bucca

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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from Cornish bucca.

Noun[edit]

bucca (plural buccas)

  1. (Britain) A storm spirit in Cornish folklore, traditionally believed to inhabit mines and coastal communities.
    • 2008, Oliver Berry; Belinda Dixon, Devon, Cornwall & Southwest England, page 273:
      a fabled menagerie of fairies, buccas, sprites and giants

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from Latin bucca (the cheek).

Noun[edit]

bucca (plural buccae)

  1. (anatomy) Synonym of cheek.

References[edit]

  • bucca”, in Merriam–Webster Online Dictionary, (Please provide a date or year).

Cornish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Possibly borrowed from Old English puca (demon, goblin). Or, from Irish púca (hobgoblin).

Noun[edit]

bucca

  1. hobgoblin

References[edit]

  • Daimler, M. (2017). Fairies: A Guide to the Celtic Fair Folk. United Kingdom: John Hunt Publishing
  • Isles of Wonder: the cover story. (n.d.). (n.p.): Lulu.com, p. 181

Interlingua[edit]

Noun[edit]

bucca (plural buccas)

  1. mouth

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Uncertain. Celtic origin is suspected because of such names as Gaulish Buccus, Buccō, Bucciō as well as the appearance of words bocca and boca (of unknown meaning) on the Larzac tablet. In this case, may be from Proto-Indo-European *bʰeHw- (to swell, puff), possibly imitative. However, de Vaan 2008 doubts this etymology.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bucca f (genitive buccae); first declension

  1. (anatomy):
    1. the soft part of the cheek puffed or filled out in speaking or eating
    2. (in the plural) the jaw
    3. (colloquial) the mouth
      Synonym: ōs
      Lucius Pomponius, Comedies 150:
      sī valēbit, puls in buccam bētet
      if he's well, the porridge will find a way into his mouth
  2. (metonymically):
    1. one who fills his cheeks in speaking; declaimer, bawler
    2. one who stuffs out his cheeks in eating; parasite
    3. a mouthful
  3. (transferred sense) any cavity in general
  4. (hapax) A catchword of uncertain meaning used in a guessing game, possibly equivalent (and even related) to English buck buck.

Usage notes[edit]

Found in the sense of 'mouth' already in Pomponius and Varro, as well as Cicero in the colloquial expression in buccam venīre (to come to mind first), indicating that the eventual replacement of ōs by this term had begun by the 1st century B.C.E..

Inflection[edit]

First-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative bucca buccae
Genitive buccae buccārum
Dative buccae buccīs
Accusative buccam buccās
Ablative buccā buccīs
Vocative bucca buccae

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *bukkô (male goat), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰugo- (buck). Akin to Old High German boc, Old Norse bukkr, Middle Dutch boc, Avestan 𐬠𐬏𐬰𐬀(būza, buck, goat), Old Armenian բուծ (buc, lamb), Old English bucc (male deer).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bucca m (nominative plural buccan)

  1. he-goat

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Sicilian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin bucca.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈbukka/
  • Hyphenation: bùc‧ca

Noun[edit]

bucca f (plural bucchi)

  1. mouth