bubble

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English[edit]

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A soap bubble.

Etymology[edit]

Partly imitative, also influenced by burble.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bubble (plural bubbles)

  1. A spherically contained volume of air or other gas, especially one made from soapy liquid.
  2. A small spherical cavity in a solid material.
    bubbles in window glass, or in a lens
  3. Anything resembling a hollow sphere.
  4. (economics) A period of intense speculation in a market, causing prices to rise quickly to irrational levels as the metaphorical bubble expands, and then fall even more quickly as the bubble bursts (eg the South Sea Bubble).
  5. (obsolete) Someone who has been ‘bubbled’ or fooled; a dupe.
    • Prior
      Granny's a cheat, and I'm a bubble.
    • 1749, Henry Fielding, Tom Jones, Folio Society 1979, p. 15:
      For no woman, sure, will plead the passion of love for an excuse. This would be to own herself the mere tool and bubble of the man.
  6. (figuratively) The emotional and/or physical atmosphere in which the subject is immersed; circumstances, ambience.
  7. (Cockney rhyming slang) a Greek (also: bubble and squeak)
  8. A small, hollow, floating bead or globe, formerly used for testing the strength of spirits.
  9. The globule of air in the spirit tube of a level.
  10. Anything lacking firmness or solidity; a cheat or fraud; an empty project.
    • Shakespeare
      Then a soldier [] / Seeking the bubble reputation / Even in the cannon's mouth.

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

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Verb[edit]

bubble (third-person singular simple present bubbles, present participle bubbling, simple past and past participle bubbled)

  1. (intransitive) To produce bubbles, to rise up in bubbles (such in foods cooking).
  2. (transitive, archaic) To cheat, delude.
    • 1749, Henry Fielding, Tom Jones, Folio Society 1973, p. 443:
      No, no, friend, I shall never be bubbled out of my religion in hopes only of keeping my place under another government []
    • Addison
      She has bubbled him out of his youth.
    • Sterne
      The great Locke, who was seldom outwitted by false sounds, was nevertheless bubbled here.
  3. (intransitive, Scotland and Northern England) To cry, weep.

Quotations[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  • Newcastle 1970s, Scott Dobson and Dick Irwin, [1]
  • The New Geordie Dictionary, Frank Graham, 1987, ISBN 0946928118
  • A Dictionary of North East Dialect, Bill Griffiths, 2005, Northumbria University Press, ISBN 1904794165