bore

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: bóre, borë, böre, bőre, bóře, bōrě, and boré

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English boren, from Old English borian (to pierce), from Proto-Germanic *burōną. Compare Danish bore, Norwegian Bokmål bore, Dutch boren, German bohren, Old Norse bora. Cognate with Latin forō (to bore, to pierce), Latin feriō (strike, cut) and Albanian birë (hole). Sense of wearying may come from a figurative use such as "to bore the ears"; compare German drillen.

Boring a hole through a wooden plank with an auger.

Verb[edit]

bore (third-person singular simple present bores, present participle boring, simple past and past participle bored)

  1. (transitive) To inspire boredom in somebody.
    Reading books really bores me, films are much more exciting.
    bore someone to death
  2. (transitive) To make a hole through something.
  3. (intransitive) To make a hole with, or as if with, a boring instrument; to cut a circular hole by the rotary motion of a tool.
    to bore for water or oil
    An insect bores into a tree.
  4. (transitive) To form or enlarge (something) by means of a boring instrument or apparatus.
    to bore a steam cylinder or a gun barrel; to bore a hole
    • 1862, Thaddeus William Harris, A Treatise on Some of the Insects Injurious to Vegetation
      short but very powerful jaws, by means whereof the insect can bore [] a cylindrical passage through the most solid wood
  5. (transitive) To make (a passage) by laborious effort, as in boring; to force a narrow and difficult passage through.
    to bore one's way through a crowd
  6. (intransitive) To be pierced or penetrated by an instrument that cuts as it turns.
    This timber does not bore well.
  7. (intransitive) To push forward in a certain direction with laborious effort.
  8. (of a horse) To shoot out the nose or toss it in the air.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Crabb to this entry?)
  9. (obsolete) To fool; to trick.
Synonyms[edit]
Antonyms[edit]
Related terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
Bore of a Krupp 38 cm gun at Batterie Vara / Møvik Fort, Norway.

Noun[edit]

bore (plural bores)

  1. A hole drilled or milled through something, or (by extension) its diameter.
    the bore of a cannon
    • 1631, [Francis Bacon], “II. Century.”, in Sylua Syluarum: Or A Naturall Historie. In Ten Centuries. [], 3rd edition, London: [] VVilliam Rawley; [p]rinted by J[ohn] H[aviland] for William Lee [], page 53, OCLC 1044372886:
      the bores of wind-instruments
  2. The tunnel inside of a gun's barrel through which the bullet travels when fired, or (by extension) its diameter.
  3. A tool, such as an auger, for making a hole by boring.
  4. A capped well drilled to tap artesian water. The place where the well exists.
  5. One who inspires boredom or lack of interest; an uninteresting person.
    My neighbour is such a bore when he talks about his coin collection.
  6. Something dull or uninteresting
    What a bore that movie was! There was no action, and the dialogue was totally uncreative.
    • 1871, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Passages from the French and Italian Notebooks
      It is as great a bore as to hear a poet read his own verses.
  7. Calibre; importance.
Synonyms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English *bore, bare, a borrowing from Old Norse bára (billow, wave). Cognate with Icelandic bára, Faroese bára.

Noun[edit]

bore (plural bores)

  1. A sudden and rapid flow of tide occuring in certain rivers and estuaries which rolls up as a wave.
    • 1898, H.G. Wells, The War of the Worlds, London: William Heinemann, page 102:
      In another moment a huge wave, like a muddy tidal bore, but almost scaldingly hot, came sweeping round the bend up-stream.
Synonyms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Verb[edit]

bore

  1. simple past tense of bear
  2. (now colloquial, nonstandard) past participle of bear
    • 1746, Charles Fearne, Minutes of the proceedings of a court-martial, aſſembled [] [1], London, page 159:
      Q. When the Fireſhip appeared to be going down towards the Real, do you think that the Dorſetſhire could have bore down in Time, to have covered and aſſiſted her?
    • 1834, Augustus Earle, A Narrative of a Nine Months' Residence in New Zealand in 1827 [] [2], pages 345-346:
      [] by altering their course a very little, and easily have bore down abreast of our settlement, without incurring the smallest risk!
    • 2006 February 10, Karl F. Hoffman; Jennifer M. Fitzpatrick, “The Application of DNA Microarrays in the Functional Study of Schisostome/Host Biology”, in W. Evan Secor; Daniel G. Colley, editors, Schistosomiasis, Springer Science & Business Media, →ISBN, page 101:
      The end of the 20th century and the start of the new millennium have bore witness to a remarkable revolution in the way parasite/host biological interactions can be conceptually designed and experimentally studied.

Anagrams[edit]


Cornish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Celtic *bāregos (morning). Compare Breton beure, Old Irish báireach and Old Irish bárach, whence i mbáireach and i mbárach (tomorrow), modern Irish amáireach (Munster, Connaught) and Irish amárach (Donegal).

Noun[edit]

bore m

  1. morning

Mutation[edit]


Czech[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bore

  1. vocative singular of bor ("pine wood"):

Etymology 2[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bore

  1. vocative singular of bor ("boron"):

Anagrams[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Čmejrková, Světla; Hoffmannová, Jana; Klímová, Jana (2013) Čeština v pohledu synchronním a diachronním (in Czech), →ISBN, page 433

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

bore

  1. (archaic) singular present subjunctive of boren

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

French Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia fr

Etymology[edit]

Coined by Joseph Louis Gay-Lussac and Louis Jacques Thénard in 1808, from the same root but independently of English boron.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bore m (uncountable)

  1. boron

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

A back-formation from boren; reinforced by Old Norse bora.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bore (plural bores)

  1. A bore, hole, puncture or indentation.
  2. A gap, cavity or piercing.
  3. (rare, euphemistic) The anus; the asshole.
Descendants[edit]
  • English: bore
  • Scots: bore, boir
References[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

bore

  1. Alternative form of boryn

Etymology 3[edit]

Noun[edit]

bore

  1. Alternative form of bor

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse bora

Verb[edit]

bore (imperative bor, present tense borer, simple past and past participle bora or boret, present participle borende)

  1. to bore or drill (make a hole through something)

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Verb[edit]

bore

  1. past participle of bera

Welsh[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Celtic *bāregos (morning). Compare Breton beure, Old Irish bárach (whence i mbárach (tomorrow), modern Irish amáireach and amárach).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bore m (plural boreau)

  1. morning

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
bore fore more unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.