bastard

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See also: Bastard

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English bastard, bastarde, from Anglo-Norman bastard (illegitimate child), from Frankish *bāst (marriage) (probably via Medieval Latin bastardus; compare Middle Dutch bast (lust, heat)) and derogatory suffix -ard (pejorative agent noun suffix), from Proto-Germanic *banstuz (bond, tie) (compare West Frisian boask, boaste (marriage)), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰendʰ- (to tie, bind); or equivalent to bast +‎ -ard. Cognate with French bâtard (bastard), West Frisian bastert (bastard), Dutch bastaard (bastard), German Bastard (bastard), Icelandic bastarður (bastard). Probably originally referred to a child from a polygynous marriage of heathen Germanic custom — a practice not sanctioned by the Christian churches. Related to boose.

Alternatively, the Old French form may originate from the term fils de bast (packsaddle son), meaning a child conceived on an improvised bed (medieval saddles often doubled as beds while traveling).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bastard (plural bastards)

  1. A person who was born out of wedlock, and hence often considered an illegitimate descendant.
    Synonyms: love child, born in the vestry, illegitimate; see also Thesaurus:bastard
    • 1965, The Big Valley
      Jarrod: Who are you?
      Heath: Your father's bastard son.
  2. A mongrel (biological cross between different breeds, groups or varieties).
  3. (vulgar, offensive or derogatory, sometimes referring specifically to a man) A contemptible, inconsiderate, overly or arrogantly rude or spiteful person.
    Synonyms: son of a bitch, arsehole, asshole; see also Thesaurus:git, Thesaurus:jerk
    Some bastard stole my car while I was helping an injured person.
    • 1997, South Park television program
      "Oh my God, they killed Kenny!" "You bastards!"
  4. (often humorous) A man, a fellow, a male friend.
    lucky bastard
    poor bastard
    Get over here, you old bastard!
  5. (often preceded by 'poor') A person deserving of pity.
    Poor bastard, I feel so sorry for him.
    These poor bastards started out life probably in bad or broken homes.
  6. (informal) A child who does not know their father.
  7. (informal) Something extremely difficult or unpleasant to deal with.
    Life can be a real bastard.
  8. A variation that is not genuine; something irregular or inferior or of dubious origin, fake or counterfeit.
    The architecture was a kind of bastard, suggesting Gothic but not being true Gothic.
    • 1622, Francis Bacon, Bacon's History of the Reign of King Henry VII, Cambridge University Press (1902), page 62:
      There were also made good and politic laws that parliament, against usury, which is the bastard use of money...
  9. A bastard file.
  10. A sweet wine.
  11. A sword that is midway in length between a short-sword and a long sword; also bastard sword.
  12. An inferior quality of soft brown sugar, obtained from syrups that have been boiled several times.
  13. A large mould for straining sugar.
  14. A writing paper of a particular size.

Usage notes[edit]

  • (one born to unmarried parents): Not always regarded as a stigma (though it is one in e.g. canon law, prohibitive for clerical office without papal indult): Norman duke William, the Conqueror of England, is referred to in state documents as "William the Bastard"; a Burgundian prince was even officially styled Great Bastard of Burgundy.

Antonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Adjective[edit]

bastard (comparative more bastard, superlative most bastard)

  1. Of or like a bastard (illegitimate human descendant).
  2. Of or like a bastard (bad person).
  3. Of or like a mongrel, bastardized creature/cross.
  4. Of abnormal, irregular or otherwise inferior qualities (size, shape etc).
    a bastard musket
    a bastard culverin
    1. Spurious, lacking authenticity: counterfeit, fake.
      • a. 1677, Isaac Barrow, Of Self-conceit (sermon):
        that bastard self-love which is so vicious in itself, and productive of so many vices
    2. (Should we delete(+) this sense?) (of a language) imperfect; not spoken or written well or in the classical style; broken.
      • 1887, H. Rider Haggard, She: A History of Adventure[1]:
        Of what race could these people be? Their language was a bastard Arabic, and yet they were not Arabs; I was quite sure of that.
  5. Used in the vernacular name of a species to indicate that it is similar in some way to another species, often (but not always) one of another genus.
  6. (UK, vulgar) Very unpleasant.
    I've got a bastard headache.
  7. (printing) Abbreviated, as the half title in a page preceding the full title page of a book.
  8. (theater lighting) Consisting of one predominant color blended with small amounts of complementary color; used to replicate natural light because of their warmer appearance.
    A bastard orange gel produces predominantly orange light with undertones of blue.

Translations[edit]

Interjection[edit]

bastard!

  1. (rare) Exclamation of strong dismay or strong sense of being upset.
    • 2001, Stephen King, “The Death of Jack Hamilton”, in Everything's Eventual, Simon and Schuster (2007), →ISBN, page 90:
      Jack says, “Oh! Bastard! I’m hit!” That bullet had to have come in the busted back window and how it missed Johnnie to hit Jack I don’t know.
    • 2004, Cecelia Ahern, PS, I Love You (novel), Hyperion, →ISBN, page 7:
      “Yes, I’m hhhhowwwwwwcch!” she yelped as she stubbed her toe against the bedpost. “Shit, shit, fuck, bastard, shit, crap!”
    • 2006, Emily Franklin, Love from London, Penguin, →ISBN, page 212:
      “Isn’t she lovely?” Clem asks, hopefully rhetorically. “Oh, bastard. I’ve got to go—that’s my signal. []

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Verb[edit]

bastard (third-person singular simple present bastards, present participle bastarding, simple past and past participle bastarded)

  1. (obsolete) To bastardize.

Further reading[edit]

References[edit]


Anagrams[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Occitan bastard.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

bastard (feminine bastarda, masculine plural bastards, feminine plural bastardes)

  1. illegitimate (born out of wedlock)
  2. adulterated

Derived terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

bastard m (plural bastards, feminine bastarda)

  1. bastard (child born out of wedlock)

Further reading[edit]


Czech[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [ˈbastart]
  • Hyphenation: ba‧s‧tard

Noun[edit]

bastard m anim

  1. bastard, love child (person born to unmarried parents)
    Synonym: levoboček
  2. bastard, mongrel (biological cross between different breeds, groups or varieties)
  3. bastard, asshole

Declension[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • bastard in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • bastard in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French bastard.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /bastard/, [b̥aˈsd̥ɑːˀd̥]
  • IPA(key): /bastar/, [b̥aˈsd̥ɑːˀ]

Noun[edit]

bastard c (singular definite bastarden, plural indefinite bastarder)

  1. crossbreed (an organism produced by mating of individuals of different varieties or breeds)
    Synonyms: hybrid, krydsning
  2. mongrel (someone of mixed kind or uncertain origin, especially a dog)
  3. (dated) bastard (person who was born out of wedlock)

Inflection[edit]


Irish[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Middle English bastard, from Old French bastard.

Noun[edit]

bastard m (genitive singular bastaird, nominative plural bastaird)

  1. bastard

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
bastard bhastard mbastard
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Anglo-Norman bastard; equivalent to bast (illegitimacy) +‎ -ard.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈbastard/, /ˈbastaːrd/, /ˈbastərd/

Noun[edit]

bastard (plural bastardes)

  1. an illegitimate child, especially a noble one; a bastard
  2. a kind of fortified wine, often with spices added
  3. (rare) a heretic or sinner; one separated from one's deity
  4. (rare) a dog that isn't purebred; a mutt or mongrel
  5. (rare) a botanical tendril or offshoot

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • English: bastard
  • Scots: bastart, bastert

References[edit]

Adjective[edit]

bastard

  1. coming not from wedlock, coming from bastardy; illegitimate
  2. low-quality, inferior, imitation; of bad manufacture
  3. (rare) not purebred; of mixed lineage
  4. (rare) made using or incorporating fortified wine
  5. (rare) wrong, erroneous, incorrect

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]


Middle French[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French bastard, from Late Latin bastardus.

Noun[edit]

bastard m (plural bastars, feminine singular bastarde, feminine plural bastardes)

  1. bastard (child born outside of wedlock)

Adjective[edit]

bastard m (feminine singular bastarde, masculine plural bastars, feminine plural bastardes)

  1. bastard

Descendants[edit]


Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Late Latin bastardus, of Germanic origin, possibly Frankish.

Noun[edit]

bastard m (oblique plural bastarz or bastartz, nominative singular bastarz or bastartz, nominative plural bastard)

  1. bastard (person conceived to unmarried parents)
    • 12th Century, Unknown, Raoul de Cambrai:
      Vos savez bien qe je sui de bas lin, [e]t sui bastars
      You know well that I am of low birth, and I am a bastard
  2. (derogatory, usually vocative) bastard (insult)

Adjective[edit]

bastard m (oblique and nominative feminine singular bastarde)

  1. bastard (conceived by unmarried parents)

Declension[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Polish[edit]

Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from German Bastard or Italian bastardo, from Late Latin bastardus, from Frankish, possibly through Old French bastardus.[1][2]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bastard m pers

  1. (literary) bastard (a person who was born out of wedlock, and hence often considered an illegitimate descendant)
    Synonym: bękart

Declension[edit]

Noun[edit]

bastard m anim

  1. bastard, mongrel (biological cross between different breeds, groups or varieties)
    Synonyms: hybryda, krzyżówka, mieszaniec

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

adjective
noun

References[edit]

  1. ^ Mirosław Bańko; Lidia Wiśniakowska (2021) Wielki słownik wyrazów obcych, →ISBN
  2. ^ bastard in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN

Further reading[edit]

  • bastard in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • bastard in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Italian bastardo.

Noun[edit]

bastard m (plural bastarzi)

  1. bastard

Declension[edit]