compluvium

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin compluvium

Noun[edit]

compluvium (plural compluvia)

  1. (architecture) A space left unroofed over the court of a dwelling in Ancient Rome, through which the rain fell into the impluvium or cistern.
    • 1881, William Audsley, Popular Dictionary of Architecture and the Allied Arts: Aquila to Baptisterium:
      In the centre of the floor of the atrium a portion was sunk for the reception of rain water; this was termed the impluvium; and above it an opening of similar dimensions was left in the ceiling or roof, termed the compluvium.

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From compluit (it flows together, it rains upon), from cum + pluit (it rains).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

compluvium n (genitive compluviī or compluvī); second declension

  1. a rectangular open space in the middle of a Roman house, which collected rain water falling on the surrounding roof and conducted it to a basin (impluvium) placed below.

Declension[edit]

Second-declension noun (neuter).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative compluvium compluvia
Genitive compluviī
compluvī1
compluviōrum
Dative compluviō compluviīs
Accusative compluvium compluvia
Ablative compluviō compluviīs
Vocative compluvium compluvia

1Found in older Latin (until the Augustan Age).

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