at

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Contents

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (stressed) enPR: ăt, IPA(key): /æt/
    • (file)
    • Rhymes: -æt
    • Homophone: @
  • (unstressed) IPA(key): /ət/
    • Homophone: it (unstressed; only in some accents)

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English at, from Old English æt (at, near, by, toward), from Proto-Germanic *at (at, near, to), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂éd (near, at). Cognate with Scots at (at), North Frisian äät, äit, et, it (at), Danish at (to), Swedish åt (for, toward), Norwegian åt (to), Faroese at (at, to, toward), Icelandic (to, towards), Gothic 𐌰𐍄 (at, at), Latin ad (to, near).

Preposition[edit]

at

  1. In or very near a particular place.
    at that precise position;  at Jim’s house
    • 1908, W[illiam] B[lair] M[orton] Ferguson, chapter IV, in Zollenstein, New York, N.Y.: D. Appleton & Company, OCLC 731476803:
      “My Continental prominence is improving,” I commented dryly. ¶ Von Lindowe cut at a furze bush with his silver-mounted rattan. ¶ “Quite so,” he said as dryly, his hand at his mustache. “I may say if your intentions were known your life would not be worth a curse.”
    • 1992, Rudolf M. Schuster, The Hepaticae and Anthocerotae of North America: East of the Hundredth Meridian, volume V, page 4
      (b) sporophyte with foot reduced, the entire sporophyte enveloped by the calyptra, which is ± stipitate at the base.
  2. (indicating time) Indicating occurrence in an instant of time or a period of time relatively short in context or from the speaker's perspective.
    at six o’clock;  at closing time;  at night.
    • 1838, The Family Magazine
      Lafayette was major-general in the American army at the age of 18 []
    • 2012 April 19, Josh Halliday, “Free speech haven or lawless cesspool – can the internet be civilised?”, in the Guardian:
      Other global taboos, such as sex and suicide, manifest themselves widely online, with websites offering suicide guides and Hot XXX Action seconds away at the click of a button. The UK government will come under pressure to block access to pornographic websites this year when a committee of MPs publishes its report on protecting children online.
  3. In the direction of (often in an unfocused or uncaring manner).
    He threw the ball at me.  He shouted at her.
    • 1908, W[illiam] B[lair] M[orton] Ferguson, chapter IV, in Zollenstein, New York, N.Y.: D. Appleton & Company, OCLC 731476803:
      “My Continental prominence is improving,” I commented dryly. ¶ Von Lindowe cut at a furze bush with his silver-mounted rattan. ¶ “Quite so,” he said as dryly, his hand at his mustache. “I may say if your intentions were known your life would not be worth a curse.”
  4. Denotes a price.
    3 apples at 2¢ (each)   The offer was at $30,000 before negotiations.
  5. Occupied in (activity).
    men at work
  6. In a state of.
    She is at sixes and sevens with him.  They are at loggerheads over how best to tackle the fiscal cliff.The city was at the mercy of the occupying forces.
  7. Indicates a position on a scale or in a series.
    Sell at 90.  Tiger finished the round at tenth, seven strokes behind the leaders.I'm offering it—just to select customers—at cost.
  8. Because of.
    to laugh at a joke   mad at their comments
  9. Indicates a means, method, or manner.
    • 1995, Richard Klein, Cigarettes are Sublime →ISBN, page 41:
      [...] to be sold at auction for sixty gold francs.
    • 2012, Sami Moubayed, Syria and the USA: Washington's Relations with Damascus →ISBN:
      A few days later, on 1 October, King Hussein opened the Jordanian Parliament by speaking at length about the crisis in Syria,
  10. Holding a given speed or rate.
    It is growing at the rate of 3% a year.  Cruising along at fifty miles per hour.
  11. (used for skills (including in activities) or areas of knowledge) On the subject of; regarding.
    The twins were both bad at chemistry.
    He slipped at marksmanship over his extended vacation.
    • 2015, Sanyan Stories: Favorites from a Ming Dynasty Collection →ISBN, page 157:
      She's good at playing musical instruments, singing and dancing, chess, calligraphy, and painting.
  12. (Ireland, stressed pronunciation) Bothering, irritating, causing discomfort to
    • 1995 Keith Wood, quoted in David Hughes, "Wood odds-on to take one against the head", in The Independent (London) 18 January:
      I think `Jesus, my back is at me'. Then I get the ball. Off you go for 10 yards and you don't feel a thing. Then you stop and think: `Jesus, it's at me again'[.]
    • 2014 Marian Keyes "Antarctic Diary - Part 2" personal website (January 2014):
      He seems to be saying. “Ah, go on, you’re making the other lads feel bad.” But the 4th fella says, “No. Don’t be ‘at’ me. I’m just not in the form right now, I’ll stay where I am, thanks.”
Usage notes[edit]
  • He threw the ball to me — (so I could catch it).
  • He threw the ball at me — (trying to hit me with it).
  • He talked to her — (conversationally).
  • He shouted at her — (aggressively).
Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

at (plural ats)

  1. The at sign (@).
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

at (plural ats or at)

  1. Alternative form of att (Laos currency unit)

Anagrams[edit]


Azerbaijani[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Turkic *at (horse).

Noun[edit]

Other scripts
Cyrillic ат
Roman at
Perso-Arabic آت

at (definite accusative atı, plural atlar)

  1. horse

Declension[edit]


Chuukese[edit]

Noun[edit]

at

  1. boy

Danish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /at/, [æd̥], /a/, [æ]

Conjunction[edit]

at

  1. that

Particle[edit]

at

  1. to (infinitive-marker)
    Det er menneskeligt at fejle.
    To err is human.

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

at

  1. singular past indicative of eten
  2. first-, second- and third-person singular present indicative of atten
  3. imperative of atten

Faroese[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse at.

Preposition[edit]

at

  1. (with dative) at, towards, to

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse at (that), from Proto-Germanic *þat (that). Cognate with Middle English at (that, conjunction and relative pronoun), Scots at (that, conjunction and relative pronoun). More at that.

Conjunction[edit]

at

  1. that

Etymology 3[edit]

From Old Norse at (at, to), from Proto-Germanic *at (at, to). More at at.

Particle[edit]

at

  1. to A particle used to mark the following verb as an infinitive.
    At lyfta.To lift

Friulian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin actus; cf. Italian atto.

Noun[edit]

at m (plural ats)

  1. act, action, deed

Related terms[edit]


Gothic[edit]

Romanization[edit]

at

  1. Romanization of 𐌰𐍄

Icelandic[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

at n (genitive singular ats, nominative plural öt)

  1. fight

Declension[edit]


Irish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Irish att (swelling, protuberance, tumour).

Noun[edit]

at m (genitive singular as substantive ait, genitive as verbal noun ata, nominative plural atanna)

  1. swelling
    • 1899, Franz Nikolaus Finck, Die araner mundart, Marburg: Elwert’sche Verlagsbuchhandlung, vol. II, p. 11:
      at ə l̄āv m inīnə.
      conventional orthography: at i lámh m’iníne.
      My daughter has a swelling on her hand.
    • 1899, Franz Nikolaus Finck, Die araner mundart, Marburg: Elwert’sche Verlagsbuchhandlung, vol. II, p. 11:
      tā šȧxt n-at i n-ə wunāl.
      conventional orthography: Tá seacht n-at ina mhuineál.
      He has seven swellings on his neck.
    • 1899, Franz Nikolaus Finck, Die araner mundart, Marburg: Elwert’sche Verlagsbuchhandlung, vol. II, p. 11:
      kiŕ də lāv ə n̄-isḱə leš n̥ t-at ə wȳlū.
      conventional orthography: Cuir do lámh in uisce leis an t-at a maolú.
      Put your hand in water to reduce the swelling.
  2. verbal noun of at
Declension[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Irish attaid (swells, dilates, increases, verb), from att (swelling, protuberance, tumour).

Verb[edit]

at (present analytic atann, future analytic atfaidh, verbal noun at, past participle ata)

  1. (intransitive) swell
    • 1899, Franz Nikolaus Finck, Die araner mundart, Marburg: Elwert’sche Verlagsbuchhandlung, vol. II, p. 11:
      tā ə h-ēdn̥ atī.
      conventional orthography: Tá a héadan ataithe.
      Her face is swollen.
    • 1899, Franz Nikolaus Finck, Die araner mundart, Marburg: Elwert’sche Verlagsbuchhandlung, vol. II, p. 11:
      tā mə lāv atī.
      conventional orthography: Tá mo lámh ataithe.
      My hand is swollen.
    Synonym: borr
  2. (intransitive) bloat
  3. (intransitive, of sea) heave
Conjugation[edit]
  • Alternative past participle: ataithe

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Eclipsis with h-prothesis with t-prothesis
at n-at hat not applicable
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading[edit]

  • "at" in Foclóir Gaeilge-Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
  • att” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.
  • attaid” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.
  • “at” in Foclóir Gaeḋilge agus Béarla, Irish Texts Society, 1st ed., 1904, by Patrick S. Dinneen, page 42.
  • “ataim” in Foclóir Gaeḋilge agus Béarla, Irish Texts Society, 2nd ed., 1927, by Patrick S. Dinneen.
  • Entries containing “at” in New English-Irish Dictionary by Foras na Gaeilge.

Ladin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin actus.

Noun[edit]

at m (plural ac)

  1. act
  2. action
  3. work

Latin[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

at

  1. but, yet
  2. whereas

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • at in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • at in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • at in Geir T. Zoëga (1910) A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • at in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)

Livonian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Verb[edit]

at

  1. 3rd person plural present indicative form of vȱlda

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse at. Cognate with Danish at and Swedish att.

Pronunciation[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

at

  1. that

References[edit]

“at” in The Bokmål Dictionary.


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse at. Cognate with Danish at and Swedish att.

Pronunciation[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

at

  1. that

References[edit]

“at” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.


Old Irish[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • it (second-person singular)
  • ata (third-person plural relative)

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (second-person singular): IPA(key): /at/
  • (third-person plural relative): IPA(key): /ad/

Verb[edit]

at

  1. second-person singular present indicative of is
  2. third-person plural present indicative relative of is

Old Norse[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *atǭ. Related to Old English etja.

Noun[edit]

at n (genitive ats, plural ǫt)

  1. conflict, fight, battle
Declension[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • Icelandic: at

Etymology 2[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *þat (that). Cognate with Old English þæt, Gothic 𐌸𐌰𐍄𐌰 (þata).

Conjunction[edit]

at

  1. that
  2. since, because, as
Descendants[edit]
  • Faroese: at
  • Icelandic:

Etymology 3[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *at (at, to). Cognate with Old English æt, Old Frisian et, Old Saxon at, Old High German az, Gothic 𐌰𐍄 (at).

Particle[edit]

at

  1. to (infinitive particle)
Descendants[edit]
  • Faroese: at
  • Icelandic:

Preposition[edit]

at

  1. at, to
Descendants[edit]
  • Faroese: at
  • Icelandic:

References[edit]

  • at in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • at in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • at in Geir T. Zoëga (1910) A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • at in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)

Pipil[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Nahuan *ātla, from Proto-Uto-Aztecan *paha or *pahi. Cognate to Classical Nahuatl ātl (water), Yaqui baaʔam (water), Hopi paahu (water, spring), Cahuilla pál (water), and Shoshone paa (water).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

āt (plural ajāt)

  1. water
    Shikuni chiupi at
    Drink some water

Scots[edit]

Preposition[edit]

at

  1. at

Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Irish att.

Noun[edit]

at m

  1. swelling, tumour
  2. protuberance, prominence
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Irish attaid (swells, dilates, increases, verb), from att (swelling, protuberance, tumour).

Verb[edit]

at (past dh'at, future ataidh, verbal noun at or atadh, past participle athte)

  1. swell, fester, puff up, become tumid

Mutation[edit]

Scottish Gaelic mutation
Radical Eclipsis with h-prothesis with t-prothesis
at n-at h-at t-at
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading[edit]

  • Faclair Gàidhlig Dwelly Air Loidhne, Dwelly, Edward (1911), Faclair Gàidhlig gu Beurla le Dealbhan/The Illustrated [Scottish] Gaelic-English Dictionary (10th ed.), Edinburgh: Birlinn Limited, →ISBN
  • att” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.
  • attaid” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.

Selaru[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Central-Eastern Malayo-Polynesian *əpat, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *əpat, from Proto-Austronesian *Səpat.

Numeral[edit]

at

  1. (cardinal) four

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Ottoman Turkish آت (at).

Noun[edit]

at m (Cyrillic spelling ат)

  1. steed
  2. Arabian (horse)

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Simeulue[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *əpat, from Proto-Austronesian *Səpat.

Numeral[edit]

at

  1. (cardinal) four

Tagalog[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

at

  1. and
    Synonym: saka

See also[edit]


Torres Strait Creole[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English heart.

Noun[edit]

at

  1. heart

Turkish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Ottoman Turkish آت (at, horse), from Proto-Turkic *at, *ăt (horse). Cognate with Karakhanid اَتْ (at, horse), Old Turkic 𐱃 (at, horse).

Noun[edit]

at (definite accusative atı, plural atlar)

  1. (zoology) horse
  2. (chess) knight
Declension[edit]
Inflection
Nominative at
Definite accusative atı
Singular Plural
Nominative at atlar
Definite accusative atı atları
Dative ata atlara
Locative atta atlarda
Ablative attan atlardan
Genitive atın atların
Possessive forms
Singular Plural
1st singular atım atlarım
2nd singular atın atların
3rd singular atı atları
1st plural atımız atlarımız
2nd plural atınız atlarınız
3rd plural atları atları
Predicative forms
Singular Plural
1st singular atım atlarım
2nd singular atsın atlarsın
3rd singular at
attır
atlar
atlardır
1st plural atız atlarız
2nd plural atsınız atlarsınız
3rd plural atlar atlardır
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

at

  1. second-person singular imperative of atmak

Further reading[edit]

  • at in Turkish dictionaries at Türk Dil Kurumu

Turkmen[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Turkic *at, *ăt (horse).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

at (definite accusative ady, plural atlar)

  1. horse
Declension[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Proto-Turkic *āt (name). Cognate with Old Turkic 𐰀𐱃 (āt, name), Chuvash ят (jat, name), Turkish ad.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

at (definite accusative ady, plural atlar)

  1. name
Declension[edit]

Volapük[edit]

Determiner[edit]

at

  1. (demonstrative) this

Wakhi[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Cognate with Yagnobi ашт.

Numeral[edit]

at

  1. eight

Welsh[edit]

Etymology[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

Pronunciation[edit]

Preposition[edit]

at

  1. to, towards
  2. for
  3. at
  4. by

Usage notes[edit]

This preposition causes the soft mutation.

Inflection[edit]


West Frisian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

at

  1. if
    Synonym: as

Wolof[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

at

  1. year