catchpole

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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Medieval Latin cacepollus, Old French chacepol (one who chases fowls) (or a northern variant thereof).

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

catchpole (plural catchpoles)

  1. (obsolete) A taxman, one who gathers taxes.
  2. A sheriff’s officer, usually one who arrests debtors.
Translations[edit]
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Etymology 2[edit]

From catch + pole.

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

catchpole (plural catchpoles)

  1. (historical) An implement formerly used for seizing and securing a man who would otherwise be out of reach.
    • 1843, Henry Shaw, Dresses and Decorations of the Middle Ages, W Pickering 1843:
      The use of the catch-pole is said to have been to take horsemen in battle by the neck and drag them from their horses.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  • catchpole in The Century Dictionary, The Century Co., New York, 1911