at

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English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English at, from Old English æt (at, near, by, toward), from Proto-Germanic *at (at, near, to), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂éd (near, at). Cognate with Scots at (at), North Frisian äät, äit, et, it (at), Danish at (to), Swedish åt (for, toward), Norwegian åt (to), Faroese at (at, to, toward), Icelandic (to, towards), Gothic 𐌰𐍄 (at, at), Latin ad (to, near).

Preposition[edit]

at

  1. In, near, or in the general vicinity of a particular place.
    Caesar was at Rome
    at the corner of Fourth Street and Vine
    at Jim’s house
    • 1908, W[illiam] B[lair] M[orton] Ferguson, chapter IV, in Zollenstein, New York, N.Y.: D. Appleton & Company, OCLC 731476803:
      “My Continental prominence is improving,” I commented dryly.
      Von Lindowe cut at a furze bush with his silver-mounted rattan.
      “Quite so,” he said as dryly, his hand at his mustache. “I may say if your intentions were known your life would not be worth a curse.”
    • 1919, Plutarch, Parallel Lives, "The Life of Cicero", 43 (Bernadotte Perrin, trans.)
      "Hirtius and Pansa, who were good men and admirers of Cicero, begged him not to desert them, and undertook to put down Antony if Cicero would remain at Rome."
    • 1992, Rudolf M[athias] Schuster, The Hepaticae and Anthocerotae of North America: East of the Hundredth Meridian, volume V, New York, N.Y.: Columbia University Press, →ISBN, page 4:
      (b) sporophyte with foot reduced, the entire sporophyte enveloped by the calyptra, which is ± stipitate at the base.
    • 2016, VOA Learning English (public domain)
      Today my friend Marsha is at her friend's house.
      (file)
  2. (indicating time) Indicating occurrence in an instant of time or a period of time relatively short in context or from the speaker's perspective.
    at six o’clock
    at closing time
    at night
    • 1838, The Family Magazine
      Lafayette was major-general in the American army at the age of 18 []
    • 2012 April 19, Josh Halliday, “Free speech haven or lawless cesspool – can the internet be civilised?”, in the Guardian:
      Other global taboos, such as sex and suicide, manifest themselves widely online, with websites offering suicide guides and Hot XXX Action seconds away at the click of a button. The UK government will come under pressure to block access to pornographic websites this year when a committee of MPs publishes its report on protecting children online.
    • 2016, VOA Learning English (public domain)
      Hi, Anne. Are you busy? — Hi, Anna. Yes. At 10 a.m. I am writing.
      (file)
  3. In the direction of (often in an unfocused or uncaring manner).
    He threw the ball at me.
    He shouted at her.
    • 1908, W[illiam] B[lair] M[orton] Ferguson, chapter IV, in Zollenstein, New York, N.Y.: D. Appleton & Company, OCLC 731476803:
      “My Continental prominence is improving,” I commented dryly.
      Von Lindowe cut at a furze bush with his silver-mounted rattan.
      “Quite so,” he said as dryly, his hand at his mustache. “I may say if your intentions were known your life would not be worth a curse.”
  4. Denotes a price.
    3 apples at 2¢ (each)
    The offer was at $30,000 before negotiations.
  5. Occupied in (activity).
    men at work
  6. In a state of.
    She is at sixes and sevens with him.
    They are at loggerheads over how best to tackle the fiscal cliff.
    The city was at the mercy of the occupying forces.
  7. Indicates a position on a scale or in a series.
    Sell at 90.
    Tiger finished the round at tenth, seven strokes behind the leaders.
    I'm offering it—just to select customers—at cost.
  8. Because of.
    to laugh at a joke
    mad at their comments
  9. Indicates a means, method, or manner.
    • 1995, Richard Klein, Cigarettes are Sublime, →ISBN, page 41:
      [...] to be sold at auction for sixty gold francs.
    • 2012, Sami Moubayed, Syria and the USA: Washington's Relations with Damascus, →ISBN:
      A few days later, on 1 October, King Hussein opened the Jordanian Parliament by speaking at length about the crisis in Syria,
  10. Holding a given speed or rate.
    It is growing at the rate of 3% a year.
    Cruising along at fifty miles per hour.
  11. (used for skills (including in activities) or areas of knowledge) On the subject of; regarding.
    The twins were both bad at chemistry.
    He slipped at marksmanship over his extended vacation.
    • 2015, Sanyan Stories: Favorites from a Ming Dynasty Collection →ISBN, page 157:
      She's good at playing musical instruments, singing and dancing, chess, calligraphy, and painting.
  12. (Ireland, stressed pronunciation) Bothering, irritating, causing discomfort to
    • 1995 Keith Wood, quoted in David Hughes, "Wood odds-on to take one against the head", in The Independent (London) 18 January:
      I think 'Jesus, my back is at me'. Then I get the ball. Off you go for 10 yards and you don't feel a thing. Then you stop and think: `Jesus, it's at me again'[.]
    • 2014 Marian Keyes "Antarctic Diary - Part 2" personal website (January 2014):
      He seems to be saying. “Ah, go on, you’re making the other lads feel bad.” But the 4th fella says, “No. Don’t be ‘at’ me. I’m just not in the form right now, I’ll stay where I am, thanks.”
  13. (UK, Commonwealth of Nations, Ireland, especially finance) (also as at; before dates) On a particular date.
    • n.d., quoted in Longmans Business Dictionary:
      balance as at 20th March 1999
Usage notes[edit]
  • He threw the ball to me — (so I could catch it).
  • He threw the ball at me — (trying to hit me with it).
  • He talked to her — (conversationally).
  • He shouted at her — (aggressively).
Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

at (plural ats)

  1. The at sign (@).
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

at (third-person singular simple present ats, present participle atting, simple past and past participle atted)

  1. (informal, neologism) Rare form of @; to reply to or talk to someone, either online or face-to-face. (from the practice of targeting a message or reply to someone online by writing @name)
    • 2022: William Morris, Motley Vision
      If you have questions or observations on my discussion questions, feel free to reply to this email, at me on Twitter, or comment on the companion post on AMV.
Usage notes[edit]

Chiefly used in the phrase "don't @ me"/"don't at me". It can be used humorously when stated after an unpopular or ironic opinion, to forestall dissent.

Etymology 2[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

at

  1. (Northern England, rare, possibly obsolete) Alternative form of 'at (relative pronoun; reduced form of "that" and/or "what")
    • 1860, Robert Gordon Latham, Song of Solomon, as spoken in Durham [by Thomas Moore], in A hand-book of the English language:
      Tak us t' foxes, t' little foxes at spoils t' veynes: fer our veynes hev tender grapes.

Etymology 3[edit]

Noun[edit]

at (plural ats or at)

  1. Alternative form of att (Laos currency unit)

Anagrams[edit]


Azerbaijani[edit]

Other scripts
Cyrillic ат
Perso-Arabic آت

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Turkic *at (horse).[1]

Noun[edit]

at (definite accusative atı, plural atlar)

  1. horse
  2. (chess) knight
Declension[edit]
    Declension of at
singular plural
nominative at
atlar
definite accusative atı
atları
dative ata
atlara
locative atda
atlarda
ablative atdan
atlardan
definite genitive atın
atların
    Possessive forms of at
nominative
singular plural
mənim (my) atım atlarım
sənin (your) atın atların
onun (his/her/its) atı atları
bizim (our) atımız atlarımız
sizin (your) atınız atlarınız
onların (their) atı or atları atları
accusative
singular plural
mənim (my) atımı atlarımı
sənin (your) atını atlarını
onun (his/her/its) atını atlarını
bizim (our) atımızı atlarımızı
sizin (your) atınızı atlarınızı
onların (their) atını or atlarını atlarını
dative
singular plural
mənim (my) atıma atlarıma
sənin (your) atına atlarına
onun (his/her/its) atına atlarına
bizim (our) atımıza atlarımıza
sizin (your) atınıza atlarınıza
onların (their) atına or atlarına atlarına
locative
singular plural
mənim (my) atımda atlarımda
sənin (your) atında atlarında
onun (his/her/its) atında atlarında
bizim (our) atımızda atlarımızda
sizin (your) atınızda atlarınızda
onların (their) atında or atlarında atlarında
ablative
singular plural
mənim (my) atımdan atlarımdan
sənin (your) atından atlarından
onun (his/her/its) atından atlarından
bizim (our) atımızdan atlarımızdan
sizin (your) atınızdan atlarınızdan
onların (their) atından or atlarından atlarından
genitive
singular plural
mənim (my) atımın atlarımın
sənin (your) atının atlarının
onun (his/her/its) atının atlarının
bizim (our) atımızın atlarımızın
sizin (your) atınızın atlarınızın
onların (their) atının or atlarının atlarının

See also[edit]

Chess pieces in Azerbaijani · şahmat fiquru (layout · text)
♚ ♛ ♜ ♝ ♞ ♟
şah vəzir top fil at piyada

References[edit]

  1. ^ Starostin, Sergei; Dybo, Anna; Mudrak, Oleg (2003), “*ăt”, in Etymological dictionary of the Altaic languages (Handbuch der Orientalistik; VIII.8), Leiden, New York, Köln: E.J. Brill

Further reading[edit]

  • at” in Obastan.com.

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

at

  1. second-person singular imperative of atmaq

Bikol Central[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Tagalog at.

Pronunciation[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

at

  1. (Daet) and
    Synonyms: asin, saka, buda, sagkod, nan, tapos

Chuukese[edit]

Noun[edit]

at

  1. boy

Danish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse at, cf. Swedish att, Norwegian at. Probably from Proto-Germanic *þat, a demonstrative pronoun used as a conjunction, compare English that, German dass, Dutch dat.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ad/, [æ(d̥)], [æ(t)]

Conjunction[edit]

at

  1. that (introduces a noun clause functioning as the subject, object or predicative of a verb, or as the object of a prepositional phrase)
  2. (archaic) that, in order that, so that (introduces an adverbial clause stating the purpose)
    • 1856, Christian Winther, Hr. Peder Jernskjæg, from Hjortens Flugt / https://kalliope.org/da/text/winther2018100610:
      Og Hjorten vil jeg fange, | At Korset jeg kan faae.
      And the deer, I will catch, that I may win the cross.
    • 1987, Thomas Bruun, Et paradisisk blik. Humoresker og grotesker:
      det er helvedes svært, at du bare ved det.
      it is damned difficult, just that you know it.
    Synonym: for at
  3. that, so that (introduces an adverbial clause stating the result, normally after a demonstrative adverb or pronoun)
    Synonyms: så at, således at
  4. that, why (introducing an independent clause, expressing passion, surprise, anger, or joy)
  5. (proscribed) added pleonastically to other conjunctions: fordi at, hvis at, når at
    • 2009, Frank Colding, Sejleren, p. 32 / https://books.google.dk/books?id=HCNperkZeKIC&pg=PA32:
      Forbavset aner min forstand, | at denne scenes sære magt | kun begribes, hvis at man | bevæger sig i dansetakt.
      Astonished, my mind senses that the strange power of this scene can only be understood if one moves in dance steps.

References[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse at, cognate with Swedish att, Norwegian å. Originally the same word as the preposition Old Norse at (at, to), from Proto-Germanic *at, cognate with English at. Doublet of ad). In the West Germanic languages, a different preposition, *tō (to), serves as the infinitive marker, cf English to, German zu, Dutch te.

Pronunciation[edit]

Particle[edit]

at

  1. to (infinitive-marker, obligatory when the infinitive functions as noun phrase or an adverbial phrase, but omitted when it is governed by a modal verb)
    Det er menneskeligt at fejle.
    It is human to fail.
  2. introducing an adverb of direction after a phrase that normally governs an infinitive (which may be understood elliptically)
    • 1992, Thøger Birkeland, Bette Nielses krig:
      Mon de da ikke snart skulle til at hjemad!
      Aren't they going to go home soon!

References[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

at

  1. singular past indicative of eten
  2. first-, second- and third-person singular present indicative of atten
  3. imperative of atten

Eastern Durango Nahuatl[edit]

Noun[edit]

at

  1. water

Egyptian[edit]

Romanization[edit]

at

  1. Manuel de Codage transliteration of ꜥt.

Faroese[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse at.

Preposition[edit]

at

  1. (with dative) at, towards, to

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse at (that), from Proto-Germanic *þat (that). Cognate with Middle English at (that, conjunction and relative pronoun), Scots at (that, conjunction and relative pronoun). More at that.

Conjunction[edit]

at

  1. that

Etymology 3[edit]

From Old Norse at (at, to), from Proto-Germanic *at (at, to). More at at.

Particle[edit]

at

  1. to A particle used to mark the following verb as an infinitive.
    At lyfta.To lift

Friulian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin actus; cf. Italian atto.

Noun[edit]

at m (plural ats)

  1. act, action, deed

Related terms[edit]


German[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from English at.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

at n (strong, genitive at, plural ats)

  1. at, at-sign
    Synonyms: at-Zeichen, Klammeraffe

Etymology 2[edit]

Symbol[edit]

at

  1. (dated, physics) Symbol for technische Atmosphäre, a non-SI unit of pressure used until 1978.
    Coordinate terms: atü, Pascal

Further reading[edit]

  • at” in Duden online
  • at” in Duden online
  • at” in Digitales Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache

Gothic[edit]

Romanization[edit]

at

  1. Romanization of 𐌰𐍄

Icelandic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

at n (genitive singular ats, nominative plural öt)

  1. fight

Declension[edit]


Irish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Irish att (swelling, protuberance, tumour).

Noun[edit]

at m (genitive singular as substantive ait, genitive as verbal noun ata, nominative plural atanna)

  1. swelling
    • 1899, Franz Nikolaus Finck, Die araner mundart[1], Marburg: N. G. Elwert'sche Verlagsbuchhandlung:
      at ə l̄āv m inīnə.
      conventional orthography: at i lámh m’iníne.
      My daughter has a swelling on her hand.
    • 1899, Franz Nikolaus Finck, Die araner mundart[2], Marburg: N. G. Elwert'sche Verlagsbuchhandlung:
      tā šȧxt n-at i n-ə wunāl.
      conventional orthography: Tá seacht n-at ina mhuineál.
      He has seven swellings on his neck.
    • 1899, Franz Nikolaus Finck, Die araner mundart[3], Marburg: N. G. Elwert'sche Verlagsbuchhandlung:
      kiŕ də lāv ə n̄-isḱə leš n̥ t-at ə wȳlū.
      conventional orthography: Cuir do lámh in uisce leis an t-at a maolú.
      Put your hand in water to reduce the swelling.
  2. verbal noun of at
Declension[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Irish attaid (swells, dilates, increases, verb), from att (swelling, protuberance, tumour).

Verb[edit]

at (present analytic atann, future analytic atfaidh, verbal noun at, past participle ata)

  1. (intransitive) swell
    • 1899, Franz Nikolaus Finck, Die araner mundart[4], Marburg: N. G. Elwert'sche Verlagsbuchhandlung:
      tā ə h-ēdn̥ atī.
      conventional orthography: Tá a héadan ataithe.
      Her face is swollen.
    • 1899, Franz Nikolaus Finck, Die araner mundart[5], Marburg: N. G. Elwert'sche Verlagsbuchhandlung:
      tā mə lāv atī.
      conventional orthography: Tá mo lámh ataithe.
      My hand is swollen.
    Synonym: borr
  2. (intransitive) bloat
  3. (intransitive, of sea) heave
Conjugation[edit]
  • Alternative past participle: ataithe

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Eclipsis with h-prothesis with t-prothesis
at n-at hat not applicable
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading[edit]


Ladin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin actus.

Noun[edit]

at m (plural ac)

  1. act
  2. action
  3. work

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Indo-European *h₂éti

Pronunciation[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

at

  1. but, yet
  2. whereas

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Livonian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Verb[edit]

at

  1. 3rd person plural present indicative form of vȱlda

Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old English æt, from Proto-Germanic *at, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂éd.

Alternative forms[edit]

Preposition[edit]

at

  1. at
Descendants[edit]
  • English: at
  • Scots: at
  • Yola: adh, ad, at
References[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse at.

Particle[edit]

at

  1. (Northern, northern East Midlands) to (infinitive-marker)
References[edit]

Min Nan[edit]

For pronunciation and definitions of at – see (“to snap something off; to break something; etc.”).
(This character, at, is the Pe̍h-ōe-jī form of .)

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse at. Cognate with Danish at and Swedish att.

Pronunciation[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

at

  1. that

References[edit]

“at” in The Bokmål Dictionary.


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse at. Cognate with Danish at and Swedish att.

Pronunciation[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

at

  1. that

References[edit]

“at” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.


Old Irish[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • it (second-person singular)
  • ata (third-person plural relative)

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (second-person singular): IPA(key): /at/
  • (third-person plural relative): IPA(key): /ad/

Verb[edit]

at

  1. inflection of is:
    1. second-person singular present indicative
    2. third-person plural present indicative relative

Old Norse[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *atǭ. Related to Old English etja.

Noun[edit]

at n (genitive ats, plural ǫt)

  1. conflict, fight, battle
Declension[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • Icelandic: at

Etymology 2[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *þat (that). Cognate with Old English þæt, Gothic 𐌸𐌰𐍄𐌰 (þata).

Conjunction[edit]

at

  1. that
  2. since, because, as
Descendants[edit]
  • Icelandic:
  • Faroese: at
  • Swedish: att
  • Danish: at

Etymology 3[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *at (at, to). Cognate with Old English æt, Old Frisian et, Old Saxon at, Old High German az, Gothic 𐌰𐍄 (at).

Particle[edit]

at

  1. to (infinitive particle)
Descendants[edit]
  • Icelandic:
  • Faroese: at
  • Norwegian:
    • Norwegian Bokmål: å
    • Norwegian Nynorsk: å
  • Swedish: att
  • Danish: at

Preposition[edit]

at

  1. at, to
Descendants[edit]
  • Icelandic:
  • Faroese: at
  • Norwegian Bokmål: åt
  • Old Swedish: at, āt
  • Old Danish: at
    • Danish: ad
      • Norwegian Bokmål: ad

References[edit]


Pipil[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Nahuan *aatl, from Proto-Uto-Aztecan *pa-ta. Compare Classical Nahuatl ātl (water)

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

at (plural ahat)

  1. water
    Xiconi chopi at
    Drink some water
  2. rain
    Axcan huetzi at
    Today it's raining
  3. river
    Nemi ne tacat itempan ne at
    The man is on the riverbank

Derived terms[edit]

  • -ayo (soup, broth; juice; liquid)

Pnar[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Khasian *ʔa:t, from Proto-Mon-Khmer *as ~ ʔəs. Cognate with Khasi at, Riang [Sak] ʔas¹, Nyaheun ʔaːjh, Pacoh ayh, Semai as.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

at

  1. to swell

Pochutec[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Nahuan *aatl, from Proto-Uto-Aztecan *pa-ta.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

at

  1. water

References[edit]


Scots[edit]

Preposition[edit]

at

  1. at

Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Irish att.

Noun[edit]

at m

  1. swelling, tumour
  2. protuberance, prominence
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Irish attaid (swells, dilates, increases, verb), from att (swelling, protuberance, tumour).

Verb[edit]

at (past dh'at, future ataidh, verbal noun at or atadh, past participle athte)

  1. swell, fester, puff up, become tumid
  2. swell, as in the sea

Mutation[edit]

Scottish Gaelic mutation
Radical Eclipsis with h-prothesis with t-prothesis
at n-at h-at t-at
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading[edit]


Selaru[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Central-Eastern Malayo-Polynesian *əpat, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *əpat, from Proto-Austronesian *Səpat.

Numeral[edit]

at

  1. four

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Ottoman Turkish آت(at).

Noun[edit]

at m (Cyrillic spelling ат)

  1. steed
  2. Arabian (horse)

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Simeulue[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *əpat, from Proto-Austronesian *Səpat.

Numeral[edit]

at

  1. four

Tagalog[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • 't (enclitic, after words ending with vowel)

Pronunciation[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

at

  1. and
    Synonym: saka

Derived terms[edit]


Tlingit[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

IPA(key): [ʔʌ̀tʰ]

Pronoun[edit]

at

  1. fourth-person non-human object pronoun (roughly equivalent to "something")
  2. fourth-person non-human possessive pronoun (roughly equivalent to "something's")

Derived terms[edit]


Tocharian B[edit]

Etymology[edit]

An apocopated form of ate (id)

Adverb[edit]

at

  1. away

Further reading[edit]

  • Adams, Douglas Q. (2013), “at”, in A Dictionary of Tocharian B: Revised and Greatly Enlarged (Leiden Studies in Indo-European; 10), Amsterdam, New York: Rodopi, →ISBN, page 9

Torres Strait Creole[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English heart.

Noun[edit]

at

  1. heart

Turkish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Ottoman Turkish آت(at, horse), from Proto-Turkic *at, *ăt (horse). Cognate with Karakhanid اَتْ(at, horse), Old Turkic 𐱃( /at/, horse).

Noun[edit]

at (definite accusative atı, plural atlar)

  1. (zoology) horse
  2. (chess) knight
Declension[edit]
Inflection
Nominative at
Definite accusative atı
Singular Plural
Nominative at atlar
Definite accusative atı atları
Dative ata atlara
Locative atta atlarda
Ablative attan atlardan
Genitive atın atların
Possessive forms
Nominative
Singular Plural
1st singular atım atlarım
2nd singular atın atların
3rd singular atı atları
1st plural atımız atlarımız
2nd plural atınız atlarınız
3rd plural atları atları
Definite accusative
Singular Plural
1st singular atımı atlarımı
2nd singular atını atlarını
3rd singular atını atlarını
1st plural atımızı atlarımızı
2nd plural atınızı atlarınızı
3rd plural atlarını atlarını
Dative
Singular Plural
1st singular atıma atlarıma
2nd singular atına atlarına
3rd singular atına atlarına
1st plural atımıza atlarımıza
2nd plural atınıza atlarınıza
3rd plural atlarına atlarına
Locative
Singular Plural
1st singular atımda atlarımda
2nd singular atında atlarında
3rd singular atında atlarında
1st plural atımızda atlarımızda
2nd plural atınızda atlarınızda
3rd plural atlarında atlarında
Ablative
Singular Plural
1st singular atımdan atlarımdan
2nd singular atından atlarından
3rd singular atından atlarından
1st plural atımızdan atlarımızdan
2nd plural atınızdan atlarınızdan
3rd plural atlarından atlarından
Genitive
Singular Plural
1st singular atımın atlarımın
2nd singular atının atlarının
3rd singular atının atlarının
1st plural atımızın atlarımızın
2nd plural atınızın atlarınızın
3rd plural atlarının atlarının
Predicative forms
Singular Plural
1st singular atım atlarım
2nd singular atsın atlarsın
3rd singular at
attır
atlar
atlardır
1st plural atız atlarız
2nd plural atsınız atlarsınız
3rd plural atlar atlardır
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

at

  1. second-person singular imperative of atmak

Further reading[edit]

  • at in Turkish dictionaries at Türk Dil Kurumu

Turkmen[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Turkic *at, *ăt (horse).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

at (definite accusative ady, plural atlar)

  1. horse
Declension[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Proto-Turkic *āt (name). Cognate with Old Turkic 𐰀𐱃(āt, name), Chuvash ят (jat, name), Turkish ad.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

at (definite accusative ady, plural atlar)

  1. name
Declension[edit]

Volapük[edit]

Determiner[edit]

at

  1. (demonstrative) this

Wakhi[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Cognate with Yagnobi ашт (ašt).

Numeral[edit]

at

  1. eight

Welsh[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Variant of Old Welsh ad (alongside the now-obsolete add), from Proto-Celtic *ad, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂éd.

Pronunciation[edit]

Preposition[edit]

at (triggers soft mutation)

  1. to, towards
  2. for
  3. at
  4. by

Inflection[edit]


West Frisian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

at

  1. if
    Synonym: as

Further reading[edit]

  • at”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011

West Makian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

at

  1. man
  2. male
  3. husband

References[edit]

  • Clemens Voorhoeve (1982) The Makian languages and their neighbours[7], Pacific linguistics

Wolof[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

at (definite form at mi)

  1. year

Yola[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English that, from Old English þæt, from Proto-Germanic *þat.

Alternative forms[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

at

  1. that, which

Determiner[edit]

at

  1. that

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English eten, from Old English etan, from Proto-West Germanic *etan.

Alternative forms[edit]

Verb[edit]

at (second-person singular eighthest, present participle atheen)

  1. to eat, ate
    • 1867, GLOSSARY OF THE DIALECT OF FORTH AND BARGY:
      Ich at mee dhree meales.
      I ate my three meals.

Etymology 3[edit]

Preposition[edit]

at

  1. Alternative form of adh
    • 1927, “ZONG OF TWI MAARKEET MOANS”, in THE ANCIENT DIALECT OF THE BARONIES OF FORTH AND BARGY, COUNTY WEXFORD, line 2:
      At high Thurns.
      At the high towers.

References[edit]

  • Jacob Poole (1867), William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith, page 23
  • Kathleen A. Browne (1927) The Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland Sixth Series, Vol.17 No.2, Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland, page 129