canon

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See also: cannon, canyon, cañón, cañon, and kanon

English[edit]

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

From Old French canon, from Latin canōn, from Ancient Greek κανών ‎(kanṓn, measuring rod, standard), akin to κάννα ‎(kánna, reed), perhaps from Semitic (compare Hebrew קָנֶה ‎(qane, reed)). See also cane.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

Canons cast into the top of a bell - used for attaching to a headstock

canon ‎(plural canons)

  1. A generally accepted principle; a rule.
    The trial must proceed according to the canons of law.
    • Shakespeare
      Or that the Everlasting had not fixed His canon 'gainst self-slaughter.
  2. A group of literary works that are generally accepted as representing a field.
    (Can we date this quote?) "the durable canon of American short fiction" — William Styron
  3. The works of a writer that have been accepted as authentic.
    the entire Shakespeare canon
  4. A eucharistic prayer, particularly the Roman Canon.
  5. A religious law or body of law decreed by the church.
    We must proceed according to canon law.
  6. A catalogue of saints acknowledged and canonized in the Roman Catholic Church.
  7. In monasteries, a book containing the rules of a religious order.
  8. A member of a cathedral chapter; one who possesses a prebend in a cathedral or collegiate church.
  9. A piece of music in which the same melody is played by different voices, but beginning at different times; a round.
    Pachelbel’s Canon has become very popular.
  10. (fandom) Those sources, especially including literary works, which are generally considered authoritative regarding a given fictional universe.
    A spin-off book series revealed the aliens to be originally from Earth, but it's not canon.
  11. (cooking) A rolled and filleted loin of meat.
    a canon of beef or lamb
  12. (printing, dated) A large size of type formerly used for printing the church canons, standardized as 48-point.
  13. ​The part of a bell by which it is suspended; the ear or shank of a bell.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Knight to this entry?)
  14. (billiards) A carom.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Ancient Greek κανών ‎(kanṓn, measuring rod, standard), akin to κάννα ‎(kánna, reed), perhaps from Semitic (compare Hebrew קנה ‎(qaneh, reed)).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

canon m ‎(plural canons, diminutive canonnetje n)

  1. canon (principle, literary works, prayer, religious law, music piece)

Derived terms[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French canon.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

canon m ‎(plural canons)

  1. cannon, (big) gun
  2. barrel (of firearm)
  3. canon
  4. (music) canon
  5. cannon for a horse.
  6. (religion) canon
  7. (slang) hottie, dish, bombshell (attractive man/woman)
  8. (slang) glass of wine

External links[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Ancient Greek κανών ‎(kanṓn, measuring rod, standard), akin to κάννα ‎(kánna, reed), perhaps from Semitic (compare Hebrew קנה ‎(qaneh, reed)).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

canōn m ‎(genitive canōnis); third declension

  1. a measuring line
  2. (figuratively) precept, rule, canon
  3. (Ecclesiastical Latin) catalog of sacred writings
  4. (Later Latin) a cannon (artillery)
  5. a yearly tribute paid to the emperor

Inflection[edit]

Third declension.

Number Singular Plural
nominative canōn canōnēs
genitive canōnis canōnum
dative canōnī canōnibus
accusative canōnem canōnēs
ablative canōne canōnibus
vocative canōn canōnēs

Synonyms[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Norman[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French canon.

Noun[edit]

canon m ‎(plural canons)

  1. cannon

Old French[edit]

Noun[edit]

canon m ‎(oblique plural canons, nominative singular canons, nominative plural canon)

  1. tube
  2. cannon
  3. canon

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Greek κανών ‎(kanón), possibly partly through a South Slavic language intermediate.

Noun[edit]

canon n (plural canoane)

  1. canon
  2. (usually in regards to religion) tenet, dogma, rule, norm, precept
  3. punishment or penance for breaking such a religious rule

Derived terms[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Spanish Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia es

Etymology[edit]

From Latin canōn, from Ancient Greek κανών ‎(kanṓn, measuring rod, standard) (compare κάννα ‎(kánna, reed)), perhaps of Semitic origin.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

canon m ‎(plural cánones)

  1. canon (principle, literary works, prayer, religious law, music piece)

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Welsh[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • canasom (literary, first-person plural)
  • canasant (literary, third-person plural)

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

canon

  1. (colloquial) first-person plural preterite of canu
  2. (colloquial) third-person plural preterite of canu

Mutation[edit]

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
canon ganon nghanon chanon
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.