bugger

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See also: Bugger

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

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From Middle English bougre (heretic), from Old French bougre, from Medieval Latin Bulgarus (Bulgar), from Old Church Slavonic блъгаринъ (blŭgarinŭ, Bulgarian), used in designation of heretics (especially the Bogomils, who arose around the 10th century AD in the First Bulgarian Empire), to whom various sexual practices such as anal sex were ascribed. Doublet of Bulgar.

Noun[edit]

bugger (plural buggers)

  1. (obsolete) A heretic.
  2. (UK law) Someone who commits buggery; a sodomite.
    The British Sexual Offences Act of 1967 is a buggers’ charter.
  3. (slang, derogatory, UK, Ireland, Australia, New Zealand, Hawaii, Commonwealth) A foolish or worthless person or thing; a despicable person.
    He's a silly bugger for losing his keys.
    The bugger’s given me the wrong change.
    My computer's being a bit of a bugger.
    • 1928, Frank Parker Day, Rockbound, Gutenberg Australia eBook #0500721h,
      “I’ll take it out on dat young bugger,” he thought viciously.
    • 1947, James Hilton, So Well Remembered, Gutenberg Australia eBook #0600371h:
      Here the cheers and shouts of the gallery were interrupted by a shabby little man in the back row who yelled out with piercing distinctness: “Don't matter what you call ’im now, George. The bugger’s dead.”
  4. (slang, UK, Ireland, Australia, New Zealand, Hawaii, Commonwealth) A situation that is aggravating or causes dismay; a pain.
    So you're stuck out in the woop-woop and the next train back is Thursday next week. Well, that's a bit of a bugger.
  5. (slang, UK, Ireland, Australia, New Zealand, Hawaii, Commonwealth) Someone viewed with affection; a chap.
    How are you, you old bugger?
  6. (slang, dated) A damn, anything at all.
    I don't give a bugger how important you think it is.
  7. (slang, UK, Ireland, Australia, New Zealand, Commonwealth) Someone who is very fond of something
    I'm a bugger for Welsh cakes.
  8. (slang, UK, US) A whippersnapper, a tyke.
    What is that little bugger up to now?
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Verb[edit]

bugger (third-person singular simple present buggers, present participle buggering, simple past and past participle buggered)

  1. (transitive, vulgar, Britain, Ireland, Australia, New Zealand) To have anal sex with, sodomize.
    To be buggered sore like a hobo's whore (Attributed to Harry Mclintock's 1920s era Big Rock Candy Mountain)
  2. (transitive, slang, vulgar in Britain, Ireland, Australia, New Zealand) To break or ruin.
    This computer is buggered! Oh no! I've buggered it up.
  3. (transitive, slang, vulgar) Expressing contemptuous dismissal of the grammatical object.
    Bugger Bognor. (Alleged to be the last words of King George V of the United Kingdom in response to a suggestion that he might recover from his illness and visit Bognor Regis.)
    Oh, bugger this! I'm going out for a beer instead.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Interjection[edit]

bugger

  1. (slang, Britain, Australia, New Zealand, vulgar) An expression of annoyance or displeasure.
    Bugger, I've missed the bus.
    • 1994, Richard Curtis, Four Weddings and a Funeral, spoken by Charles (Hugh Grant):
      Dear Lord, forgive me for what I am about to, ah, say in this magnificent place of worship. Bugger. Bugger! Bugger-bugger-bugger-bugger!
Synonyms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From bug (noun) +‎ -er.

Noun[edit]

bugger (plural buggers)

  1. One who sets a bug (surveillance device); one who bugs.
Related terms[edit]

French[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From bug +‎ -er.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

bugger

  1. (computing, also figurative) to malfunction, to glitch
    • 2021 April 15, Benjamin Bourgois, quotee, “Benjamin Bourgois: "On a été autorisés à s'embrasser"”, in La Provence, →ISSN, page 32:
      Quand je l’ai vue arriver, cela s’est passé comme dans la série, j’ai buggé. Elle était déjà trés jolie.
      When I saw her arrive, it happened like in the series: I glitched. She was already very pretty.

Conjugation[edit]

This is a regular -er verb, but the stem is written bugge- before endings that begin with -a- or -o- (to indicate that the -g- is a "soft" /ʒ/ and not a "hard" /ɡ/). This spelling-change occurs in all verbs in -ger, such as neiger and manger.