canon

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English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from Old French canon, from Latin canōn, from Ancient Greek κανών (kanṓn, measuring rod, standard), akin to κάννα (kánna, reed), perhaps from Semitic (compare Hebrew קָנֶה (qane, reed)). See also cane.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

Canons cast into the top of a bell - used for attaching to a headstock

canon (plural canons)

  1. A generally accepted principle; a rule.
    The trial must proceed according to the canons of law.
    • Shakespeare
      Or that the Everlasting had not fixed His canon 'gainst self-slaughter.
  2. A group of literary works that are generally accepted as representing a field.
    (Can we date this quote?) "the durable canon of American short fiction" — William Styron
  3. The works of a writer that have been accepted as authentic.
    the entire Shakespeare canon
  4. A eucharistic prayer, particularly the Roman Canon.
  5. A religious law or body of law decreed by the church.
    We must proceed according to canon law.
  6. A catalogue of saints acknowledged and canonized in the Roman Catholic Church.
  7. In monasteries, a book containing the rules of a religious order.
  8. A member of a cathedral chapter; one who possesses a prebend in a cathedral or collegiate church.
  9. A piece of music in which the same melody is played by different voices, but beginning at different times; a round.
    Pachelbel’s Canon has become very popular.
  10. (Roman law) A rent or stipend payable at some regular time, generally annual, e.g., canon frumentarius
    • 1919 January 1, Charles P. Sherman, “A Brief History of Imperial Roman Canon Law”, in California Law Review, volume 7, number 2, Berkeley, California: University of California, pages 96-97:
      The lessees of public lands had to pay a perpetual rent or "canon" at some periodical time.
  11. (fandom) Those sources, especially including literary works, which are considered part of the main continuity regarding a given fictional universe.
    A spin-off book series revealed the aliens to be originally from Earth, but it's not canon.
    • 2014, Phineas and Ferb: Star Wars
      Meanwhile, having learned the whereabouts of the Death Star's plans, the rebels send their best platypus agent to obtain them, in hopes of finding a weakness. And none of this is canon, so just relax.
  12. (cooking) A rolled and filleted loin of meat; also called cannon.
    a canon of beef or lamb
  13. (printing, dated) A large size of type formerly used for printing the church canons, standardized as 48-point.
  14. The part of a bell by which it is suspended; the ear or shank of a bell.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Knight to this entry?)
  15. (billiards) A carom.
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English canoun, ultimately from Latin canonicus (either by shortening or back-formation from Old English canonic, or via Anglo-Norman chanoine).

Noun[edit]

canon (plural canons)

  1. A clergy member serving a cathedral or collegiate church.
  2. A canon regular, a member of any of several Roman Catholic religious orders.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Noun[edit]

canon (plural canons)

  1. Alternative spelling of qanun

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Ancient Greek κανών (kanṓn, measuring rod, standard), akin to κάννα (kánna, reed), perhaps from Semitic (compare Hebrew קנה (qaneh, reed)).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈkaː.nɔn/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -anɔn
  • Hyphenation: ca‧non

Noun[edit]

canon m (plural canons, diminutive canonnetje n)

  1. canon (principle, literary works, prayer, religious law, music piece)

Derived terms[edit]


French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old French canon, from canne + -on, corresponding to Italian cannone.

Noun[edit]

canon m (plural canons)

  1. cannon, (big) gun
  2. barrel (of firearm)
  3. cannon for a horse.
  4. (slang) hottie, dish, bombshell (attractive man/woman)

Etymology 2[edit]

From the above noun by conversion.

Adjective[edit]

canon (plural canons)

  1. (informal, of a person) hot, sexy
    Cette nouvelle coupe de cheveux te va trop bien, t'es canon !

Etymology 3[edit]

From Old French canon, borrowed from Latin canōn, from Ancient Greek κανών (kanṓn, measuring rod, standard).

Noun[edit]

canon m (plural canons)

  1. canon
  2. (music) canon
  3. (religion) canon

Etymology 4[edit]

canne +‎ -on.

Noun[edit]

canon m (plural canons)

  1. (slang) glass of wine

Further reading[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Ancient Greek κανών (kanṓn, measuring rod, standard), akin to κάννα (kánna, reed), perhaps from Semitic (compare Hebrew קנה (qaneh, reed)).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

canōn m (genitive canonis); third declension

  1. a measuring line
  2. (figuratively) precept, rule, canon
  3. (Ecclesiastical Latin) catalog of sacred writings
  4. (Later Latin) a cannon (artillery)
  5. a yearly tribute paid to the emperor

Inflection[edit]

Third declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative canōn canonēs
genitive canonis canonum
dative canonī canonibus
accusative canonem canonēs
ablative canone canonibus
vocative canōn canonēs

Synonyms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]


Norman[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French canon.

Noun[edit]

canon m (plural canons)

  1. cannon

Old French[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

canne +‎ -on, corresponding to Italian cannone.

Noun[edit]

canon m (oblique plural canons, nominative singular canons, nominative plural canon)

  1. tube
  2. cannon

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from Latin canōn, from Ancient Greek κανών (kanṓn, measuring rod, standard).

  1. canon

Descendants[edit]


Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Greek κανών (kanón), possibly partly through a South Slavic language intermediate.

Noun[edit]

canon n (plural canoane)

  1. canon
  2. (usually in regards to religion) tenet, dogma, rule, norm, precept
  3. punishment or penance for breaking such a religious rule

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Spanish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia es

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin canōn[1], from Ancient Greek κανών (kanṓn, measuring rod, standard) (compare κάννα (kánna, reed)), perhaps of Semitic origin.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈkanon/, [ˈkanõn]

Noun[edit]

canon m (plural cánones)

  1. canon (principle, literary works, prayer, religious law, music piece)

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Welsh[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • canasom (literary, first-person plural)
  • canasant (literary, third-person plural)

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

canon

  1. (colloquial) first-person plural preterite of canu
  2. (colloquial) third-person plural preterite of canu

Mutation[edit]

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
canon ganon nghanon chanon
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.