bid

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See also: BID, bíd, bîd, bið, and -bid

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /bɪd/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɪd

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English bidden, from Old English biddan (to ask, demand), from Proto-Germanic *bidjaną (to ask), from Proto-Indo-European *gʷʰedʰ-. Conflated with Old English bēodan (to offer, announce) (see Etymology 2 below). Compare West Frisian bidde, Low German bidden, Dutch bidden ("to pray"), German bitten, Danish bede, Norwegian Bokmål be.

Verb[edit]

bid (third-person singular simple present bids, present participle bidding, simple past bid or bade or bad, past participle bid or bidden)

  1. (transitive) To issue a command; to tell.
    He bade me come in.
  2. (transitive) To invite; to summon.
    She was bidden to the wedding.
    • c. 1596–1598 (date written), William Shakespeare, “The Merchant of Venice”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies [] (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, →OCLC, [Act II, scene v]:
      Jessica: Call you? What is your will?
      Shylock: I am bid forth to supper, Jessica: / [...] But wherefore should I go? / I am not bid for love; they flatter me;
    • 1970, King Crimson (lyrics and music), “Cirkus (including "Entry of the Chameleons")”, in Lizard:
      In his cloak of words strode the ringmaster, / Bid me join the parade
  3. (transitive) To utter a greeting or salutation.
    • c. 1596–1598 (date written), William Shakespeare, “The Merchant of Venice”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies [] (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, →OCLC, [Act I, scene iii]:
      Portia: If I could bid the fifth welcome with so good heart as I / can bid the other four farewell, I should be glad of his / approach; []
    • 1960 November, L. Hyland, “The Irish Scene”, in Trains Illustrated, page 691:
      The last train—a three-coach A.E.C. unit—from Belfast to Crumlin and back, was bade farewell with fog signals as it carried a capacity crowd of last-trip travellers.
Usage notes[edit]

The inflected forms bade, bad, and bidden are becoming less common (outside certain set phrases like “bade farewell”) than uninflected bid.[1]

Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English beden, from Old English bēodan (to offer, announce), from Proto-Germanic *beudaną (to offer), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰewdʰ- (be awake, aware). Conflated with Old English biddan (to ask, demand) (see Etymology 1 above). Compare Low German beden, Dutch bieden, German bieten, Danish byde, Norwegian Bokmål by. More at bede.

Verb[edit]

bid (third-person singular simple present bids, present participle bidding, simple past and past participle bid)

  1. (intransitive) To make an offer to pay or accept a certain price.
    Have you ever bid in an auction?
  2. (transitive) To offer as a price.
    She bid £2000 for the Persian carpet.
  3. (intransitive) To make an attempt.
    He was bidding for the chance to coach his team to victory once again.
  4. (transitive, intransitive, card games) To announce (one's goal), before starting play.
  5. (obsolete) To proclaim (a bede, prayer); to pray.
  6. (transitive, intransitive, trucking) To take a particular route regularly.
    I can't believe he bid the Syracuse turn; that can be brutal in the winter!
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

bid (plural bids)

  1. An offer at an auction, or to carry out a piece of work.
    His bid was $35,000.
    a bid for a lucrative transport contract
  2. (ultimate frisbee) A (failed) attempt to receive or intercept a pass.
    Nice bid!
  3. An attempt, effort, or pursuit (of a goal).
    Their efforts represented a sincere bid for success.
    She put in her bid for the presidency.
    He put in his bid for office.
    • 2012 May 13, Alistair Magowan, “Sunderland 0-1 Man Utd”, in BBC Sport[1]:
      Then, as the Sunderland fans' cheers bellowed around the stadium, United's title bid was over when it became apparent City had pinched a last-gasp winner to seal their first title in 44 years.
    • 1967 May, William F. Nolan, George Clayton Johnson, Logan's Run, Bantam Books, published 1976, →ISBN, page 16:
      [Running,] Doyle had passed up a dozen chances to go underground. He was swinging east again making another bid for Arcade.
  4. (trucking) A particular route that a driver regularly takes from their domicile.
    I can't stand this new bid I'm on, even if the mileage is better.
  5. (prison slang) A prison sentence.
    • 2007, Psych (TV series):
      "So we 'lawyered up'. That's how they say it in the bucket, son, where I did an eight-hour bid."
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Bid, bade, bidden”, Grammarist

Anagrams[edit]

Afrikaans[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch bidden.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

bid (present bid, present participle biddende, past participle gebid)

  1. to pray

References[edit]

Cimbrian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Related to German Weide (willow; wicker).

Noun[edit]

bid m (plural biddardiminutive biddale)

  1. (Sette Comuni) wicker, osier

Declension[edit]

References[edit]

  • “bid” in Martalar, Umberto Martello; Bellotto, Alfonso (1974) Dizionario della lingua Cimbra dei Sette Communi vicentini, 1st edition, Roana, Italy: Instituto di Cultura Cimbra A. Dal Pozzo

Danish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse bit n, from Proto-Germanic *bitą. Derived from the verb *bītaną (to bite).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bid n (singular definite biddet, plural indefinite bid)

  1. bite (act of biting)
Inflection[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse biti m, from Proto-Germanic *bitô, cognate with German Bissen. Derived from the verb *bītaną (to bite).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bid c (singular definite bidden, plural indefinite bidder)

  1. bit, morsel
  2. bite, mouthful
Inflection[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [ˈb̥iˀð], [ˈb̥iðˀ]

Verb[edit]

bid

  1. imperative of bide

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

bid

  1. inflection of bidden:
    1. first-person singular present indicative
    2. imperative

Old Irish[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

bid

  1. inflection of is:
    1. third-person singular past subjunctive
    2. third-person singular future

Noun[edit]

bid

  1. accusative/dative singular of buith (being)

Mutation[edit]

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
bid bid
pronounced with /v(ʲ)-/
mbid
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Polish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bid f

  1. genitive plural of bida

Volapük[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bid (nominative plural bids)

  1. (taxonomy) genus
  2. sort; kind; type
  3. race

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Welsh[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

bid

  1. (literary) third-person singular imperative of bod

Synonyms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
bid fid mid unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Zhuang[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bid (Sawndip forms or 𧏻, 1957–1982 spelling bid)

  1. cicada
    Synonyms: (dialectal) biqrengh, (dialectal) nengzceq