bill

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See also: Bill and bíll

English[edit]

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 bill on Wikipedia

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /bɪl/, [bɪɫ], enPR: bîl
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɪl

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English bill, bille, bil, from Old English bil, bill (a hooked point; curved weapon; two-edged sword), from Proto-Germanic *bilją (axe; sword; blade), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰeyH- (to strike; beat). Cognate with West Frisian bile (axe), Dutch bijl (axe), German Bille (axe).

Noun[edit]

bill (plural bills)

  1. Any of various bladed or pointed hand weapons, originally designating an Anglo-Saxon sword, and later a weapon of infantry, especially in the 14th and 15th centuries, commonly consisting of a broad, heavy, double-edged, hook-shaped blade, with a short pike at the back and another at the top, attached to the end of a long staff.
    Synonym: polearm
  2. A cutting instrument, with hook-shaped point, and fitted with a handle, used in pruning, etc.; a billhook.
    Synonyms: billhook, hand bill, hedge bill
  3. Somebody armed with a bill; a billman.
    Synonym: billman
  4. A pickaxe, or mattock.
  5. (nautical) The extremity of the arm of an anchor; the point of or beyond the fluke (also called the peak).
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

bill (third-person singular simple present bills, present participle billing, simple past and past participle billed)

  1. (transitive) To dig, chop, etc., with a bill.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English bill, bil, bille, bile, from Old English bile (beak (of a bird); trunk (of an elephant)), of unknown origin. Perhaps from a special use of Old English bil, bill (hook; sword) (see above).

Noun[edit]

bill (plural bills)

  1. The beak of a bird, especially when small or flattish; sometimes also used with reference to a platypus, turtle, or other animal.
    • 1595, William Shakespeare, A Midsummer Night's Dream, Act III, Scene I, line 125.
      The woosel cock so black of hue, With orange-tawny bill, The throstle with his note so true, The wren with little quill...
    • 2014 December 23, Olivia Judson, “The hemiparasite season [print version: Under the hemiparasite, International New York Times, 24–25 December 2014, page 7]”, in The New York Times[1], archived from the original on 23 December 2014:
      [] The flesh [of the mistletoe berry] is sticky, and forms strings and ribbons between my thumb and forefinger. For the mistletoe, this viscous goop – and by the way, viscous comes to English from viscum – is crucial. The stickiness means that, after eating the berries, birds often regurgitate the seeds and then wipe their bills on twigs – leading to the seeds' getting glued to the tree, where they can germinate and begin the cycle anew.
    Synonyms: beak, neb, nib, pecker
  2. A beak-like projection, especially a promontory.
  3. Of a cap or hat: the brim or peak, serving as a shade to keep sun off the face and out of the eyes.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

bill (third-person singular simple present bills, present participle billing, simple past and past participle billed)

  1. (obsolete) to peck
  2. to stroke bill against bill, with reference to doves; to caress in fondness
    • c. 1598–1600, William Shakespeare, “As You Like It”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act III, scene iii]:
      As the ox hath his bow, sir, the horse his curb and the falcon her bells, so man hath his desires; and as pigeons bill, so wedlock would be nibbling.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Middle English bille, from Anglo-Norman bille, from Old French bulle, from Medieval Latin bulla (seal", "sealed document). Compare bull.

Noun[edit]

bill (plural bills)

  1. A written list or inventory. (Now obsolete except in specific senses or set phrases; bill of lading, bill of goods, etc.)
  2. A document, originally sealed; a formal statement or official memorandum. (Now obsolete except with certain qualifying words; bill of health, bill of sale etc.)
  3. A draft of a law, presented to a legislature for enactment; a proposed or projected law.
    • 1600, William Shakespeare, The Merry Wives of Windsor, Act II, Scene I, line 28.
      Why, I'll exhibit a bill in the parliament for the putting down of men.
    • 2012 December 14, Simon Jenkins, “We mustn't overreact to North Korea boys' toys”, in The Guardian Weekly[2], volume 188, number 2, page 23:
      David Cameron insists that his latest communications data bill is “vital to counter terrorism”. Yet terror is mayhem. It is no threat to freedom. That threat is from counter-terror, from ministers capitulating to securocrats.
    Synonym: measure
  4. (obsolete, law) A declaration made in writing, stating some wrong the complainant has suffered from the defendant, or a fault committed by some person against a law.
    • 1853, Charles Dickens, Bleak House, ch 1:
      ... the legion of bills in the suit have been transformed into mere bills of mortality ...
  5. (US, Canada) A piece of paper money; a banknote.
    • 1830, Anon, The Galaxy of Wit: Or, Laughing Philosopher, Being a Collection of Choice Anecdotes, Many of Which Originated in or about "The Literary Emporium":
      He gave the change for a three dollar bill. Upon examination, the bill proved to be counterfeit.
    • 1935, Cabins in the Laurel[3], University of North Carolina Press, published 19 March 2014, →ISBN, page 231:
      [] So I wropped 'em up in a five dollar bill and tied 'em up and sent 'em, and they ain't back yet.”
    • 1970, “Friend of the Devil”, performed by Grateful Dead:
      I ran into the Devil, babe, he loaned me 20 bills.
  6. A written note of goods sold, services rendered, or work done, with the price or charge; an invoice.
    Synonyms: account, invoice
  7. A paper, written or printed, and posted up or given away, to advertise something, as a lecture, a play, or the sale of goods
    Synonyms: broadsheet, broadside, card, circular, flier, flyer, handbill, poster, posting, placard, notice, throwaway
  8. A writing binding the signer or signers to pay a certain sum at a future day or on demand, with or without interest, as may be stated in the document; a bill of exchange. In the United States, it is usually called a note, a note of hand, or a promissory note.
    • 1600, William Shakespeare, The Merry Wives of Windsor, Act I, Scene I, line 8.
      Ay, and Rato-lorum too; and a gentleman born, Master Parson; who writes himself Armigero, in any bill, warrant, quittance, or obligation, Armigero.
    Synonyms: bank bill, banker's bill, bank note, banknote, Federal Reserve note, government note, greenback, note
  9. A set of items presented together.
    • 2017 June 26, Alexis Petridis, “Glastonbury 2017 verdict: Radiohead, Foo Fighters, Lorde, Stormzy and more”, in the Guardian[4]:
      Meanwhile, the bills on the main stages skewed towards mainstream pop, with mixed results. Lorde’s Friday evening Other stage appearance was one of the weekend’s highlights. The staging and choreography were fantastic – a giant glass tank on a hydraulic platform, in and around which a troupe of dancers acted out the highs and lows of a teenage party
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • Thai: บิล (bin)
  • Tokelauan: pili
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.
See also[edit]

Verb[edit]

bill (third-person singular simple present bills, present participle billing, simple past and past participle billed)

  1. (transitive) To advertise by a bill or public notice.
    • 1962 October, G. Freeman Allen, “First impressions of the Clacton electric multiple-units”, in Modern Railways, page 260:
      [...] it will be recalled that in 1960 they were billed as the long-distance express multiple-units of the future, [...].
    Synonym: placard
  2. (transitive) To charge; to send a bill to.
    Synonym: charge
    • 1989, Michelle Green, Understanding Health Insurance: A Guide to Billing and Reimbursement
      The physician explains that this is an option for her and that she can sign the facility's ABN so that if Medicare denies the claim, the facility can bill her for the scan.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 4[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun[edit]

bill (plural bills)

  1. The bell, or boom, of the bittern.

Cimbrian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle High German wille, from Old High German willo, from Proto-Germanic *wiljô (will, wish, desire). Cognate with German Wille, English will.

Noun[edit]

bill m

  1. (Sette Comuni) will (legal document)
    Synonym: testamentén

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle High German wilde, from Old High German wildi, from Proto-West Germanic *wilþī, from Proto-Germanic *wilþijaz (wild). Cognate with German wild, English wild.

Adjective[edit]

bill (comparative billor, superlative dar billorste)

  1. (Sette Comuni) wild, crazy, mad
Declension[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • “bill” in Martalar, Umberto Martello; Bellotto, Alfonso (1974) Dizionario della lingua Cimbra dei Sette Communi vicentini, 1st edition, Roana, Italy: Instituto di Cultura Cimbra A. Dal Pozzo

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English bill; doublet of bulle (bubble).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bill m (plural bills)

  1. (law) bill (draft UK law)
  2. (Canada) bill (invoice in a restaurant etc)

Further reading[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Swedish bilder, from Old Norse bíldr, from Proto-Germanic *bīþlaz (axe). An instrumental derivation of *bītaną (to bite). Closely related to bila (broadaxe).

Noun[edit]

bill c

  1. (agriculture) a share; the cutting blade of a plough
Declension[edit]
Declension of bill 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative bill billen billar billarna
Genitive bills billens billars billarnas
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from English bill, from Middle English bille, from Anglo-Norman bille, from Old French bulle, from Medieval Latin bulla (seal, sealed document). Doublet of bulla.

Noun[edit]

bill c

  1. (law) a draft of a law in English-speaking countries
Declension[edit]
Declension of bill 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative bill billen biller billerna
Genitive bills billens billers billernas

References[edit]