brad

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
See also: Brad, bråd, and bráð

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Late Middle English brad, variant of brod(d), from Old Norse broddr (spike, shaft), from Proto-Germanic *bruzdaz (compare Old English brord, Old High German brort), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰrusdʰos (compare Welsh brath (sting, prick), Albanian bredh (fir-tree), Lithuanian bruzdùklis (bridle), Czech brzda (brake).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

brad (plural brads)

A brad (stationery fastener)
  1. A thin, small nail, with a slight projection at the top on one side instead of a head, or occasionally with a small domed head, similar to that of an escutcheon pin.
    • 1936, Djuna Barnes, Nightwood, Faber & Faber 2007, p. 5:
      Into the middle arch of each desk silver-headed brads had been hammered to form a lion, a bear, a ram, a dove, and in the midst a flaming torch.
  2. (US, elementary school usage) A paper fastener, a fastening device formed of thin, soft metal, such as shim brass, with a round head and a flat, split shank, which is spread after insertion in a hole in a stack of pages, in much the same way as a cotter pin or a split rivet.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Verb[edit]

brad (third-person singular simple present brads, present participle bradding, simple past and past participle bradded)

  1. (transitive) To attach using a brad.
  2. (transitive) To upset the end of a rod inserted in a hole so as to prevent it from being pulled out, as when riveting.

Anagrams[edit]


Aromanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Possibly borrowed from Old Albanian *bradh (modern bredh), or alternatively a substratum cognate of it, and ultimately from an Indo-European source either way (a borrowing directly from modern Albanian would have presumably produced a form *brez).

Noun[edit]

brad m (plural bradz)

  1. fir tree

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]


Czech[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

brad f

  1. genitive plural of brada

Danish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse bráð, from from Proto-Germanic *brēdô, cognate with German Braten.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [ˈb̥ʁɑð], [ˈb̥ʁɑˀð]

Noun[edit]

brad c (singular definite braden, plural indefinite brade)

  1. (archaic) roast

Inflection[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse bráðr, from Proto-Germanic *brēþaz (in a hurry), cognate with Swedish bråd

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

brad (neuter bradt, plural and definite singular attributive brade)

  1. (archaic) sudden, quick
References[edit]

Irish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Irish brat (spoil, plunder, robbery).

Noun[edit]

brad f (genitive singular braide)

  1. (literary) plunder
Declension[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
  • bradach m (thief, plunderer)
  • bradach (thieving; scoundrelly;, adjective)
  • bradaigh (steal, pilfer; remove gently; steal away, verb)
  • bradaíl f ((act of) thieving, pilfering; trespassing on crops)
  • bradaí f (proneness to thieving)
  • bradaí m (pilferer, thief; person with prominent teeth)
  • bradóg f (roguish woman)

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

brad (present analytic bradann, future analytic bradfaidh, verbal noun bradadh, past participle bradta)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) Alternative form of bradaigh (steal, pilfer; remove gently; steal away)
Conjugation[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
brad bhrad mbrad
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References[edit]


Megleno-Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Possibly borrowed from Old Albanian *bradh (modern bredh), or alternatively a substratum cognate of it, and ultimately from an Indo-European source either way (a borrowing directly from modern Albanian would have presumably produced a form *brez).

Noun[edit]

brad

  1. fir tree

Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-West Germanic *braid.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

brād

  1. broad

Declension[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Middle English: brood, brod, brode
    • English: broad
    • Scots: braid

Old Frisian[edit]

Brād.

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *braudą. Cognates include Old English brēad, Old Saxon brōd and Old Dutch *brōd.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

brād n

  1. bread

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • Bremmer, Rolf H. (2009) An Introduction to Old Frisian: History, Grammar, Reader, Glossary, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, →ISBN

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Possibly borrowed from Old Albanian *bradh (modern Albanian bredh), or alternatively a substratum cognate of it, and ultimately from an Indo-European source either way (a borrowing directly from modern Albanian would have presumably produced a form *brez).[1] Another theory suggests that it was reformed analogically from the plural brazi, and that the original form was *braz (reinterpreted as a plural, modeled on plurals such as coadă > cozi, pradă > prăzi, surd, > surzi). See also the Romanian alpine toponyms containing Breaza, which may correspond to the Albanian plural form bredha[2]. Compare also Aromanian brad.

Noun[edit]

brad m (plural brazi)

  1. fir, Abies alba.
  2. pine tree.
  3. pine wood.

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

References[edit]


Tagalog[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Shortening and phoneticized spelling of English brother

Noun[edit]

brad

  1. (informal, colloquial, familiar) comrade, peer, buddy (used on addressing between male peers)

Synonyms[edit]



Volapük[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French bras.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

brad (nominative plural brads)

  1. arm

Declension[edit]


Welsh[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Brythonic *brad, from Proto-Celtic *mratom.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

brad m (usually uncountable, plural bradau or bradiau)

  1. treason
  2. treachery

Mutation[edit]

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
brad frad mrad unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.