bore

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See also: borë, bóre, and bóře

English[edit]

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Old English borian ‎(to pierce), from Proto-Germanic *burōną. Confer Danish bore, Norwegian bore, Dutch boren, German bohren, Old Norse bora. Cognate with Latin forō ‎(to bore, to pierce), Latin feriō ‎(strike, cut) and Albanian birë ‎(a hole). Sense of wearying may come from a figurative use such as "to bore the ears"; confer German drillen.

Boring a hole through a wooden plank with an auger.

Verb[edit]

bore ‎(third-person singular simple present bores, present participle boring, simple past and past participle bored)

  1. (transitive) To inspire boredom in somebody.
    • Shakespeare
      He bores me with some trick.
    • Carlyle
      [] used to come and bore me at rare intervals.
  2. (transitive) To make a hole through something.
    • Shakespeare
      I'll believe as soon this whole earth may be bored.
  3. (intransitive) To make a hole with, or as if with, a boring instrument; to cut a circular hole by the rotary motion of a tool.
    to bore for water or oil
    An insect bores into a tree.
  4. (transitive) To form or enlarge (something) by means of a boring instrument or apparatus.
    to bore a steam cylinder or a gun barrel; to bore a hole
    • T. W. Harris
      short but very powerful jaws, by means whereof the insect can bore [] a cylindrical passage through the most solid wood
  5. (transitive) To make (a passage) by laborious effort, as in boring; to force a narrow and difficult passage through.
    to bore one's way through a crowd
    • John Gay
      What bustling crowds I bored.
  6. (intransitive) To be pierced or penetrated by an instrument that cuts as it turns.
    This timber does not bore well.
  7. (intransitive) To push forward in a certain direction with laborious effort.
    • Dryden
      They take their flight [] boring to the west.
  8. (of a horse) To shoot out the nose or toss it in the air.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Crabb to this entry?)
  9. (obsolete) To fool; to trick.
    • Beaumont and Fletcher
      I am abused, betrayed; I am laughed at, scorned, / Baffled and bored, it seems.
Antonyms[edit]
Synonyms[edit]
Related terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
Bore of a Krupp 38 cm gun at Batterie Vara / Møvik Fort, Norway.

Noun[edit]

bore ‎(plural bores)

  1. A hole drilled or milled through something.
    the bore of a cannon
    • Francis Bacon
      the bores of wind instruments
  2. The tunnel inside of a gun's barrel through which the bullet travels when fired.
  3. A tool, such as an auger, for making a hole by boring.
  4. A capped well drilled to tap artesian water. The place where the well exists.
  5. One who inspires boredom or lack of interest.
  6. Something that wearies by prolixity or dullness; a tiresome affair.
    • Hawthorne
      It is as great a bore as to hear a poet read his own verses.
  7. Calibre; importance.
    • Shakespeare
      Yet are they much too light for the bore of the matter.
Synonyms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

bore ‎(plural bores)

  1. A sudden and rapid flow of tide in certain rivers and estuaries which rolls up as a wave; an eagre.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Verb[edit]

bore

  1. simple past tense of bear

Anagrams[edit]


Cornish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Celtic *bārego- ‎(morning) (compare Old Irish bárach ‎(tomorrow), modern Irish amárach, Breton beure).

Noun[edit]

bore m

  1. morning

Czech[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bore

  1. vocative singular of bor ("pine wood"):

Etymology 2[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bore

  1. vocative singular of bor ("boron"):

Anagrams[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ 2013, Čmejrková, Světla; Hoffmannová, Jana; Klímová, Jana, Čeština v pohledu synchronním a diachronním, ISBN 8024621215, page 433:

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

bore

  1. (archaic) singular present subjunctive of boren

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

French Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia fr

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bore m ‎(uncountable)

  1. boron

Anagrams[edit]

External links[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse bora

Verb[edit]

bore ‎(imperative bor, present tense borer, simple past and past participle bora or boret, present participle borende)

  1. to bore or drill (make a hole through something)

References[edit]


Welsh[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Welsh more, from Proto-Celtic *māregos (compare Cornish bore, Breton beure, Irish amáireach, amárach), from Proto-Indo-European *mr̥Hko (compare English morning, Lithuanian mérkti ‎(to blink, twinkle), Sanskrit मरीचि ‎(márīci, ray of light)), from *mer- ‎(to shimmer, shine).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bore m (plural boreau)

  1. morning

Derived terms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
bore fore more unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.