conciliar

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin concilium +‎ -ar.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

conciliar (comparative more conciliar, superlative most conciliar)

  1. Pertaining to a council, especially an ecclesiastical council.
    • 2009, Diarmaid MacCulloch, A History of Christianity, Penguin 2010, p. 560:
      The next few years saw increasing tension between those wishing to develop this conciliar mechanism and successive popes seeking to build on the papacy's newly restored integrity.
    • 2011, Norman Davies, Vanished Kingdoms, Penguin 2012, p. 347:
      This was the era which witnessed the beginnings of the conciliar movement, which sought to subordinate the papacy to the decisions of Church Councils.

Derived terms[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

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Adjective[edit]

conciliar (plural conciliares)

  1. Of or pertaining to a council

Noun[edit]

conciliar m (plural conciliares)

  1. councilor, member of a council

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin conciliāre

Verb[edit]

conciliar (first-person singular present concilio, first-person singular preterite concilié, past participle conciliado)

  1. to conciliate, to make calm
    conciliar el sueño - "get to sleep"
Conjugation[edit]
See also[edit]