basis

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See also: Basis

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin basis, from Ancient Greek βάσις(básis),[1] from Proto-Indo-European *gʷémtis, derived from Proto-Indo-European *gʷem- (English come).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

basis ‎(plural bases)

  1. A starting point, base or foundation for an argument or hypothesis.
  2. An underlying condition or circumstance.
    • 2013, Daniel Taylor, Danny Welbeck leads England's rout of Moldova but hit by Ukraine ban (in The Guardian, 6 September 2013)[1]
      Hodgson may now have to bring in James Milner on the left and, on that basis, a certain amount of gloss was taken off a night on which Welbeck scored twice but barely celebrated either before leaving the pitch angrily complaining to the Slovakian referee.
  3. A regular frequency.
    You should brush your teeth on a daily basis at minimum.
    The flights to Fiji leave on a weekly basis.
    Cars must be checked on a yearly basis.
  4. (linear algebra) In a vector space, a linearly independent set of vectors spanning the whole vector space.
  5. (accounting) Amount paid for an investment, including commissions and other expenses.
  6. (topology) A collection of subsets ("basis elements") of a set, such that this collection covers the set, and for any two basis elements which both contain an element of the set, there is a third basis element contained in the intersection of the first two, which also contains that element.
    The collection of all possible unions of basis elements of a basis is said to be the topology generated by that basis.

Usage notes[edit]

  • The construction "on a daily/weekly/etc. basis" is usually an unnecessarily-wordy substitute for simply "daily/weekly/etc."

Derived terms[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

  • (starting point for discussion): base

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

References[edit]

  1. 1.0 1.1 basis” listed in the Oxford English Dictionary [2nd Ed.; 1989]

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

Noun[edit]

basis f ‎(plural basissen or bases, diminutive basisje n)

  1. basis
  2. base

Derived terms[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Ancient Greek βάσις(básis, foundation, base).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

basis f ‎(genitive basis); third declension

  1. A pedestal, foot, base; basis, foundation.
  2. (architecture) The lowest part of the shaft of a column.
  3. (grammar) The primitive word, root.
  4. (of cattle) A track, footprint.

Inflection[edit]

Note that there are the alternative forms baseos for the genitive singular basis, baseī for the ablative singular, basin for accusative singular (botanical Latin), and baseis for the accusative plural. Third declension, alternative accusative singular in -im, alternative ablative singular in and accusative plural in -īs.

Case Singular Plural
nominative basis basēs
genitive basis basium
dative basī basibus
accusative basem
basim
basēs
basīs
ablative base
basī
basibus
vocative basis basēs

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Ancient Greek βάσις(básis)

Noun[edit]

basis m ‎(definite singular basisen, indefinite plural basiser, definite plural basisene)

  1. basis
  2. base

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Ancient Greek βάσις(básis)

Noun[edit]

basis m ‎(definite singular basisen, indefinite plural basisar, definite plural basisane)

  1. basis
  2. base

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]