cond

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See also: cond.

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Clipping.

Adjective[edit]

cond (not comparable)

  1. Clipping of conditional.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English conduen, condien, French conduire (to conduct), from Latin conducere.

Verb[edit]

cond (third-person singular simple present conds, present participle conding, simple past and past participle conded)

  1. Obsolete spelling of con (direct or steer a ship)
    • 1922, Publications of the Navy Records Society:
      Sometimes he who conds the ship will be speaking to him at helm at every little yaw; which the sea-faring men love not, as being a kind of disgrace to their steerage; then in mockage they will say, sure the channel is narrow he conds so thick []

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Lombard[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin cum + de.

Alternative forms[edit]

  • con (Western and Eastern orthographies)
  • cont (Western orthographies)
  • co (apocopic form)
  • coun (Cremonese orthography)

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /kon(d̥)/ (Eastern and Western)
  • IPA(key): /kond̥/, [kunt] (Western, followed by article)
  • IPA(key): /ˈkond(e)/, [ˈkond(e)] (Eastern, followed by article)

Preposition[edit]

cond

  1. width
Ti te vègnet cond mi.You come with me.
  1. by
Ti te vègnet cond la màchina.You come by car.

Usage notes[edit]

  • Traditionally, it's written in two ways according to the context: it's normally spelled con, whilst cond (traditionally spelled cont in Western orthographies and con d' in Eastern orthographies) is used when followed by an article. Certain dialects, though, use the form cond also when followed by a word different than an article. Thus, modern orthographies tend to use always and only cond.