con

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Contents

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has articles on:
Wikipedia

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English connen, from Old English cunnan (to know, know how), from Proto-Germanic *kunnaną.

Verb[edit]

con (third-person singular simple present cons, present participle conning, simple past and past participle conned)

  1. (rare) To study, especially in order to gain knowledge of.
    • 1599, William Shakespeare, Julius Caesar, Act IV, sc. 3:
      For Cassius is aweary of the world;
      Hated by one he loves; braved by his brother;
      Checked like a bondman; all his faults observed,
      Set in a notebook, learned, and conned by rote,
      To cast into my teeth.
    • 1807, William Wordsworth, Poems, "Resolution and Independence" (composed 1802):
      At length, himself unsettling, he the pond
      Stirred with his staff, and fixedly did look
      Upon the muddy water, which he conned,
      As if he had been reading in a book
    • 1795 Edmund Burke, Letter to a Noble Lord on the Attacks Made upon him and his Pension, in the House of Lords, by the Duke of Bedford and the Earl of Lauderdale, Early in the Present Session of Parliament:
      I did not come into parliament to con my lesson. I had earned my pension before I set my foot in St. Stephen's chapel.
    • 1848, William Makepeace Thackeray, Vanity Fair, Chapter 21:
      During these delectable entertainments, Miss Wirt and the chaperon sate by, and conned over the peerage, and talked about the nobility.
    • 1963, D'Arcy Niland, Dadda jumped over two elephants: short stories:
      The hawk rested on a crag of the gorge and conned the terrain with a fierce and frowning eye.
  2. (rare, archaic) To know, understand, acknowledge.
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Abbreviation of Latin contra (against).

Noun[edit]

con (plural cons)

  1. A disadvantage of something, especially when contrasted with its advantages (pros).
    pros and cons
Synonyms[edit]
Antonyms[edit]
Related terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Clipping of convict.

Noun[edit]

con (plural cons)

  1. (slang) A convicted criminal, a convict.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 4[edit]

From con trick, shortened from confidence trick.

Noun[edit]

con (plural cons)

  1. (slang) A fraud; something carried out with the intention of deceiving, usually for personal, often illegal, gain.
Synonyms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

con (third-person singular simple present cons, present participle conning, simple past and past participle conned)

  1. (transitive, slang) To trick or defraud, usually for personal gain.
Synonyms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Etymology 5[edit]

From earlier cond; see conn.

Verb[edit]

con (third-person singular simple present cons, present participle conning, simple past and past participle conned)

  1. Alternative form of conn (direct a ship)

Noun[edit]

con (uncountable)

  1. Alternative form of conn (navigational direction of a ship)

Etymology 6[edit]

Clipping of convention or conference.

Noun[edit]

con (plural cons)

  1. (informal) An organized gathering such as a convention, conference or congress.

Etymology 7[edit]

Clipping of conversion.

Noun[edit]

con (plural cons)

  1. (informal) The conversion of part of a building.
    We're getting a loft con done next year.

Etymology 8[edit]

Clipping of consumption.

Noun[edit]

con (uncountable)

  1. (informal, obsolete) Consumption; pulmonary tuberculosis.

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Aragonese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin cum (with).

Preposition[edit]

con

  1. with

Asturian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin cum (with).

Preposition[edit]

con

  1. with

Derived terms[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Catalan Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia ca

Etymology[edit]

From Latin conus.

Noun[edit]

con m (plural cons)

  1. cone

Related terms[edit]


Dalmatian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin cum

Preposition[edit]

con

  1. with

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin cunnus.

Noun[edit]

con m

  1. (vulgar) vulva, cunt

Fala[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Portuguese con, from Latin cum, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱóm.

Preposition[edit]

con

  1. with
    • 2000, Domingo Frades Gaspar, Vamus a falal: Notas pâ coñocel y platical en nosa fala, Editora regional da Extremadura, Chapter 2: Númerus:
      Cumu to é custión de proporciós, sin que sirva de argumentu por nun fel falta, poemus vel que en a misma Europa hai Estaus Soberarius con menus territoriu que os tres lugaris nossus, cumu:
      As everything is a matter of proportions, without its presence being an argument, we can see that even in Europe there are Sovereign States with less territory than our three places, such as:

Antonyms[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin cunnus, probably ultimately of Proto-Indo-European [Term?] origin.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

con m (plural cons, feminine conne)

  1. (vulgar) cunt, pussy
  2. (vulgar) arsehole, asshole, fucktard, cunt, retard (stupid person)

Adjective[edit]

con (feminine singular conne, masculine plural cons, feminine plural connes)

  1. (slang, vulgar) stupid

See also[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Galician[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Galician and Old Portuguese con, from Latin cum (with).

Pronunciation[edit]

Preposition[edit]

con

  1. with
Antonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

con

  1. and

Etymology 2[edit]

Cons, Couso, Ribeira, Galicia

Attested in local Medieval Latin documents as cauno, with a derived cauneto,[1] perhaps from Proto-Celtic *acaunon (stone)[2] rather than from Latin cōnus, which should have originated a word with a closed stressed vowel.[3]

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

con m (plural cons)

  1. boulder, specially those found semi-submerged at the seashore
    Synonyms: laxe, petón

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • con” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI - ILGA 2006-2012.
  • caun” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006-2016.
  • con” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006-2013.
  • con” in Santamarina, Antón (dir.), Ernesto González Seoane, María Álvarez de la Granja: Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega (v 4.0). Santiago: ILG.
  • con” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.
  1. ^ "cauneto" in Galleciae Monumenta Historica.
  2. ^ Cf. Xavier Delamarre (2003) Dictionnaire de la langue gauloise: Une approche linguistique du vieux-celtique continental, →ISBN, pages 30-31.
  3. ^ Joseph M. Piel (1953) Miscelânea de etimologia portuguesa a galega: primeira série[1], Coímbra: Universidade, page 99

Irish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

con m sg

  1. genitive singular of

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
con chon gcon
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin cum (with), from Proto-Italic *kom, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱóm (next to, at, with, along).

Pronunciation[edit]

Preposition[edit]

con

  1. with, together
  2. (rowing) coxed

Usage notes[edit]

  • When followed by the definite article, con may be combined with the article to produce the following combined forms (old-fashioned, very rarely used apart from col and coi, which even then are uncommon):
con + article Combined form
con + il col
con + lo collo
con + l' coll'
con + i coi
con + gli cogli
con + la colla
con + le colle

Antonyms[edit]


Ladin[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin cum (with).

Preposition[edit]

con

  1. with
    Antonyms: zenza, zënza

Ligurian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin cum.

Pronunciation[edit]

Preposition[edit]

con

  1. with
con + article Combined form
con + o co-o
con + a co-a
con + i co-i
con + e co-e

Muong[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Vietic *kɔːn, from Proto-Mon-Khmer *kuun or *kuən. Cognates include Old Mon kon, Khmer កូន (koun), Bahnar kon, Vietnamese con.

Noun[edit]

con

  1. child

Classifier[edit]

con

  1. Indicates animals (including the human)

References[edit]

  • Hà Quang Phùng (2012-09-06) Tìm hiểu về ngữ pháp tiếng Mường (Thim hiếu wuê ngử pháp thiểng Mường) [Understanding Muong grammar]‎[2] (FlashPaper, in Vietnamese, Muong), Thanh Sơn–Phú Thọ Province Continuing Education Center

Old French[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin cunnus.

Noun[edit]

con m (oblique plural cons, nominative singular cons, nominative plural con)

  1. (vulgar) cunt (human female genitalia)

See also[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

See conme.

Conjunction[edit]

con

  1. Alternative form of conme

Old Irish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

con m

  1. genitive singular of
  2. genitive dual of
  3. genitive plural of

Mutation[edit]

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
con chon con
pronounced with /ɡ(ʲ)-/
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Old Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin cum, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱón.

Pronunciation[edit]

Preposition[edit]

con

  1. with

Descendants[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin cum (with), from Proto-Italic *kom, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱóm (next to, at, with, along).

Pronunciation[edit]

Preposition[edit]

con

  1. with
  2. on
    Yo cuento con ustedes.
    I count on you.

Antonyms[edit]

See also[edit]


Vietnamese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Vietic *kɔːn, from Proto-Mon-Khmer *kuun ~ *kuən; cognate with Muong còn, Mon ကွေန် (kon), Khmer កូន (koun), Bahnar kon, Khasi khun, Central Nicobarese kōan.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

(classifier đứa) con (, 𡥵) (phonemic reduplicatives cỏn con)

  1. child (daughter or son)
    con cóc con là con con cóc
    A toadlet is an offspring of a toad

Derived terms[edit]

Derived forms[edit]

  • (reduplicated): cỏn con (tiny)
  • (reduplicated): con con (rather small)

See also[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

con (, 𡥵)

  1. I (used when talking to your parents)
  2. (familiar or dialectal, chiefly Central Vietnam and Southern Vietnam) I (used when talking to someone (presumably) much older)
  3. you (used when talking to your child)
  4. (familiar or dialectal, chiefly Central Vietnam and Southern Vietnam) you (used when talking to someone (presumably) much younger)
    con thật!
    It's you for real!

Usage notes[edit]

  • Sense (4) is chiefly used in central and southern Vietnam, perhaps extensively to northern-central Vietnam. In northern Vietnam, cháu is used instead. Some northerners, however, do use con, especially when talking to southern children on southern TV shows.

Synonyms[edit]

Classifier[edit]

con

  1. Indicates animals (including humans).
  2. Indicates some specific things such as knives, ships, boats, trains, irises, etc.
  3. Indicates natural phenomena, such as rivers, streams, waves, the nature or universe, etc.
  4. (colloquial) Indicates wheeled vehicles.
    Anh mày có hẳn hai con xe Honda đấy nhớ!
    I have two Honda motorbikes!

Usage notes[edit]

  • Even though con người is used, it is generally thought of as a noun phrase on its own, and người does not require a classifier because it is itself a classifier (compare Japanese (nin)). Một con người "a person" does not sound dehumanizing, but literary even, while một người sounds casual enough.
  • The phrase con người is popularly employed as philosophical trope or device to bring up discussions about what it means to be human as opposed to be an animal.

See also[edit]


Zazaki[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Related to Persian جان (jân).

Noun[edit]

con ?

  1. soul