cofre

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Asturian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French coffre.

Noun[edit]

cofre m (plural cofres)

  1. safe (box in which valuables can be locked for safekeeping)

Synonyms[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French coffre, attested from the 13th century.[1]

Noun[edit]

cofre m (plural cofres)

  1. chest, coffer (large box often used for storage)

References[edit]

  1. ^ “cofre” in Gran Diccionari de la Llengua Catalana, Grup Enciclopèdia Catalana.

Further reading[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French cofre, coffre, from Latin cophinus, from Ancient Greek κόφινος (kóphinos). Doublet of coffyn.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈkɔfər/, /ˈkɔfrə/, /ˈkoːfər/

Noun[edit]

cofre (plural cofres)

  1. A coffer (box for valuables or money)
  2. A supply or store of money.
  3. A coffin; a box for burial.
  4. Any container or cavity.
  5. (rare) A place of secretion or hiding.

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • English: coffer
  • Scots: coffer

References[edit]


Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin cophinus, from Ancient Greek κόφινος (kóphinos, basket).

Noun[edit]

cofre m (oblique plural cofres, nominative singular cofres, nominative plural cofre)

  1. chest (large box often used for storage)

Descendants[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French coffre.

Noun[edit]

cofre m (plural cofres)

  1. safe (box in which valuables can be locked for safekeeping)

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French coffre. Cognate with English coffer. Doublet of cuévano.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cofre m (plural cofres)

  1. chest, coffer, trunk
    Synonyms: baúl, arca, arcón, arqueta
  2. safe
    Synonym: caja fuerte
  3. bonnet, hood (engine compartment of a car)

Usage notes[edit]

The difference between baúl and cofre are twofold. In terms of use, cofres are used almost exclusively to safeguard objects of value kind of like a treasure chest, whereas baúles can be used in such a way but are typically used just to store objects a person has no immediate use for such as old clothes. In terms of appearance, a cofre has a convex or rounded cover and thus is not always entirely synonymous with English coffer. A baúl can have any kind of shape. Thus, a cofre is a type of baúl. In terms of English, more often than not, you could only translate trunk as baúl, but you could translate either baúl or cofre for chest. A baúl you might bring with you on a trip to transport your belongings, but you don't travel with a cofre unless you are a pirate who finds a cofre de tesoro (treasure chest) and brings it aboard your ship.

Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Further reading[edit]