

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Eclipsis with h-prothesis with t-prothesis
arma n-arma harma not applicable
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Italian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈar.ma/, [ˈär̺mä]
  • Rhymes: -arma
  • Stress: àrma
  • Hyphenation: ar‧ma

Etymology 1[edit]

From Late Latin arma (weapon), from Latin arma (defensive arms, weapons of war, war, defense, tools), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂(e)rmos (fitting), from the root *h₂er- (to join).

Noun[edit]

arma f (plural armi) (archaic plural arme)

  1. weapon, arms
  2. (military) arm, force
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

See the etymology of the main entry.

Verb[edit]

arma

  1. third-person singular present indicative of armare
  2. second-person singular imperative of armare

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Indo-European *h₂(e)rmos (fitting), from the root *h₂er- (to join). armentum is an independent derivation from the same root, as if from Proto-Indo-European *h₂er-mn̥-tom. Cognates include Sanskrit ऋत (ṛtá, order; right; agreement etc.) and अरम् (áram, fitting), Ancient Greek ἀραρίσκω (ararískō, to fit together) and Old Armenian արարի (arari, I made).

Semantic development was "that what is fitted together" → "tools" → "weapons". Also related to ars, artus, rītus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

arma n (genitive armōrum); second declension

  1. (plural only) defensive arms, armor/armour, shields, weapons of war.
    • 27 BCE – 25 BCE, Titus Livius, Ab urbe condita libri 29.4:
      munire urbem, frumentum convehere, tela arma parare
      to strengthen the defences of the city, to accumulate stores of corn, to prepare a supply of weapons and armour
  2. (plural only) war
  3. (plural only) soldiers, military power
  4. (plural only) defence
  5. (plural only) tools

Inflection[edit]

Second declension.

Case Plural
Nominative arma
Genitive armōrum
Dative armīs
Accusative arma
Ablative armīs
Vocative arma

Derived terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

arma f (genitive armae); first declension

  1. (Late Latin) weapon

Inflection[edit]

First declension.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative arma armae
Genitive armae armārum
Dative armae armīs
Accusative armam armās
Ablative armā armīs
Vocative arma armae

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • arma in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • arma in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • there seems a prospect of armed violence; things look like violence: res spectat ad vim (arma)
    • to call to arms: ad arma conclamare (Liv. 3. 50)
    • men of military age: qui arma ferre possunt or iuventus
    • men exempt from service owing to age: qui per aetatem arma ferre non possunt or aetate ad bellum inutiles
    • to issue a general call to arms: omnes ad arma convocare
    • to join forces with some one: copias (arma) cum aliquo iungere or se cum aliquo iungere
    • to take up one's arms: arma capere, sumere
    • to make ready for battle: arma expedire (Tusc. 2. 16. 37)
    • to pile arms (cf. sect. XII. 3, note vestem deponere...): arma ponere (not deponere)
    • to wrest weapons from some one's hands: extorquere arma e manibus
    • matters have reached the fighting-stage: res ad arma venit
    • to be the aggressor in a war; to act on the offensive: bellum or arma ultro inferre
    • to surrender weapons: arma tradere
    • to rush to arms: ad arma concurrere
    • to have recourse to force of arms: ad vim et arma descendere (vid. sect. V. 9, note Similarly...)
    • to throw away one's arms: arma abicere
    • (ambiguous) practised in arms: exercitatus in armis
    • (ambiguous) to disarm a person: armis (castris) exuere aliquem
    • (ambiguous) to lay down arms: ab armis discedere (Phil. 11. 33)
    • (ambiguous) to be under arms: in armis esse
    • (ambiguous) to manœuvre: decurrere (in armis)
    • (ambiguous) by force of arms: vi et armis
    • (ambiguous) to fight a decisive battle: proelio, armis decertare (B. G. 1. 50)
    • (ambiguous) to fight a pitched battle: acie (armis, ferro) decernere
  • De Vaan, Michiel (2008) Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 7), Leiden, Boston: Brill, page 54

Occitan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Occitan arma, from Late Latin arma (weapon), from Latin arma (defensive arms).

Noun[edit]

arma f (plural armas)

  1. weapon

Related terms[edit]


Old Norse[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From armr.

Noun[edit]

arma f (genitive ǫrmu, plural ǫrmur)

  1. pity

Declension[edit]

References[edit]

  • arma in Geir T. Zoëga (1910) A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, Oxford: Clarendon Press

Old Occitan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Late Latin arma (weapon), from Latin arma (defensive arms).

Adjective[edit]

arma f (oblique plural armas, nominative singular arma, nominative plural armas)

  1. weapon

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]


Old Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Late Latin arma (weapon), from Latin arma (defensive arms), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂(e)rmos (fitting).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

arma f (plural armas)

  1. weapon; arm

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Portuguese arma, from Late Latin arma (weapon), from Latin arma (defensive arms), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂(e)rmos (fitting), from the root *h₂er- (to join).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

arma f (plural armas)

  1. weapon

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

arma

  1. Third-person singular (ele, ela, also used with tu and você?) present indicative of armar
  2. Second-person singular (tu) affirmative imperative of armar

Quechua[edit]

Noun[edit]

arma

  1. basin, sink, bathtub
  2. the Big Dipper

Declension[edit]

See also[edit]


Romanian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin armāre, present active infinitive of armō.

Alternative forms[edit]

Verb[edit]

a arma (third-person singular present armează, past participle armat1st conj.

  1. to prepare a weapon for firing
  2. to arm, equip
  3. (figuratively) to strengthen by adding reinforcement (e.g. armor, a mineshaft, etc.)
Conjugation[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from French armer.

Verb[edit]

a arma (third-person singular present armează, past participle armat1st conj.

  1. to launch a ship in service with all necessary equipment

Etymology 3[edit]

Noun[edit]

arma f

  1. definite singular nominative and accusative form of armă.

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Spanish arma, from Late Latin arma (weapon), from Latin arma (defensive arms), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂(e)rmos (fitting), from the root *h₂er- (to join).

Noun[edit]

arma f (plural armas)

  1. weapon, arm
    El arma secretathe secret weapon
    Las armas secretasthe secret weapons

Usage notes[edit]

  • The feminine noun arma is like other feminine nouns starting with a stressed a sound in that it takes the definite article el (normally reserved for masculine nouns) in the singular when there is no intervening adjective:
el arma
  • However, if an adjective, even one that begins with a stressed a sound such as alta or ancha, intervenes between the article and the noun, the article reverts to la.

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Verb[edit]

arma

  1. Informal second-person singular () affirmative imperative form of armar.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present indicative form of armar.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present indicative form of armar.

Swedish[edit]

Adjective[edit]

arma

  1. absolute singular definite and plural form of arm.