athair

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See also: Athair

Irish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Irish athair, from Proto-Celtic *ɸatīr, from Proto-Indo-European *ph₂tḗr.[3]

Noun[edit]

athair m (genitive singular athar, nominative plural aithreacha)

  1. father (male parent; term of address for a priest; male ancestor more remote than a parent, a progenitor)
    Fuair m’athair bás.
    My father died.
    • 1899, Franz Nikolaus Finck, Die araner mundart, volume II (overall work in German), Marburg: Elwert’sche Verlagsbuchhandlung, page 21:
      ḱē n xȳ ə wil tū, ə æhŕ̥?
      [Cén chaoi a bhfuil tú, a athair?]
      How are you, father? [could be addressed to one’s own father or to a priest, as in English]
    • 1899, Franz Nikolaus Finck, Die araner mundart, volume II (overall work in German), Marburg: Elwert’sche Verlagsbuchhandlung, page 22:
      æhŕəxə
      [m’aithreacha]
      my fathers, my ancestors
    • 1899, Franz Nikolaus Finck, Die araner mundart, volume II (overall work in German), Marburg: Elwert’sche Verlagsbuchhandlung, page 22:
      h-æhŕəxə n̄ȳfe[4]
      [na haithreacha naofa]
      the Church Fathers
  2. ancestor
  3. sire
Declension[edit]
Coordinate terms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun[edit]

athair f (genitive singular athrach)

  1. creeper
  2. Alternative form of nathair (snake)
Declension[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Eclipsis with h-prothesis with t-prothesis
athair n-athair hathair t-athair
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Sjoestedt, M. L. (1931) Phonétique d’un parler irlandais de Kerry (in French), Paris: Librairie Ernest Leroux, page 14
  2. ^ Quiggin, E. C. (1906) A Dialect of Donegal, Cambridge University Press, page 33
  3. ^ G. Toner, M. Ní Mhaonaigh, S. Arbuthnot, D. Wodtko, M.-L. Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “1 athair”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language
  4. ^ Corrected by the author on p. 257 to nȳfə

Further reading[edit]

Old Irish[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Celtic *ɸatīr, from Proto-Indo-European *ph₂tḗr.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

athair m (genitive athar, nominative plural aithir)

  1. father

Inflection[edit]

Masculine r-stem
Singular Dual Plural
Nominative athair athairL aithir
Vocative athair athairL aithrea
Accusative athairN athairL aithrea
Genitive athar athar aithreN, athraeN
Dative athairL aithrib, athraib aithrib, athraib
Initial mutations of a following adjective:
  • H = triggers aspiration
  • L = triggers lenition
  • N = triggers nasalization

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Irish: athair
  • Manx: ayr
  • Scottish Gaelic: athair

Mutation[edit]

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
athair unchanged n-athair
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading[edit]

Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish athair, from Proto-Celtic *ɸatīr, from Proto-Indo-European *ph₂tḗr.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

athair m (genitive singular athar, plural athraichean)

  1. father

Declension[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Scottish Gaelic mutation
Radical Eclipsis with h-prothesis with t-prothesis
athair n-athair h-athair t-athair
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading[edit]