caracole

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See also: caracolé

English[edit]

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Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French caracole (noun, literally snail's shell), caracoler (verb).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

caracole (plural caracoles)

  1. A half-turn performed by a horse and rider in dressage.
  2. (cavalry) A combat maneuver where riders of the same squadron turn simultaneously to their left or to their right.
    • 1866, Henry Howard Brownell, “Abraham Lincoln (Summer, 1865)”, in War-Lyrics and Other Poems, Boston: Ticknor and Fields, page 127:
      How the chargers neigh and champ, / (Their riders weary of camp,) / With curvet and with caracole!
  3. (architecture) A spiral staircase.

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

caracole (third-person singular simple present caracoles, present participle caracoling, simple past and past participle caracoled)

  1. To execute a caracole.
    • 1819, Walter Scott, Ivanhoe
      Prince John, upon a grey and high-mettled palfrey, caracoled within the lists at the head of his jovial party, laughing loud with his train, and eyeing with all the boldness of royal criticism the beauties who adorned the lofty galleries.

French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from Spanish caracol.

Noun[edit]

caracole f (plural caracoles)

  1. (equestrianism) caracole
  2. (architecture) caracole
  3. (Belgium) snail

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

caracole

  1. inflection of caracoler:
    1. first-person and third-person singular present indicative
    2. first-person and third-person singular present subjunctive
    3. second-person singular imperative

Further reading[edit]


Walloon[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Spanish caracol.

Noun[edit]

caracole f (plural caracoles)

  1. snail