aurum

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See also: Aurum

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin aurum (gold). Doublet of or.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

aurum (uncountable)

  1. (chemistry) gold, used in the names of various substances (see Derived terms)
  2. An Italian liqueur

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Malay: aurum

Latin[edit]

Latin Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia la

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Rhoticization of earlier ausum, from Proto-Italic *auzom, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂é-h₂us-óm (gold), from *h₂ews- (to dawn, become light, become red). Cognate with Lithuanian áuksas, Old Lithuanian ausas, Old Prussian ausis, Tocharian A wäs, Tocharian B yasā.[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

aurum n (genitive aurī); second declension

  1. gold (as mineral or metal)
  2. gold (colour)
  3. any object made of gold, such as a gold coin or a gold ring
  4. lustre
  5. a Golden Age

Declension[edit]

Second-declension noun (neuter).

Case Singular
Nominative aurum
Genitive aurī
Dative aurō
Accusative aurum
Ablative aurō
Vocative aurum

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Balkan-Romance:
  • Dalmatian:
  • Italo-Romance:
  • Padanian:
  • Gallo-Romance:
    • Occitan: aur
    • Old Catalan: or, aur
      • Catalan: or
    • Old French: or
      • Middle French: or, aur
        • French: or
          • Haitian Creole:
        • English: or
      • Walloon: ôr
  • Ibero-Romance:
  • Ancient borrowings:
    • Albanian: ar
    • Old Irish: ór (see there for further descendants)
    • Proto-Brythonic: *awr (see there for further descendants)
  • Learned borrowings:

References[edit]

  • De Vaan, Michiel (2008) Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 7), Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN, page 63

Further reading[edit]

  • aurum”, in Charlton T[homas] Lewis; Charles [Lancaster] Short (1879) [] A New Latin Dictionary [], New York, N.Y.; Cincinnati, Ohio; Chicago, Ill.: American Book Company; Oxford: Clarendon Press.
  • aurum”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • aurum in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • aurum in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • aurum”, in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • aurum”, in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin

Malay[edit]

Chemical element
Au
Previous: platinum (Pt)
Next: perak cergas (Hg)

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English aurum, from Latin aurum.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

aurum (Jawi spelling اٴوروم‎, informal 1st possessive aurumku, 2nd possessive aurummu, 3rd possessive aurumnya)

  1. gold (element)

Synonyms[edit]


Old Norse[edit]

Etymology[edit]

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Noun[edit]

aurum

  1. dative plural of eyrir