barrer

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English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology 1[edit]

bar +‎ -er

Noun[edit]

barrer (plural barrers)

  1. One who or that which bars.
    • 1976, Imre Lakatos, John Worrall, Elie Zahar, Proofs and Refutations: The Logic of Mathematical Discovery
      The worst merely bars some exceptions without looking at the proof at all. Hence the mystification when we have the proof on the one hand and the exceptions on the other. In the mind of such primitive exception-barrers, the proof and the exceptions exist in two completely separate compartments.

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

barrer (plural barrers)

  1. A non-SI unit of gas permeability.

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

barre +‎ -er

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ba.ʁe/, /bɑ.ʁe/
  • (file)

Verb[edit]

barrer

  1. to bar, bar up (to lock or bolt with a bar)
  2. to bar off
  3. to cross out, strike out (put written lines through written text, to show it is erroneous)
  4. (takes a reflexive pronoun, colloquial) to do one, to clear off; to leave
    Synonyms: se casser, se tirer
  5. (Canada, Louisiana) to lock, as in a door, not necessarily with a bar.

Conjugation[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Ladino[edit]

Verb[edit]

barrer (Latin spelling)

  1. to sweep

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Noun[edit]

barrer m

  1. indefinite plural of barre

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Inherited from Latin verrere. Cognate with Portuguese varrer and Galician varrer.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /baˈreɾ/, [baˈreɾ]

Verb[edit]

barrer (first-person singular present barro, first-person singular preterite barrí, past participle barrido)

  1. (transitive) to sweep

Conjugation[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Papiamentu: bari

Further reading[edit]