bona fide

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: bonafide and bonâ fide

English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˌbəʊ.nəˈfaɪ.di/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈboʊnə.faɪd/, /ˌboʊnəˈfaɪdi/, /ˈbɑnə.faɪd/, /ˈboʊnəˌfiːdeɪ/
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Usage notes[edit]

The pronunciation /ˈboʊnə.faɪd/, is the most common one in the USA and therefore listed first in American dictionaries, incl. American Heritage, Merriam-Webster, Webster's Third New International Dictionary, and the American version of Collins.[1]

Etymology[edit]

From the Latin bonā fidē (in good faith), the ablative case of bona fidēs (good faith).

Adverb[edit]

bona fide (not comparable)

  1. In good faith; genuinely, sincerely.
    • 1791, Joseph Priestley, Letters to Burke, XII:
      Let thinking people, then, judge what must be the fate of a church, whose fundamental doctrines are disbelieved by men of sense and inquiry, whose articles are well known not to be subscribed bonâ fide by those who officiate in it [] .

Adjective[edit]

bona fide (not comparable)

  1. In good faith; sincere; without deception or ulterior motive.
    Synonym: sincere
    Antonym: mala fide
    Although he failed, the prime minister made a bona fide attempt to repair the nation's damaged economy.
  2. Genuine; not counterfeit.
    Synonyms: authentic, genuine
    Antonyms: bogus, counterfeit
    This is a bona fide Roman coin.
    • 2000, O Brother Where Art Thou? (movie):
      Ulysses Everett McGill: I am the only daddy you got! I’m the damn pater familias!
      Wharvey Gal: But you ain’t bona fide!

Usage notes[edit]

Sometimes misspelled as *bonafied, by incorrectly analyzing as the past participle of assumed *bonafy.[2]

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Webster's Third New International Dictionary, Unabridged
  2. ^ Bonafied / Bona Fide, Paul Brians

Czech[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin bona fide (in good faith), which is an ablative of bona fides (good faith).

Pronunciation[edit]

Phrase[edit]

bona fide

  1. bona fide (in good faith)

Further reading[edit]