bigot

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French bigot (a sanctimonious person; a religious hypocrite), from Middle French bigot, from Old French bigot, of uncertain origin. It is often thought to derive from an Old French derogatory term applied to the religious Normans, said to be known for frequently swearing Middle English bi God (by God) (compare Old English bī god, Middle High German bī got, Middle Dutch bi gode), which in any case is thought to be the origin of the surname Bigott, Bygott. (Compare the French use of "goddamns" to refer to the English in Joan of Arc's time.) Liberman however thinks this has "too strong a taste of a folk etymological guess invented in retrospect" and prefers Grammont et al.'s theory that it derives from Albigot (Albigensian heretic).[1] From meaning someone overly (hypocritically or superstitiously) religious it came to mean someone overly devoted to their own religious opinion, and then to its current sense.[2]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bigot (plural bigots)

  1. One who is narrow-mindedly devoted to their own ideas and groups, and intolerant of (people of) differing ideas, races, genders, religions, politics, etc.
  2. (obsolete) One who is overly pious in matters of religion, often hypocritically or else superstitiously so.
    • 1653, Urquhart, translating Gargantua and Pantagruel by François Rabelais, book 1:
      He is no bigot or hypocrite, he is not torn and divided betwixt reality and appearance, no wretch of a rugged and peevish disposition, but honest, jovial, resolute, and a good fellow.
    • 1664, Henry More, A Modest Enquiry Into the Mystery of Iniquity, page 436:
      Thus one part of their Church becomes Sotts and Bigots; and the other that behold this Scene of things, though they profess themselves of their Church, become a company of profane Atheists and clancular Deriders of all Religion. [] Nay it is a question whether those that do more superstitiously cleave to them, doe it not rather in a kind of confusion and obstupefaction of mind out of fear and suspicion, then any determinate assurance or firm belief of the things they outwardly profess.
    • 1820, Charles Maturin, Melmoth the Wanderer, volume 3:
      Donna Clara was a woman of a cold and grave temper, with all the solemnity of a Spaniard, and all the austerity of a bigot.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ OUP blog
  2. ^ bigot” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary, 2001–2020.

Further reading[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Noun[edit]

bigot m (plural bigots)

  1. Alternative form of bigoti

Cebuano[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • Hyphenation: bi‧got

Adjective[edit]

bigot

  1. (of a woman) buxom; having a full, voluptuous figure, especially possessing large breasts
  2. sleek; slim and streamlined

Quotations[edit]

For quotations of use of this term, see Citations:bigot.


Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French bigot, from Middle French bigot.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /biˈɣɔt/, /biˈʒɔt/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: bi‧got
  • Rhymes: -ɔt

Adjective[edit]

bigot (comparative bigotter, superlative bigotst)

  1. holier-than-thou, excessively pious
    Synonym: kwezelachtig
  2. sanctimonious
    Synonym: schijnheilig

Inflection[edit]

Inflection of bigot
uninflected bigot
inflected bigotte
comparative bigotter
positive comparative superlative
predicative/adverbial bigot bigotter het bigotst
het bigotste
indefinite m./f. sing. bigotte bigottere bigotste
n. sing. bigot bigotter bigotste
plural bigotte bigottere bigotste
definite bigotte bigottere bigotste
partitive bigots bigotters

Noun[edit]

bigot m (plural bigotten)

  1. A holier-than-thou person, an extremely pious person.
    Synonyms: femelaar, kwezel, pilaarbijter

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Maybe from Middle French bigot, from Old French bigot, a derogatory term applied to Normans for their frequent note of the Old English oath god (by God).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bigot m (plural bigots, feminine bigote)

  1. bigot, holier-than-thou

Adjective[edit]

bigot (feminine singular bigote, masculine plural bigots, feminine plural bigotes)

  1. over-pious, holier-than-thou

Further reading[edit]


Polish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French bigot.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bigot m pers (feminine bigotka)

  1. bigot, holier-than-thou
    Synonyms: dewot, nabożniś, pobożniś, religiant, świętoszek

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • bigot in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • bigot in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French bigot.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /bǐɡot/
  • Hyphenation: bi‧got

Noun[edit]

bìgot m (Cyrillic spelling бѝгот)

  1. bigot

Declension[edit]

References[edit]

  • bigot” in Hrvatski jezični portal