bypass

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English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English *bypassen, *bipassen (suggested by past participle by-past, bipast), equivalent to by- +‎ pass.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

bypass (plural bypasses)

  1. A road that passes around something, such as a residential area or business district.
  2. Going past or around
  3. A section of pipe that conducts a fluid around some other fixture
  4. An electrical shunt
  5. (medicine) An alternative passage created to divert a bodily fluid around a damaged organ; the surgical procedure to construct such a bypass

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

bypass (third-person singular simple present bypasses, present participle bypassing, simple past and past participle bypassed)

  1. To avoid an obstacle etc, by constructing or using a bypass
  2. To ignore the usual channels or procedures
    • 2022 November 16, Paul Bigland, “From rural branches to high-speed arteries”, in RAIL, number 970, page 52:
      Thanks to Brexit, many ferry companies now run direct from Ireland to the EU mainland, bypassing UK ports such as Fishguard, with an impact on traffic.

Translations[edit]

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English bypass.

Noun[edit]

bypass m

  1. bypass

Derived terms[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Unadapted borrowing from English bypass.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bypass m (plural bypasses or bypass)

  1. (medicine) bypass (a passage created around a damaged organ)
    Synonym: ponte

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Unadapted borrowing from English bypass.

Noun[edit]

bypass n (plural bypassuri)

  1. (medicine) bypass

Declension[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Unadapted borrowing from English bypass.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈbaipas/, [ˈbai̯.pas]

Noun[edit]

bypass m (plural bypass)

  1. bypass

Usage notes[edit]

According to Royal Spanish Academy (RAE) prescriptions, unadapted foreign words should be written in italics in a text printed in roman type, and vice versa, and in quotation marks in a manuscript text or when italics are not available. In practice, this RAE prescription is not always followed.