arma

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See also: armá, armà, armâ, armã, and armă

Asturian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin arma.

Noun[edit]

arma f ‎(plural armes)

  1. weapon

Derived terms[edit]


Basque[edit]

Noun[edit]

arma

  1. weapon

Declension[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin arma.

Noun[edit]

arma f ‎(plural armes)

  1. weapon

Derived terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

arma

  1. third-person singular present indicative form of armar
  2. second-person singular imperative form of armar

French[edit]

Verb[edit]

arma

  1. third-person singular past historic of armer

Anagrams[edit]


Galician[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin arma.

Noun[edit]

arma f ‎(plural armas)

  1. weapon

Derived terms[edit]


Gothic[edit]

Romanization[edit]

arma

  1. Romanization of 𐌰𐍂𐌼𐌰

Icelandic[edit]

Noun[edit]

arma

  1. indefinite accusative plural of armur
  2. indefinite genitive plural of armur

Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Late Latin arma, from Latin arma(weapons of war, war, defence, tools), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂(e)rmos(fitting), from the root *h₂er-(to join).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈar.ma/, [ˈär̺mä]
  • Hyphenation: àr‧ma

Noun[edit]

arma f ‎(plural armi) (archaic plural arme)

  1. weapon, arms
  2. (military) arm, force

Verb[edit]

arma

  1. third-person singular present indicative of armare
  2. second-person singular imperative of armare

Related terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Indo-European *h₂(e)rmos(fitting), from the root *h₂er-(to join). armentum is an independent derivation from the same root, as if from Proto-Indo-European *h₂er-mn̥-tom. Cognates include Sanskrit ऋत(ṛtá, order; right; agreement etc.) and अरम्(áram, fitting), Ancient Greek ἀραρίσκω(ararískō, to fit together) and Old Armenian արարի(arari, I made).

Semantic development was "that what is fitted together" → "tools" → "weapons". Also related to ars, artus, rītus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

arma n ‎(genitive armōrum); second declension

  1. (plural only) defensive arms, armor/armour, shields, weapons of war.
    • 27 BCE – 25 BCE, Titus Livius, Ab urbe condita libri 29.4
      munire urbem, frumentum convehere, tela arma parare
      to strengthen the defences of the city, to accumulate stores of corn, to prepare a supply of weapons and armour
  2. (plural only) war
  3. (plural only) soldiers, military power
  4. (plural only) defence
  5. (plural only) tools

Inflection[edit]

Second declension.

Case Plural
nominative arma
genitive armōrum
dative armīs
accusative arma
ablative armīs
vocative arma

Derived terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

arma f ‎(genitive armae); first declension

  1. (Late Latin) weapon

Inflection[edit]

First declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative arma armae
genitive armae armārum
dative armae armīs
accusative armam armās
ablative armā armīs
vocative arma armae

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • arma in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • Félix Gaffiot (1934), Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Paris: Hachette, s.v.arma”.
  • Meissner, Carl; Auden, Henry William (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • there seems a prospect of armed violence; things look like violence: res spectat ad vim (arma)
    • to call to arms: ad arma conclamare (Liv. 3. 50)
    • men of military age: qui arma ferre possunt or iuventus
    • men exempt from service owing to age: qui per aetatem arma ferre non possunt or aetate ad bellum inutiles
    • to issue a general call to arms: omnes ad arma convocare
    • to join forces with some one: copias (arma) cum aliquo iungere or se cum aliquo iungere
    • to take up one's arms: arma capere, sumere
    • to make ready for battle: arma expedire (Tusc. 2. 16. 37)
    • to pile arms (cf. sect. XII. 3, note vestem deponere...): arma ponere (not deponere)
    • to wrest weapons from some one's hands: extorquere arma e manibus
    • matters have reached the fighting-stage: res ad arma venit
    • to be the aggressor in a war; to act on the offensive: bellum or arma ultro inferre
    • to surrender weapons: arma tradere
    • to rush to arms: ad arma concurrere
    • to have recourse to force of arms: ad vim et arma descendere (vid. sect. V. 9, note Similarly...)
    • to throw away one's arms: arma abicere
    • (ambiguous) practised in arms: exercitatus in armis
    • (ambiguous) to disarm a person: armis (castris) exuere aliquem
    • (ambiguous) to lay down arms: ab armis discedere (Phil. 11. 33)
    • (ambiguous) to be under arms: in armis esse
    • (ambiguous) to manœuvre: decurrere (in armis)
    • (ambiguous) by force of arms: vi et armis
    • (ambiguous) to fight a decisive battle: proelio, armis decertare (B. G. 1. 50)
    • (ambiguous) to fight a pitched battle: acie (armis, ferro) decernere
  • De Vaan, Michiel (2008) Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 7), Leiden, Boston: Brill, page 54

Occitan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin arma.

Noun[edit]

arma f (plural armas)

  1. weapon

Old Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin arma(weapon), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂(e)rmos(fitting).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

arma f ‎(plural armas)

  1. weapon; arm

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Old Provençal[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Latin arma.

Adjective[edit]

arma f ‎(oblique plural armas, nominative singular arma, nominative plural armas)

  1. weapon

References[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Portuguese arma, from Latin arma(weapon), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂(e)rmos(fitting), from the root *h₂er-(to join).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

arma f (plural armas)

  1. weapon

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

arma

  1. Third-person singular (ele, ela, also used with tu and você?) present indicative of armar
  2. Second-person singular (tu) affirmative imperative of armar

Quechua[edit]

Noun[edit]

arma

  1. basin, sink, bathtub
  2. the Big Dipper

Declension[edit]

See also[edit]


Romanian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin armāre, present active infinitive of armō.

Alternative forms[edit]

Verb[edit]

a arma ‎(third-person singular present armează, past participle armat1st conj.

  1. to prepare a weapon for firing
  2. to arm, equip
  3. (figuratively) to strengthen by adding reinforcement (e.g. armor, a mineshaft, etc.)
Conjugation[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From French armer.

Verb[edit]

a arma ‎(third-person singular present armează, past participle armat1st conj.

  1. to launch a ship in service with all necessary equipment

Etymology 3[edit]

Noun[edit]

arma f

  1. definite singular nominative and accusative form of armă.

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin arma, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂(e)rmos(fitting), from the root *h₂er-(to join).

Noun[edit]

arma f ‎(plural armas)

  1. weapon, arm
    El arma secreta‎ ― the secret weapon
    Las armas secretas‎ ― the secret weapons

Usage notes[edit]

  • The feminine noun arma is like other feminine nouns starting with a stressed a sound in that it takes the definite article el (normally reserved for masculine nouns) in the singular when there is no intervening adjective:
el arma
  • However, if an adjective intervenes between the article and the noun, the article reverts to la.

Derived terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

arma

  1. Informal second-person singular () affirmative imperative form of armar.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present indicative form of armar.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present indicative form of armar.

Swedish[edit]

Adjective[edit]

arma

  1. absolute singular definite and plural form of arm.