arpeggio

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See also: arpeggiò

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Italian arpeggio, from arpeggiare (to play a harp).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (General American) IPA(key): /ɑɹˈpɛ.d͡ʒi.oʊ/
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

arpeggio (plural arpeggios or arpeggi)

  1. (music) The notes of a chord played individually instead of simultaneously, usually moving from lowest to highest.
    • 1956, Delano Ames, chapter 14, in Crime out of Mind[1]:
      He struck the opening chords of the passage; but this time Irene's voice was silent. Victor stopped in the middle of an arpeggio.

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Verb[edit]

arpeggio (third-person singular simple present arpeggios, present participle arpeggioing, simple past and past participle arpeggioed)

  1. (transitive) To play (a chord) as an arpeggio; to play (a piece of music) with arpeggios.
    Synonym: arpeggiate
    • 1819, Abraham Rees (ed.), The Cyclopædia, London: Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme & Brown, Volume 14, entry “Fingering on Keyed Instruments,”[2]
      In practising quick passages, the fingers should be lifted up with a spring, and not allowed to hang on the keys, till wanted again, unless in arpeggioing chords, or in passages of expression.
    • 1872, Samuel Butler, Erewhon, London: Trübner, Chapter 4, p. 29,[3]
      [] I could see a man with his head buried forward towards a key-board, and his body swaying from side to side amid the storm of huge arpeggioed harmonies that came crashing overhead and round.
    • 1902, Booth Tarkington, The Two Vanrevels, New York: McClure, Phillips, Chapter 1, p. 11,[4]
      [] having finished her piano-forte practice, touched her harp twice, and arpeggioed the Spanish Fandango on her guitar, Miss Betty read two paragraphs of “Gilbert” []
    • 1990, Marcel Montecino, Big Time, New York: William Morrow, Book 3, p. 197,[5]
      When his fingers touched the piano, he formed a D7 chord, arpeggioed it up the inversions, then started singing and playing the “Happy Birthday” song.
  2. (intransitive) To produce arpeggios; to produce sounds resembling arpeggios.
    • 1898, Edward Noyes Westcott, David Harum, New York: Grosset & Dunlap, Chapter 37, p. 314,[6]
      Herr Schlitz seated himself on the piano chair, pushed it a little back, drew it a little forward to the original place, looked under the piano at the pedals, took out his handkerchief and wiped his face and hands, and after arpeggioing up and down the keyboard, swung into a waltz of Chopin’s []
    • 1909, O. Henry, “Whistling Dick’s Christmas Stocking” in Roads of Destiny, Garden City, NY: Doubleday, p. 357,[7]
      The soaring sound [of the whistling] rippled and trilled and arpeggioed as the songs of wild birds do not;
    • 2012, Roshi Fernando, “At the Barn Dance” in Homesick, New York: Vintage, p. 166,[8]
      The accordion player arpeggioed through a chord []
  3. (transitive, intransitive, figuratively) To move (the hand or fingers) against a surface as if playing arpeggios on a keyboard; to touch different points in succession along a surface.
    • 1931, Kate O’Brien, Without My Cloak, London: Penguin, 1987, Book 2, Chapter 8, p. 187,[9]
      Her hand was still arpeggioing softly on his arm.
    • 1966, Richard Lancaster, Piegan: A Look from Within at the Life, Times, and Legacy of an American Indian Tribe, Garden City, NY: Doubleday, p. 168,[10]
      the prickle of horripilation which arpeggioed my spine as I came barrelling down the hill from that ghost house
    • 2009, Kevin Crossley-Holland, The Hidden Roads, London: Quercus, p. 136,[11]
      While we thanked him for having us and told him the car was packed, and so on, he arpeggioed his stumpy fingers across his scarlet blanket.

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From the verb arpeggiare, from arpa.

Noun[edit]

arpeggio m (plural arpeggi)

  1. arpeggio

Descendants[edit]

Verb[edit]

arpeggio

  1. first-person singular present indicative of arpeggiare

Anagrams[edit]


Polish[edit]

Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Italian arpeggio.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

arpeggio n

  1. (music) arpeggio

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

adjective

Further reading[edit]

  • arpeggio in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • arpeggio in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Portuguese[edit]

Noun[edit]

arpeggio m (plural arpeggios)

  1. (uncommon) Alternative form of arpejo