bucca

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English[edit]

Noun[edit]

bucca (plural buccas)

  1. (Britain) A storm spirit in Cornish folklore, formerly believed to inhabit mines and coastal communities.
    • 2008, Oliver Berry, Belinda Dixon, Devon, Cornwall & Southwest England (page 273)
      a fabled menagerie of fairies, buccas, sprites and giants

Interlingua[edit]

Noun[edit]

bucca (plural buccas)

  1. mouth

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Uncertain.

Celtic origin suspected because Gaulish Buccus, Buccō, Bucciō are Celtic names and the Larzac tablet mentions bocca and boca (although their meanings are unknown). In such a case, may be from Proto-Indo-European *bʰeHw- (to swell, puff), itself imitative.

However, de Vaan doubts this version.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈbuk.ka/, [ˈbʊk.ka]
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

bucca f (genitive buccae); first declension

  1. puffed cheek
  2. (anatomy) mouth

Inflection[edit]

First declension.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative bucca buccae
Genitive buccae buccārum
Dative buccae buccīs
Accusative buccam buccās
Ablative buccā buccīs
Vocative bucca buccae

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

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References[edit]


Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *bukkô (male goat), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰugo- (buck). Akin to Old High German boc, Old Norse bukkr, Middle Dutch boc, Avestan 𐬠𐬏𐬰𐬀(būza, buck, goat), Old Armenian բուծ (buc, lamb), Old English bucc (male deer).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bucca m (nominative plural buccan)

  1. he-goat

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Sicilian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin bucca.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈbukka/
  • Hyphenation: bùc‧ca

Noun[edit]

bucca f (plural bucchi)

  1. mouth