brak

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: Brak, bräk, bråk, and břak

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.
Particularly: “Afrikaans brak?”

Adjective[edit]

brak (comparative more brak, superlative most brak)

  1. (South Africa) Brackish.
    • 1995, Bill Sheat, Gerald Schofield, Complete Gardening in Southern Africa (page 437)
      Brak soils, which continue to be a subject of research, are unlikely to provide a major stumbling block [] However, brak conditions and their effects underline many of the principles of good soil management []

Anagrams[edit]


Crimean Tatar[edit]

Etymology[edit]

German Brack (defective goods, defect, flaw).

Noun[edit]

brak

  1. defect

Declension[edit]

References[edit]

  • Mirjejev, V. A.; Usejinov, S. M. (2002) Ukrajinsʹko-krymsʹkotatarsʹkyj slovnyk [Ukrainian – Crimean Tatar Dictionary]‎[1], Simferopol: Dolya, →ISBN

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /brɑk/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: brak
  • Rhymes: -ɑk

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle Dutch brac. This etymology is incomplete. You can help Wiktionary by elaborating on the origins of this term.

Adjective[edit]

brak (comparative brakker, superlative brakst)

  1. brackish
  2. (colloquial) bad
  3. (colloquial) hung over
Inflection[edit]
Inflection of brak
uninflected brak
inflected brakke
comparative brakker
positive comparative superlative
predicative/adverbial brak brakker het brakst
het brakste
indefinite m./f. sing. brakke brakkere brakste
n. sing. brak brakker brakste
plural brakke brakkere brakste
definite brakke brakkere brakste
partitive braks brakkers
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • Papiamentu: brak
  • Sranan Tongo: brak

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle Dutch bracke. Compare German Bracke, French braque, English brach, Italian bracco, Spanish braco. This etymology is incomplete. You can help Wiktionary by elaborating on the origins of this term.

Noun[edit]

brak m or f (plural brakken, diminutive brakje n)

  1. hound, brach (of either sex)
    Synonym: jachthond

Etymology 3[edit]

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb[edit]

brak

  1. singular past indicative of breken

Anagrams[edit]


Gothic[edit]

Romanization[edit]

brak

  1. Romanization of 𐌱𐍂𐌰𐌺

Icelandic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse brak.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

brak n (genitive singular braks, no plural)

  1. crash, din
  2. wreckage, broken wood, etc.

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Polish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Middle Low German brak.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

brak m inan

  1. lack, dearth, scarcity
  2. defect

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

adjectives

Verb[edit]

brak (defective verb)

  1. (intransitive) there is/are no; is/are wanting (+ genitive)
    Na parkingu brak wolnych miejsc.There is no vacant space in the parking lot.

Conjugation[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • brak in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • brak in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *borkъ.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

brȃk m (Cyrillic spelling бра̑к)

  1. marriage

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Uzbek[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Russian брак (brak), from Polish brak, from Middle Low German brak (flaw, defect; breaking).

Noun[edit]

brak (plural braklar)

  1. reject, defective product

Declension[edit]

* Note: The type of possessive is not specified.