canter

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English[edit]

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Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Short for Canterbury pace, from the supposed easy pace of medieval pilgrims to Canterbury.

Noun[edit]

canter ‎(plural canters)

  1. A gait of a horse between a trot and a gallop, consisting of three beats and a "suspension" phase, where there are no feet on the ground. Also describing this gait on other four legged animals.
  2. A ride on a horse at such speed.
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

canter ‎(third-person singular simple present canters, present participle cantering, simple past and past participle cantered)

  1. (intransitive) To move at such pace.
  2. (intransitive) To cause to move at a canter; to ride (a horse) at a canter.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

cant +‎ -er

Noun[edit]

canter ‎(plural canters)

  1. One who cants or whines; a beggar.
  2. One who makes hypocritical pretensions to goodness; one who uses canting language.
    • Macaulay
      The day when he was a canter and a rebel.

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Verb[edit]

canter

  1. first-person singular present passive subjunctive of canto

Norman[edit]

Etymology[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

Verb[edit]

canter

  1. (nautical) to list
  2. (reflexive) to lean

Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Latin cantō.

Verb[edit]

canter

  1. (Northern dialect) Alternative form of chanter

Conjugation[edit]

This verb conjugates as a first-group verb ending in -er. The forms that would normally end in *-ts, *-tt are modified to z, t. Old French conjugation varies significantly by date and by region. The following conjugation should be treated as a guide.