bender

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See also: Bender

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

bend +‎ -er. In sense of “heavy drinking”, originally generally “spree”, from 1846,[1] of uncertain origin – vague contemporary sense of “something extraordinary”, connection to bend (e.g., bending elbow to drink) or perhaps from Scottish sense of “strong drinker”.[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bender (plural benders)

  1. One who, or that which, bends.
  2. A device to aid bending of pipes to a specific angle.
  3. (slang) A bout of heavy drinking.
    He's been out on a bender with his mates.
    • 1857, Newspaper, April:[2]
      A couple of students of Williams College went over to North Adams on a bender. This would have been serious matter under the best of circumstances, but each returned with a “brick in his hat,” etc.
  4. (chiefly Britain, slang, derogatory) A homosexual man.
  5. A simple shelter, made using flexible branches or withies
  6. (obsolete, Britain, slang) A sixpence.
    • 1836, Charles Dickens, The Pickwick Papers 42:
      What will you take to be paid out?’ said the butcher. ‘The regular chummage is two–and–six. Will you take three bob?’ ‘And a bender,’ suggested the clerical gentleman. ‘Well, I don’t mind that; it’s only twopence a piece more,’ said Mr. Martin. ‘What do you say, now? We’ll pay you out for three–and–sixpence a week. Come!’
  7. (obsolete, slang, US) A spree, a frolic.
  8. (obsolete, slang, US) Something exceptional.

Usage notes[edit]

In sense “bout of heavy drinking”, usually in form “on a bender”.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Interjection[edit]

bender

  1. (obsolete, British slang) Used to express disbelief or doubt at what one has just heard. [early 19th c.]
  2. (obsolete, British slang) Used to indicate that the previous phrase was meant sarcastically or ironically. [early 19th c.]
    O yes, I'll do it — bender!

Synonyms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. 1.0 1.1 bender” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary, 2001–2019.
  2. ^ Bartlett, Dictionary of Americanisms, Second Edition (1859), p. 29
  • Cassell’s Dictionary of Slang, p. 96
  • Eric Partridge, A Dictionary of the Underworld, London, Macmillan Co., 1949

Anagrams[edit]


Aragonese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

Verb[edit]

bender

  1. (transitive) to sell

References[edit]