base

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See also: Base, BASE, basé, and Báse

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English base, bas, baas, from Old French base, from Latin basis, from Ancient Greek βάσις (básis). Doublet of basis.

Noun[edit]

base (plural bases)

  1. Something from which other things extend; a foundation.
    1. A supporting, lower or bottom component of a structure or object.
      • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 14, in The China Governess[1]:
        Nanny Broome was looking up at the outer wall. Just under the ceiling there were three lunette windows, heavily barred and blacked out in the normal way by centuries of grime. Their bases were on a level with the pavement outside, a narrow way which was several feet lower than the road behind the house.
  2. The starting point of a logical deduction or thought; basis.
  3. A permanent structure for housing military personnel and material.
  4. The place where decisions for an organization are made; headquarters.
  5. (cooking, painting, pharmacy) A basic but essential component or ingredient.
  6. A substance used as a mordant in dyeing[1].
  7. (cosmetics) Foundation: a cosmetic cream to make the face appear uniform.
  8. (chemistry) Any of a class of generally water-soluble compounds, having bitter taste, that turn red litmus blue, and react with acids to form salts.
  9. Important areas in games and sports.
    1. A safe zone in the children's games of tag and hide-and-go-seek.
    2. (baseball) One of the four places that a runner can stand without being subject to being tagged out when the ball is in play.
  10. (architecture) The lowermost part of a column, between the shaft and the pedestal or pavement.
  11. (biology, biochemistry) A nucleotide's nucleobase in the context of a DNA or RNA biopolymer.
  12. (botany) The end of a leaf, petal or similar organ where it is attached to its support.
  13. (electronics) The name of the controlling terminal of a bipolar transistor (BJT).
  14. (geometry) The lowest side of a triangle or other polygon, or the lowest face of a cone, pyramid or other polyhedron laid flat.
  15. (heraldry) The lowest third of a shield or escutcheon.
  16. (heraldry) The lower part of the field. See escutcheon.
  17. (mathematics) A number raised to the power of an exponent.
    The logarithm to base 2 of 8 is 3.
  18. (mathematics) Synonym of radix.
  19. (topology) The set of sets from which a topology is generated.
  20. (topology) A topological space, looked at in relation to one of its covering spaces, fibrations, or bundles.
  21. (group theory) A sequence of elements not jointly stabilized by any nontrivial group element.
  22. (acrobatics, cheerleading) In hand-to-hand balance, the person who supports the flyer; the person that remains in contact with the ground.
  23. (linguistics) A morpheme (or morphemes) that serves as a basic foundation on which affixes can be attached.
  24. (music) Dated form of bass.
  25. (military, historical) The smallest kind of cannon.
  26. (archaic) The housing of a horse.
  27. (historical, sometimes in the plural) A kind of skirt (often of velvet or brocade, but sometimes of mail or other armour) which hung from the middle to about the knees, or lower.
    Coordinate term: lamboys
    • 1977, Armours of Henry VIII:
      The base (skirt), as opposed to the practical skirt of the tonlet armour, is an affectation in imitation of the civilian fabric garment of the period and may well have been inspired by a similar feature on Maximilian's gift armour.
    • 2007, AHRC Research Centre for Textile Conservation and Textile Studies. Conference, Textiles and Text: Re-establishing the Links Between Archival and Object-based Research : Postprints, pages 47-49:
      Both knee-length bases are made from black velvet [...] There was a second type of metal skirt that could be worn with armour: the tonlet. [...] Unlike the base, however, the tonlet did not have a textile counterpart. [...]
  28. (obsolete) The lower part of a robe or petticoat.
  29. (obsolete) An apron.
    • 1613, John Marston, The Insatiate Countess
      bakers in their linen bases
  30. A line in a survey which, being accurately determined in length and position, serves as the origin from which to compute the distances and positions of any points or objects connected with it by a system of triangles.
  31. (politics) A group of voters who almost always support a single party's candidates for elected office.
    Synonyms: electoral base, political base
  32. (Marxism) The forces and relations of production that produce the necessities and amenities of life.
    Synonym: substructure
    Antonym: superstructure
  33. A material that holds paint or other materials together; a binder.
  34. (aviation) Short for base leg.
  35. (slang) freebase cocaine
    • 2019 January 20, Ann Cleeves,Paul Matthew Thompson; Lawrence Gough, director, chapter 2, in Vera(Cuckoo) (9), spoken by Tyler Lennon (Louis Healy), 1:26:51 from the start:
      TYLER LENNON(played by Louis Healy): Ten grand a week we were clearing: base, white, meth, weed, anything. I can get you anything to get you high.
Synonyms[edit]
  • (chemical compound that will neutralize an acid): alkali
Antonyms[edit]
  • (chemical compound that will neutralize an alkali): acid
  • (end of a leaf): apex
Hyponyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.
See also[edit]

Other terms used in arithmetic operations:

Advanced hyperoperations: tetration, pentation, hexation

Verb[edit]

base (third-person singular simple present bases, present participle basing, simple past and past participle based)

  1. (transitive) To give as its foundation or starting point; to lay the foundation of.
    • 1992, Rudolf M[athias] Schuster, The Hepaticae and Anthocerotae of North America: East of the Hundredth Meridian, volume V, New York, N.Y.: Columbia University Press, →ISBN, page vii:
      Firstly, I continue to base most species treatments on personally collected material, rather than on herbarium plants.
  2. (transitive) To be located (at a particular place).
  3. (acrobatics, cheerleading) To act as a base; to be the person supporting the flyer.
    • 2005, John T. Warren; Laura B. Lengel, Casting Gender: Women and Performance in Intercultural Context, →ISBN, page 73:
      Apart from time taken out during radio- and chemotherapy, Maurs continued to participate in POW. She would base a flyer in a double balance and make the audience laugh with her clowning antics for two more shows.
  4. (slang) To freebase.
    • 1984, “8 Million Stories”, in Ego Trip, performed by Kurtis Blow ft. Run-DMC:
      You know he started to base at a hell of a pace / And now it's a disgrace, he's got the pipe in his face
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English base, bas, from Old French bas, from Late Latin bassus (low). Cognate with Spanish bajo, Italian basso and base.

Adjective[edit]

base (comparative baser or more base, superlative basest or most base)

  1. (obsolete) Low in height; short.
  2. Low in place or position.
  3. (obsolete) Of low value or degree.
  4. (archaic) Of low social standing or rank; vulgar, common.
    • c. 1587–1588, [Christopher Marlowe], Tamburlaine the Great. [] The First Part [], part 1, 2nd edition, London: [] [R. Robinson for] Richard Iones, [], published 1592, OCLC 932920499; reprinted as Tamburlaine the Great (A Scolar Press Facsimile), Menston, Yorkshire; London: Scolar Press, 1973, →ISBN, Act III, scene iii:
      UUhat meanes the mightie Turkiſh Emperor
      To talke with one ſo baſe as Tamburlaine?
    • c. 1603–1606, William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of King Lear”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies [] (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act I, scene ii], page 285, column 2:
      Wherefore should I / Stand in the plague of custome, and permit / The curiosity of Nations, to deprive me? For that I am some twelve, or fourteen Moonshines / Lag of a Brother? Why Bastard? Wherefore base? / When my Dimensions are as well compact, My minde as generous, and my shape as true / As honest madams issue? Why brand they us / With Base? With basenes Bastardie? Base, Base?
    • 1623, Francis Bacon, De Augmentis Scientiarum
      a peasant and base swain
  5. Morally reprehensible, immoral; cowardly.
  6. (now rare) Inferior; unworthy, of poor quality.
    • 1932, Aldous Huxley, Brave New World[3], Chatto & Windus:
      'Like this horrible film.'
      'Horrible?' Lenina was genuinely astonished. 'But I thought it was lovely.'
      'It was base,' he said indignantly, 'it was ignoble.'
  7. (of a metal) Not considered precious or noble.
  8. Alloyed with inferior metal; debased.
    base coin
    base bullion
  9. (obsolete) Of illegitimate birth; bastard.
  10. Not classical or correct.
  11. Obsolete form of bass.
    the base tone of a violin
  12. (law) Not held by honourable service.
    A base estate is one held by services not honourable, or held by villenage. Such a tenure is called base, or low, and the tenant is a base tenant.
Usage notes[edit]
  • Said of fellows, motives, occupations, etc.
Synonyms[edit]
Antonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Etymology 3[edit]

Probably a specific use of Etymology 1, above; perhaps also a development of the plural of bar.

Noun[edit]

base (uncountable)

  1. (now chiefly US, historical) The game of prisoners' bars. [from 15th c.]

Etymology 4[edit]

Variant forms.

Noun[edit]

base

  1. Alternative form of BASE
Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ 1839, Andrew Ure, A Dictionary of Arts, Manufactures, and Mines,

Anagrams[edit]


Afrikaans[edit]

Noun[edit]

base

  1. plural of baas

Asturian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin basis, from Ancient Greek βάσις (básis).

Noun[edit]

base f (plural bases)

  1. base

Related terms[edit]


Bambara[edit]

Noun[edit]

base

  1. a bush taxi, a common type of public transit
    Synonym: duurunin

Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin basis, from Ancient Greek βάσις (básis).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

base f (plural bases)

  1. base
  2. basis
  3. grounding
  4. foundation

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Czech[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

base

  1. dative singular of basa
  2. locative singular of basa
  3. vocative singular of bas
  4. locative singular of bas

Etymology 2[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

base f

  1. Obsolete form of báze.
Declension[edit]

Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French base, from Latin basis, from Ancient Greek βᾰ́σῐς (básis). Doublet of basis and also related distantly to komme.

Noun[edit]

base c (singular definite basen, plural indefinite baser)

  1. (chemistry) base (generally understood to be a Brønsted-Lowry base)
  2. (military) base
  3. headquarters

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Icelandic: basi m

Dutch[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • basis (obsolete in this sense)

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French base, from Latin basis. Doublet of basis. Also a distant doublet of komst, via Proto-Indo-European *gʷḿ̥tis.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

base f (plural basen, diminutive basetje n)

  1. (chemistry) base (class of compounds), alkali

Synonyms[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Indonesian: basa

References[edit]

  • base” in Woordenlijst Nederlandse Taal – Officiële Spelling, Nederlandse Taalunie. [the official spelling word list for the Dutch language]

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French base, from Latin basis, from Ancient Greek βάσις (básis).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

base f (plural bases)

  1. base (bottom part of something)
  2. base (safe place)
  3. base, basis (fundamental belief)
  4. (chemistry) base

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Crimean Tatar: baza
  • Czech: báze
  • Danish: base
    • Icelandic: basi m
  • Norwegian:
    • Norwegian Bokmål: base
    • Norwegian Nynorsk: base
  • Romanian: bază

Further reading[edit]


Galician[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin basis, from Ancient Greek βάσις (básis).

Noun[edit]

base f (plural bases)

  1. base

Related terms[edit]


Italian[edit]

Italian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia it

Etymology[edit]

From Latin basis, from Ancient Greek βάσις (básis).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈba.ze/
  • Rhymes: -aze
  • Hyphenation: bà‧se

Noun[edit]

base f (plural basi)

  1. base, alkaline
  2. basis
  3. (figuratively) mainstay

Antonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Latin[edit]

Noun[edit]

base

  1. ablative singular of basis

Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from Old French base, from Latin basis, from Ancient Greek βᾰ́σῐς (básis), from Proto-Indo-European *gʷémtis.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

base (plural bases)

  1. A foundation or base; the bottom of a building.
  2. The foundation, base, or bottom of a column, statue, or vase.
  3. (rare) Padding inserted below a horse's bridle.
  4. (rare) A hand's palm; the section of a hand below the fingers.
  5. (rare) The bottom portion of a dress.
  6. (rare, alchemy) The mix of metals used as a base for alchemical operations.
Descendants[edit]
References[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Adjective[edit]

base

  1. Alternative form of bas

Etymology 3[edit]

Noun[edit]

base

  1. Alternative form of bace

Moore[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

base

  1. to leave
  2. to cancel, stop, cease
  3. to abandon, throw away

Northern Sami[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (Kautokeino) IPA(key): /ˈpase/

Verb[edit]

base

  1. inflection of bassit:
    1. present indicative connegative
    2. second-person singular imperative
    3. imperative connegative

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Etymology[edit]

From English base, and French base (in chemistry). Ultimately from Latin basis and a doublet of basis.

Noun[edit]

base m (definite singular basen, indefinite plural baser, definite plural basene)

  1. (chemistry, military, general) a base

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

Etymology[edit]

From English base, and French base (in chemistry). Ultimately from Latin basis and a doublet of basis.

Noun[edit]

base m (definite singular basen, indefinite plural basar, definite plural basane)

  1. (chemistry, military, general) a base

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin basis, from Ancient Greek βάσις (básis).

Noun[edit]

base f (oblique plural bases, nominative singular base, nominative plural bases)

  1. base (bottom part; supporting part)

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • Godefroy, Frédéric, Dictionnaire de l'ancienne langue française et de tous ses dialectes du IXe au XVe siècle (1881) (base, supplement)

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin basis, from Ancient Greek βάσις (básis).

Pronunciation[edit]

 

Noun[edit]

base f (plural bases)

  1. basis
  2. base
  3. (chemistry) base
    Antonym: ácido
  4. groundwork

Rukai[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Japanese バス (basu).

Noun[edit]

base

  1. (vehicles) bus

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

base

  1. broth

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin basis, from Ancient Greek βάσις (básis).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈbase/ [ˈba.se]
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ase
  • Hyphenation: ba‧se

Noun[edit]

base f (plural bases)

  1. base
  2. basis
  3. (linear algebra) basis
  4. grounding
  5. (cosmetics) foundation
  6. (basketball) point guard
  7. (baseball) base

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

base

  1. inflection of basar:
    1. first/third-person singular present subjunctive
    2. third-person singular imperative

Further reading[edit]


Tagalog[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Spanish base (basis). The baseball definition is from English base, but pronounced the same as the Spanish word.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • Hyphenation: ba‧se
  • IPA(key): /ˈbase/, [ˈba.se]

Noun[edit]

base

  1. base; basis
    Synonyms: batayan, tuntunin, pamantayan
  2. (baseball) base

Derived terms[edit]


Venetian[edit]

Adjective[edit]

base f

  1. feminine plural of baso