basis

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See also: Basis

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin basis, from Ancient Greek βάσις (básis),[1] from Proto-Indo-European *gʷémtis, derived from Proto-Indo-European *gʷem- (whence also come). Doublet of base.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

basis (plural bases or (rare) baseis or (nonstandard) basises)

  1. A physical base or foundation.
    • 1695, William Congreve, To the King, on the taking of Namur, 1810, Samuel Johnson, Alexander Chalmers (biographies), The Works of the English Poets from Chaucer to Cowper, Volume 10, page 271,
      Beholding rocks from their firm basis rent;
      Mountain on mountain thrown,
      With threatening hurl, that shook th' aerial firmament!
  2. A starting point, base or foundation for an argument or hypothesis.
    • 2019, VOA Learning English (public domain)
      (file)
      I wonder if the South Korean side has any basis that its smog is from China.
  3. An underlying condition or circumstance.
    • 2013 September 7, Daniel Taylor, “Danny Welbeck leads England's rout of Moldova but hit by Ukraine ban”, in The Guardian[1]:
      Hodgson may now have to bring in James Milner on the left and, on that basis, a certain amount of gloss was taken off a night on which Welbeck scored twice but barely celebrated either before leaving the pitch angrily complaining to the Slovakian referee.
  4. A regular frequency.
    You should brush your teeth on a daily basis at minimum.
    The flights to Fiji leave on a weekly basis.
    Cars must be checked on a yearly basis.
  5. (agriculture, trading) The difference between the cash price a dealer pays to a farmer for his produce and an agreed reference price, which is usually the futures price at which the given crop is trading at a commodity exchange.
    Included in the basis could be elevation, cleaning, freight by truck and/or rail, government inspection fees, administration fees, interest and storage charges as well as allowance for risk and profit for the grain dealer.https://www.alberta.ca/wheat-basis-levels.aspx
  6. (linear algebra) In a vector space, a linearly independent set of vectors spanning the whole vector space.
  7. (accounting) Amount paid for an investment, including commissions and other expenses.
  8. (topology) A collection of subsets ("basis elements") of a set, such that this collection covers the set, and for any two basis elements which both contain an element of the set, there is a third basis element contained in the intersection of the first two, which also contains that element.
    The collection of all possible unions of basis elements of a basis is said to be the topology generated by that basis.

Synonyms[edit]

  • (starting point for discussion): base

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

References[edit]

  1. 1.0 1.1 basis” listed in the Oxford English Dictionary [2nd Ed.; 1989]

Anagrams[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Verb[edit]

basis

  1. second-person singular present subjunctive form of basar

Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin basis, from Ancient Greek βᾰ́σῐς (básis). Doublet of base, and also related to komme, from the same ultimate source.

Noun[edit]

basis

  1. (linear algebra) basis

Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin basis, from Ancient Greek βάσις (básis). Doublet of base. Also a distant doublet of komst, via Proto-Indo-European *gʷḿ̥tis.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈbaː.zəs/, /ˈbaː.zɪs/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: ba‧sis

Noun[edit]

basis f (plural basissen or bases, diminutive basisje n)

  1. basis (principle, foundation, that which is elementary)
  2. base (lower portion, foundation)
  3. Obsolete form of base (base, alkali).

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Indonesian: basis
  • Sranan Tongo: basis

Finnish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin basis.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈbɑsis/, [ˈbɑs̠is̠]
  • Rhymes: -ɑsis
  • Syllabification: ba‧sis

Noun[edit]

basis

  1. basis, base

Declension[edit]

Inflection of basis (Kotus type 39/vastaus, no gradation)
nominative basis basikset
genitive basiksen basisten
basiksien
partitive basista basiksia
illative basikseen basiksiin
singular plural
nominative basis basikset
accusative nom. basis basikset
gen. basiksen
genitive basiksen basisten
basiksien
partitive basista basiksia
inessive basiksessa basiksissa
elative basiksesta basiksista
illative basikseen basiksiin
adessive basiksella basiksilla
ablative basikselta basiksilta
allative basikselle basiksille
essive basiksena basiksina
translative basikseksi basiksiksi
instructive basiksin
abessive basiksetta basiksitta
comitative basiksineen
Possessive forms of basis (type vastaus)
possessor singular plural
1st person basikseni basiksemme
2nd person basiksesi basiksenne
3rd person basiksensa

Anagrams[edit]


Indonesian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch basis, from Latin basis, from Ancient Greek βάσις (básis). Doublet of basa.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [ˈbasɪs]
  • Hyphenation: ba‧sis

Noun[edit]

basis

  1. basis, base
  2. basis:
    1. (mathematics) in a vector space, a linearly independent set of vectors spanning the whole vector space.
  3. base:
    1. (electronics) the name of the controlling terminal of a bipolar transistor (BJT).
    2. (geometry) the lowest side of a in a triangle or other polygon, or the lowest face of a cone, pyramid or other polyhedron laid flat.
    3. (military) headquarter: permanent structure for housing military.

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Ancient Greek βᾰ́σῐς (básis, stepping, step; foot; base, pedestal).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

basis f (genitive basis); third declension

  1. (literally) a pedestal, foot, base
    Synonyms: fundāmentum, fundāmen, crepīdō
    • aliquem cum basī suā mētīrī
      to give false measure, to estimate too high
      (literally, “to measure a pillar together with its pedestal”)
    • 70 BC, Cicero, In Verrem[2], volume 2.2, archived from the original on 2022-02-03, 154:
      ... huic etiam Romae videmus in basi statuarum maximis litteris incisum, A COMMVNI SICILIAE DATAS.
      ... we see in his honor, even in Rome, GIVEN BY THE COMMUNITY OF SICILY carved on the base of statues in huge letters.
    1. (figuratively) a foundation
      Synonym: rādīx
      • circa 400, Ben Sira, translated by Eusebius Sophronius Hieronymus, Vulgate[3], archived from the original on 2021-07-11, Sirach 6.30:
        ... et erunt tibi conpedes in protectionem fortitudinis et bases virtutis et torques illius in stolam gloriae ...
        ... and its [wisdom's] fetters will become a strong protection and the foundations of virtue for you, and its chain will become a glorious robe ...
  2. (geometry) the base of a triangle, chord of an arc
    • 45 BC, Cicero, De Natura Deorum, volume 2, 125:
      Illud vero (ab Aristotele animadversum, a quo pleraque) quis potest non mirari: grues cum loca calidiora petentes maria transmittant, trianguli efficere formam; eius autem summo angulo aer ab is adversus pellitur, deinde sensim ab utroque latere, tamquam remis, ita pinnis cursus avium levatur; basis autem trianguli, quam efficiunt grues, ea tamquam a puppi ventis adiuvatur; eaeque in tergo praevolantium colla et capita reponunt; quod quia ipse dux facere non potest, quia non habet, ubi nitatur, revolat, ut ipse quoque quiescat; in eius locum succedit ex his, quae adquierunt, eaque vicissitudo in omni cursu conservatur.
      Really, who can not be surprised by this (noticed by Aristotle, from whom comes most of this): that cranes, when they cross the seas looking for warmer places, make the shape of a triangle; for the air is pushed away from them by the top angle, then gradually on each side, as by oars, so the birds' course is elevated by the wings; as for the base of the triangle that cranes make, it is helped as though by winds from the stern; and they put their necks and heads in the back of those flying before them; because the leader itself cannot do this, because it doesn't have one, when it strains itself, it flies back, so that it can also rest; one of those which were resting behind it takes its place, and this changing of places is kept up for the whole journey.
  3. (architecture) the lowest part of the shaft of a column
  4. (grammar) a primitive word, root
  5. (of cattle) a track, footprint
    Synonym: vestīgium
Quote-alpha.png This entry needs quotations to illustrate usage. If you come across any interesting, durably archived quotes then please add them!

Inflection[edit]

Note that alternative forms exist for some cases:

Third-declension noun (i-stem, accusative singular in -im, ablative singular in ).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative basis basēs
Genitive basis basium
Dative basī basibus
Accusative basim basēs
basīs
Ablative basī basibus
Vocative basis basēs

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Ancient Greek βάσις (básis) via Latin basis, whence also the doublet base.

Noun[edit]

basis m (definite singular basisen, indefinite plural basiser, definite plural basisene)

  1. basis
  2. base

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Ancient Greek βάσις (básis) via Latin basis, whence also the doublet base.

Noun[edit]

basis m (definite singular basisen, indefinite plural basisar, definite plural basisane)

  1. basis
  2. base

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]