chi

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Translingual[edit]

Symbol[edit]

chi

  1. (international standards) ISO 639-2/B language code for Chinese.

English[edit]

Ancient Greek Alphabet

phi
Greek uc chi.png Greek lc chi.png
psi
Χ χ
Ancient Greek: χεῖ
Wikipedia article on chi
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin chī, from Ancient Greek χεῖ (kheî).

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /kaɪ/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -aɪ

Noun[edit]

chi (plural chis)

  1. The twenty-second letter of the Classical and Modern Greek alphabets.
Translations[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

From the Mandarin () Wade-Giles romanization: chʻi⁴, from Middle Chinese (MC kʰɨiH), from Old Chinese (OC *kʰɯds, “breath, vapor”). Compare modern Japanese () (ki), Korean (, gi) and Vietnamese khí ().

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

chi (usually uncountable, plural chis)

  1. (philosophy) A life force in traditional Chinese philosophy, culture, medicine, etc, related (but not limited) to breath and circulation.
    • [1987, “ch'i”, in Encyclopedia Britannica[1], volume 3, 15th edition, →ISBN, LCCN 85-82101, OCLC 852039661, page 186, column 3:
      Early Taoist philosophers and alchemists regarded ch'i as a vital force inhering in the breath and bodily fluids and developed techniques to alter and control the movement of ch'i within the body; their aim was to achieve physical longevity and spiritual power.]
    • 2001, Eoin Colfer, Artemis Fowl, Viking Press, page 196:
      He took several deep breaths, finding his chi as Butler had taught him.
Alternative forms[edit]
Related terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
See also[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

From the pinyin romanization of Mandarin (chǐ). Doublet of chek.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

chi (usually uncountable, plural chis)

  1. The Chinese foot, a traditional Chinese unit of length based on the human forearm.
  2. (Mainland China) The Chinese unit of length standardized in 1984 as 1/3 of a meter.
  3. (Taiwan) The Taiwanese unit of length standardized as 10/33 of a meter, identical to the Japanese shaku.
  4. (Hong Kong) The chek or Hong Kong foot, a unit of length standardized as 0.371475 meters.
Synonyms[edit]
Related terms[edit]
  • shaku, the equivalent Japanese unit

Etymology 4[edit]

Noun[edit]

chi (plural chis)

  1. Clipping of chihuahua.

Anagrams[edit]


Atsahuaca[edit]

Noun[edit]

chi

  1. fire

Cornish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Brythonic *tɨɣ, from Proto-Celtic *tegos, from Proto-Indo-European *(s)teg-.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (Revived Middle Cornish) IPA(key): [tʃiː]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • (Standard Cornish) chy

Noun[edit]

chi m (plural chiow or treven)

  1. (Standard Written Form) house

Mutation[edit]


Esperanto[edit]

Particle[edit]

chi

  1. H-system spelling of ĉi

Garo[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Bodo-Garo *tɯi¹ (water), from Proto-Tibeto-Burman *ti(y), from Proto-Sino-Tibetan *m-t(w)əj-n ~ m-ti-s (water; fluid; liquid; river; to soak; to spit). Cognate with Atong (India) tyi (water), Kokborok twi (water).

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

chi

  1. water

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • The Bodos in Assam: a socio-cultural study, year 2005-2006 (2007)

Guerrero Amuzgo[edit]

Noun[edit]

chi

  1. grandfather

Adverb[edit]

chi

  1. not

Italian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin quis, from Proto-Indo-European *kʷis, *kʷos.

Pronoun[edit]

chi

  1. (interrogative pronoun) who, whom
  2. (interrogative pronoun) whoever

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin quī, from Old Latin quei, from Proto-Italic *kʷoi.

Pronoun[edit]

chi

  1. (relative pronoun) who, whom
  2. (relative pronoun) whoever

Etymology 3[edit]

Italian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia it

From Latin chī, from Ancient Greek χεῖ (kheî).

Noun[edit]

chi m or f (invariable)

  1. chi (Greek letter)

References[edit]

chi in Luciano Canepari, Dizionario di Pronuncia Italiana (DiPI)


Japanese[edit]

Romanization[edit]

chi

  1. Rōmaji transcription of
  2. Rōmaji transcription of

K'iche'[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

chi

  1. and
  2. that
  3. in

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]


Kokborok[edit]

Numeral[edit]

chi

  1. ten

References[edit]

  • Binoy Debbarma, Concise Kokborok-English-Bengali Dictionary (2001)

Ladin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin quis, from Proto-Indo-European *kʷís. Cognates include French qui and Italian chi.

Pronoun[edit]

chi

  1. who, whoever

Lashi[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

chi

  1. what?

References[edit]

  • Hkaw Luk (2017) A grammatical sketch of Lacid[2], Chiang Mai: Payap University (master thesis)

Lombard[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Akin to Italian chi, from Latin quis.

Pronoun[edit]

chi

  1. who

Mandarin[edit]

Romanization[edit]

chi

  1. Nonstandard spelling of chī.
  2. Nonstandard spelling of chí.
  3. Nonstandard spelling of chǐ.
  4. Nonstandard spelling of chì.

Usage notes[edit]

  • English transcriptions of Mandarin speech often fail to distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without the appropriate indication of tone.

Norman[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)

Adjective[edit]

chi m

  1. Alternative form of chièr

Polish[edit]

Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Onomatopoeic.

Interjection[edit]

chi

  1. he (expression of laughter)

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from Ancient Greek χεῖ (kheî).

Noun[edit]

chi n (indeclinable)

  1. chi (Greek letter Χ, χ)

Etymology 3[edit]

Borrowed from Mandarin (), from Middle Chinese (MC kʰɨiH), from Old Chinese (OC *kʰɯds).

Noun[edit]

chi n (indeclinable)

  1. (philosophy, pseudoscience) chi (fundamental life-force or energy)

Further reading[edit]

  • chi in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • chi in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Portuguese[edit]

Noun[edit]

chi m (plural chis)

  1. (Portugal, colloquial) bear hug (any especially large, tight or enthusiastic hug)
    Synonym: chi-coração

Etymology[edit]

Noun[edit]

chi m (plural chis)

  1. Alternative form of qi

Sardinian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin quid, from Proto-Italic *kʷid, from Proto-Indo-European *kʷid.

Pronunciation[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

chi

  1. (Limba Sarda Comuna) that

Pronoun[edit]

chi

  1. (relative, Limba Sarda Comuna) who, whom, which (nominative and accusative case)

Sassarese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From a conflation of Latin quia, quod, and other conjunctions.

Pronunciation[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

chi

  1. that
    Li me' amigghi dìzini chi soggu simpàtiggu
    My friends say that I'm nice
  2. than
    Mégliu figlioru di la bonasorthi chi figlioru di re
    Better [to be] son of good luck than son of a king

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

chi

  1. (relative) who, whom, which
    Lu giràniu, chi ha curori dibessi, dura umbè di tempu fioriddu
    Geraniums, which have various colors, stay in blossom for a long time
    (literally, “The geranium, which has different colors, lasts a lot of time in blossom”)

Adjective[edit]

chi (invariable)

  1. Used in exclamations to indicate something remarkable; some, what a
    Chi festha!What a party!

References[edit]

  • Rubattu, Antoninu (2006) Dizionario universale della lingua di Sardegna, 2nd edition, Sassari: Edes

Vietnamese[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Sino-Vietnamese word from (branch; to spend).

Noun[edit]

chi

  1. (taxonomy) genus
    Synonym: giống
See also[edit]
Derived terms

Verb[edit]

chi

  1. to spend (money); to pay out; to disburse
See also[edit]
Derived terms

Etymology 2[edit]

Sino-Vietnamese word from .

Noun[edit]

chi

  1. (formal, anatomy, chiefly zoology) a limb
See also[edit]
Derived terms

Etymology 3[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.) Cognate with Muong Bi chi.

Pronoun[edit]

chi ()

  1. (Central Vietnam, literary elsewhere) what; whatever
    Synonym:
    Mi mần chi rứa?
    What are you doing over there?
    • (Can we date this quote?) “Tình đến rồi đi [Love Comes and Goes]”, performed by Thu Thủy:
      Cuộc tình đến rồi đi. Buồn làm chi nhung nhớ làm gì.
      Love comes and goes. Why be sad? Why be tormented by it?

Adverb[edit]

chi ()

  1. (Central Vietnam, Southern Vietnam) what for
    Làm vậy chi?
    What did you do that for?

Welsh[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle Welsh chwi, from Proto-Celtic *swīs (compare Breton c’hwi, Cornish hwi, Old Irish síi), from Proto-Indo-European *wos.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

chi

  1. you (plural; polite)
Usage notes[edit]
  • In the singular, chi is a polite form like French vous or German Sie.
  • Chi is a feature of most registers of Modern Welsh, whereas very literary Welsh employs chwi.
  • In certain southwestern dialects, chi is used as the indefinite personal pronoun like English you.

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

chi m

  1. aspirated form of ci
Mutation[edit]
Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
ci gi nghi chi
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Yola[edit]

Etymology[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun[edit]

chi

  1. A small quantity
    • 1867, GLOSSARY OF THE DIALECT OF FORTH AND BARGY:
      A chi of barach.
      A little barley.

References[edit]

  • Jacob Poole (1867), William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith, page 30

Zou[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Kuki-Chin *tsii, from Proto-Sino-Tibetan *dzəy. Cognates include Burmese အစေ့ (a.ce.).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

chi

  1. seed

Etymology 2[edit]

From Proto-Kuki-Chin *tsii, from Proto-Sino-Tibetan *m-tsji.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

chi

  1. salt

References[edit]

  • Lukram Himmat Singh (2013) A Descriptive Grammar of Zou, Canchipur: Manipur University, page 44