collation

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English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
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Etymology[edit]

From Middle English collacioun, collation, from Old French collation, from Latin collatiō, from the participle stem of cōnferō (to bring together). Not related to English collateral.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

collation (countable and uncountable, plural collations)

  1. Bringing together.
    1. The act of bringing things together and comparing them; comparison. [from 14th c.]
      • November 8, 1717, The Bishop of Rochester, letter to Alexander Pope
        I return you your Milton, which, upon collation, I find to be revised, and augmented, in several places
      • 1826: Mary Shelley, The Last Man
        The collation of philosophical opinions, the study of historical facts, the acquirement of languages, were at once my recreation, and the serious aim of my life.
    2. The act of collating pages or sheets of a book, or from printing etc. [from 19th c.]
    3. A collection, a gathering. [from 20th c.]
      • 2010, Will Dean, The Guardian, 29 Apr 2010:
        It's fantastic, as is so much of Forgiveness Rock Record, a collation of so many talents that it's practically bursting at the seams.
  2. Discussion, light meal.
    1. (obsolete) A conference or consultation. [14th-17th c.]
    2. (in the plural) The Collationes Patrum in Scetica Eremo Commorantium by John Cassian, an important ecclesiastical work. (Now usually with capital initial.) [from 13th c.]
      • 1563, John Foxe, Acts and Monuments, vol. 2, p. 55:
        A certain abbot, named Moses, thus testifieth of himself in the Collations of Cassianus, that he so afflicted himself with much fasting and watching, that sometimes, for two or three days together, not only he felt no appetite to eat, but also had no remembrance of any meat at all []
    3. A reading held from the work mentioned above, as a regular service in Benedictine monasteries. [from 14th c.]
      • 1843, TD Fosbroke, British Monachism, p. 52:
        When the hymn was over the Sacrist was to strike the table for collation, and the Deacon to enter with the Gospel, preceded by three converts, carrying the candlestick and censer.
    4. The light meal taken by monks after the reading service mentioned above. [from 14th c.]
    5. Any light meal or snack. [from 16th c.]
      • 1834, Letitia Elizabeth Landon, Francesca Carrara, volume 1, page 138:
        Her first glance was one of triumph—her next was one of mingled admiration and gratitude for Louis; and, accepting his offered hand, they led the way to the banquet prepared in the Palais Orion,—a favourite garden-house, where they often had collations when the party was but small, which was the case to-day.
      • 2008, Tim Hayward, The Guardian, 13 May 08:
        Yes, absolutely; supper, at least in English tradition, was a cold collation, left out by cook before retiring.
  3. (ecclesiastical) The presentation of a clergyman to a benefice by a bishop, who has it in his own gift.
  4. (civil law, inheritance) The blending together of property so as to achieve equal division, mainly in the case of inheritance.
    Synonym: hotchpot
  5. (civil law, inheritance, Scotland) An heir's right to combine the whole heritable and movable estates of the deceased into one mass, sharing it equally with others who are of the same degree of kindred.
  6. (obsolete) The act of conferring or bestowing.
  7. (ecclesiastical) Presentation to a benefice.

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Verb[edit]

collation (third-person singular simple present collations, present participle collationing, simple past and past participle collationed)

  1. (obsolete) To partake of a collation, or light meal.

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin collātiō.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

collation f (plural collations)

  1. (used in collation des grades) the process of granting an academic degree.
  2. (Canada, Belgium, Louisiana) a light snack usually taken between breakfast and lunch (often employed as the analogue of English brunch).

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Middle French[edit]

Noun[edit]

collation f (plural collations)

  1. discussion

Descendants[edit]

  • French: collation

References[edit]


Old French[edit]

Noun[edit]

collation f (oblique plural collations, nominative singular collation, nominative plural collations)

  1. discussion

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]